Philips Annual Report PDF cover page image
Financial, social and environmental performance
Royal Philips

IFRS basis of presentation

The financial information included in this document is based on IFRS, as explained in Significant accounting policies, unless otherwise indicated.

Forward-looking statements

This document contains certain forward-looking statements. By their nature, these statements involve risk and uncertainty. For more information, please refer to Forward-looking statements and other information

References to Philips

References to the Company or company, to Philips or the (Philips) Group or group, relate to Koninklijke Philips N.V. and its subsidiaries, as the context requires. Royal Philips refers to Koninklijke Philips N.V.

Philips Lighting/Signify

References to 'Signify' in this Annual Report relate to Philips' former Lighting segment (prior to deconsolidation as from the end of November 2017 and when reported as discontinued operations), Philips Lighting N.V. (before or after such deconsolidation) or Signify N.V. (after its renaming in May 2018), as the context requires.

Dutch Financial Markets Supervision Act

This document comprises regulated information within the meaning of the Dutch Financial Markets Supervision Act (Wet op het financieel toezicht).

Statutory financial statements and management report

The chapters Group financial statements and Company financial statements contain the statutory financial statements of the Company. The introduction to the chapter Group financial statements sets out which parts of this Annual Report form the Management report within the meaning of Section 2:391 of the Dutch Civil Code (and related Decrees).

Front cover: In 2019, Philips unveiled a unique augmented-reality concept developed with Microsoft Corp. to intuitively control the operating room of the future, giving doctors a holographic dashboard of data that integrates imaging, device and medical information to drive treatment optimization. This solution capitalizes on the advanced, integrated capabilities of Philips’ industry-leading Azurion image-guided therapy platform and is being used to gather clinical insights to support a future commercially available product.

Contents

1Message from the CEO

Philips continues to make progress to unlock its full potential as a leader in health technology. Our innovations are driving better health outcomes and increased healthcare productivity, while offering a better experience for consumers, patients and healthcare professionals.
Frans van Houten
CEO Royal Philips

Dear Stakeholder,

In 2019, we continued our transformation as a focused leader in health technology, pursuing our vision of making the world healthier and more sustainable through innovation. I am pleased with the resilience of our businesses as we recorded 4.5% growth while addressing significant headwinds. We made good progress against our strategic imperatives – driving customer centricity and operational excellence, focusing on quality, growing our core businesses, and pivoting to become a solutions company. Our purpose is clear, and so is our firm belief in our potential to grow and create more value, while doing so in a sustainable manner. Reflecting our confidence in the road ahead and the importance we attach to dividend stability, we propose to maintain the dividend at EUR 0.85 per share.

Innovating with purpose

Time and again, customers tell us they like our strategy and the comprehensive view we take of healthcare along the health continuum – delivering innovations for consumer health, precision diagnosis, image-guided therapy, hospital and home care, leveraging informatics and artificial intelligence. They are keen to engage with Philips for innovations that can help them deliver on the Quadruple Aim – better health outcomes, improved patient and staff experience, and lower cost of care. This is reflected in the sustained growth in the number of long-term strategic partnerships we have signed, e.g. with Inspira Health (USA) and Klinikum Stuttgart (Germany), with solutions and recurring revenues now accounting for over one third of total revenues. There is also substantial interest in how we can contribute to care outside the hospital setting – through solutions that support healthy living, prevention and home care.

Aging populations and the growing incidence of chronic disease, coupled with resource constraints, are necessitating a shift from a volume-based approach towards value-based healthcare models, including care outside of the hospital. I firmly believe that innovative health technology – a growing market with scope for margin expansion, in which Philips has strong positions – will help address these challenges, providing better outcomes and productivity gains, as well as extending access to care to those in need.

Our goal of improving the lives of 3 billion people a year by 2030, including 400 million in underserved healthcare communities, infuses our innovation drive with true purpose, as we strive to make the world healthier and more sustainable, in line with UN Sustainable Development Goals 3 (Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages), 12 (Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns) and 13 (Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts).

Innovating with purpose in mind helps us to create more value for our customers and society – by developing truly relevant solutions. Helping people to stay healthy and prevent disease. Giving clinicians the AI-assisted tools to make precision diagnoses and deliver personalized, minimally invasive treatment. Orchestrating and delivering care outside the hospital, in lower-cost care settings. Helping people to recover, or live with chronic disease, at home in the community. All supported by a seamless flow of data enabled by connected care and health informatics solutions.

Increasingly, AI will enhance the quality and efficiency of care, providing clinical decision support, helping clinical staff to spot emerging risks, and freeing up valuable time for healthcare professionals to focus on their patients. We work with clinical partners around the world to develop AI-enabled solutions, like our IntelliSpace AI Workflow Suite, that are secure, firmly grounded in scientific research, and rigorously validated in clinical practice.

In the consumer domain too, connected personal health solutions like our Philips Sonicare Teledentistry service help people to manage their health with actionable insights, coaching, and where needed, support from care professionals.

Determined to deliver the full benefits of data-enabled care, we have significantly stepped up our activities in informatics and data science in recent years. Today, around one in two Philips R&D professionals is active in these fields, and most of our acquisitions since 2015 have been designed to strengthen our informatics capabilities.

As a purpose-led innovation company, we have made sustainability a cornerstone of the way we do business, as recognized once again in the global 2019 Dow Jones Sustainability Indices (DJSI) list. Increasingly, our customers ask us to help them tackle their sustainability challenges; we believe that, more and more, this will become a competitive differentiator. In 2019, we took another step closer to becoming carbon-neutral in our own operations by the end of 2020, with both our US and Dutch facilities now 100%-powered by renewable energy. We also issued our first Green Innovation Bond under the Philips Green & Sustainability Innovation Bond Framework developed together with Rabobank; the proceeds will be used to help finance our expenditures on green innovation, the transition to the circular economy with zero waste to landfill, and becoming carbon-neutral in our operations.

How we performed in 2019

Our financial performance in 2019 was robust, despite a profitability improvement that was below our plan. Comparable sales growth*) was well within our target bandwidth, driven by innovative products and solutions across our businesses and strong revenue increases in our growth geographies. Profitability improved, though well short of the 100 basis points of the past three years, impacted by tariff headwinds, the underperformance of Connected Care, a decline in license income, and investments in growth. We ended the year with a comparable order intake*) that grew a further 3%, on the back of strong 10% growth in 2018, and delivered a free cash flow*) of over EUR 1 billion. Last but not least, our share price rose 41% in the course of 2019 to a 19-year high, outpacing many of our key peers and reflecting investor confidence in our strategy and portfolio of innovative health technology solutions.

Our Diagnosis & Treatment businesses performed well, with improved revenue and earnings, supported by a strong flow of innovations designed to help clinicians deliver a precision diagnosis and targeted therapies. In Diagnostic Imaging we finalized the revamp of our CT and MR portfolios, including the introduction of an industry-first ‘Tube for Life’ guarantee with our Incisive CT imaging platform. In Image-Guided Therapy, 2019 saw the landmark one-millionth procedure performed with our Azurion platform. And we continued to add depth and reach to the Azurion success story, with the launch of innovations like FlexArm, for optimal visualization across the whole patient, IntraSight for seamless integration of our smart catheters in the platform, and regulatory clearance to launch Azurion in China. We are particularly pleased by the continued strong performance of our smart catheter portfolio. We also have high expectations of innovations in the areas of precision diagnosis solutions and enterprise diagnostic informatics, the latter strengthened by the recent acquisition of Carestream Health’s Healthcare Information Systems business.

Our Connected Care businesses had a challenging year, even as we retained market share. The businesses posted modest growth, though profitability decreased. The fundamentals remain solid – our Connected Care businesses have leading market positions and good scope for margin expansion. We have taken decisive actions and expect these to gradually become visible in performance in the course of 2020. In January 2020, I appointed Roy Jakobs as the new leader of the Connected Care businesses to further drive the turnaround. Several new innovations – such as the next-generation IntelliVue MX750 and MX850 patient monitors, our expanded SmartSleep solutions, the latest iteration of our IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition healthcare informatics platform, and our HealthSuite digital ecosystem – will support accelerated growth, while stronger execution will help improve value creation.

Personal Health rebounded well from a slower 2018 with higher revenue and earnings, driven largely by the performance of our Oral Healthcare and Personal Care businesses on the back of portfolio extension and increased market penetration. We are now reviewing options for future ownership of the Domestic Appliances business. Our Personal Health businesses that are focused on oral care, personal care and mother & child care will therefore continue to play an important role in our health continuum approach, through connected products and services that support people’s health and well-being.

Transforming to win

In the face of considerable geopolitical and macroeconomic uncertainty, with strong tariff headwinds, we continue to look first and foremost to improve operational excellence. We remain firmly focused on meeting our customers’ needs, while at the same time taking action to innovate compelling solutions, improve the supply chain and boost productivity.

As we step up our transformation, we continue to be guided by our three-pronged strategic roadmap: Better serve customers and improve quality; Boost growth in core business; Win with solutions along the health continuum. We are making steady progress on our commitment to quality and operational excellence, as demonstrated by improving quality indicators, customer Net Promoter Scores and lower waste. The standardization and digitalization of internal processes, levering the Philips Integrated IT landscape, is leading to higher productivity and agility. Our continued focus on boosting growth in the core has delivered market share expansion in the Diagnosis & Treatment segment in particular. Revenues from solutions, long-term contracts and service business models – including new business models, such as software-as-a-service, pay-per-user and technology managed services – now stand at over one third of sales.

Acquisitions have played an important role complementing our organic growth, and we are pleased with the performance of most of these, for example in the area of Image Guided Therapy, where we are now able to ‘innovate the procedure’ with solutions consisting of combinations of systems, smart devices, software and services, as opposed to being restricted to capital equipment only. With the planned divestiture of the Domestic Appliances business, we are completing the strategic pivot to a health technology-focused portfolio. Domestic Appliances is a strong business that has made a good contribution to Philips, but is not a strategic fit for our future as a health technology leader.

To get the best out of our people and make sure our organization is set up to deliver for our customers and realize our vision, we overhauled our operating model – the Philips Business System (PBS) – in 2019. The renewed PBS touches every aspect of our business and will make Philips a simpler, faster, customer-focused solutions company – a learning organization that aspires to the highest standards of quality in everything we do. Driving a customer-focused culture, where people take ownership and collaborate to deliver with quality, speed and agility, embracing Lean and continuous improvement, is an essential ingredient of the PBS.

Outlook 2020 and beyond

Looking ahead at 2020, we continue to see geopolitical and economic risks. We aim for 4-6% comparable sales growth*) and an Adjusted EBITA*) margin improvement of around 100 basis points, with a performance momentum that is expected to improve in the course of the year. During 2020 we will issue guidance for the next medium-term period, when we expect to continue to gradually step up growth and expand margins and cash generation as we execute our strategy.

In conclusion

I wish to thank our customers, shareholders and other stakeholders for the support they continue to give to Philips. I would also like to thank our employees for their engagement, perseverance and hard work over the past year.

Energized by our purpose, I remain confident in our ability to perform while we transform – delivering innovative, sustainable solutions that meet the needs of our customers and consumers, at the same time laying a rock-solid foundation for an even brighter future as a leader in health technology.

Frans van Houten
Chief Executive Officer

*)Non-IFRS financial measure. For the definition and reconciliation of the most directly comparable IFRS measure, refer to Reconciliation of non-IFRS information.

2Board of Management and Executive Committee

Frans van Houten
Born 1960, Dutch
Chief Executive Officer (CEO)
Chairman of the Board of Management and the Executive Committee since April 2011
For a full résumé, click here
Sophie Bechu
Born 1960, French/American
Executive Vice President
Chief Operations Officer
For a full résumé, click here
Abhijit Bhattacharya
Born 1961, Indian
Executive Vice President
Member of the Board of Management since December 2015
Chief Financial Officer
For a full résumé, click here
Rob Cascella
Born 1954, American
Executive Vice President
Chief Business Leader Precision Diagnosis and jointly responsible for Diagnosis & Treatment
For a full résumé, click here
Marnix van Ginneken
Born 1973, Dutch/American
Executive Vice President
Member of the Board of Management since November 2017
Chief Legal Officer
For a full résumé, click here
Andy Ho
Born 1961, Chinese
Executive Vice President
Chief Market Leader of Philips Greater China
For a full résumé, click here
Roy Jakobs
Born 1974, Dutch/German
Executive Vice President
Chief Business Leader Personal Health
For a full résumé, click here
Henk Siebren de Jong
Born 1964, Dutch
Executive Vice President
Chief of International Markets
For a full résumé, click here
Carla Kriwet
Born 1971, German
Executive Vice President
Chief Business Leader Connected Care
See below for 2020 Executive Committee changes
Bert van Meurs
Born 1961, Dutch
Executive Vice President
Chief Business Leader Image Guided Therapy and jointly responsible for Diagnosis & Treatment
For a full résumé, click here
Vitor Rocha
Born 1969, Brazilian/American
Executive Vice President
Chief Market Leader of Philips North America
For a full résumé, click here
Daniela Seabrook
Born 1973, Swiss
Executive Vice President
Chief Human Resources Officer
For a full résumé, click here
Jeroen Tas
Born 1959, Dutch
Executive Vice President
Chief Innovation and Strategy Officer
For a full résumé, click here


This page reflects the composition of the Executive Committee as per December 31, 2019. As announced on January 28, 2020, Roy Jakobs was appointed as the new Chief Business Leader of the Connected Care businesses (succeeding Carla Kriwet, who left the company), with Frans van Houten leading the Personal Health businesses on an interim basis (with a successor to be announced in due course). For a current overview of the Executive Committee members, see also https://www.philips.com/a-w/about/company/our-management/executive-committee.html

3Strategy and Businesses

3.1Innovating with purpose

As a company striving for leadership in health technology, we believe that innovation can improve people's health and healthcare outcomes, as well as making care more accessible and affordable. At Philips, it is our goal to improve the lives of 2.5 billion people a year by 2030, including 400 million in underserved healthcare communities. Guided by our vision of making the world healthier and more sustainable through innovation, it is our strategy to lead with innovative solutions in key markets along the health continuum – helping our customers deliver on the Quadruple Aim (better health outcomes, a better experience for patients and staff, lower cost of care) and helping people take better care of their health at every stage of life.

We seek to act responsibly and sustainably, leveraging our resources to maximize value creation for all stakeholders. Reflecting our commitment to UN Sustainable Development Goals 3 (Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages), 12 (Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns) and 13 (Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts), we continue to embed sustainability deeper in the way we do business, with specific focus on access to care, circular economy and climate action.

How we see healthcare

We visualize healthcare as a continuum, since it puts people at the center and builds on the notion of care pathways. Believing that healthcare should be seamless, efficient and effective, we ‘join up the dots’ for our customers and consumers, supporting the flow of data needed to care for people in real time, wherever they are. Data and informatics will play an ever-increasing role in helping people to live healthily and cope with disease, and in enabling care providers to meet people’s needs, deliver better outcomes and improve productivity.

We see significant value in integrated healthcare, applying the power of predictive data analytics and artificial intelligence at the point of care, while at the same time improving the delivery of care across the health continuum – optimizing workflows, enhancing capacity utilization and leveraging primary and secondary prevention and population health management programs.

visualdrawing0001

Addressing our customers’ healthcare challenges

For consumers, we develop connected solutions that support healthier lifestyles, prevent or treat disease, and help people to live well with chronic illness, also in the home and community settings. As well as leveraging retail trade models, we will increasingly deliver products and services direct to consumers, supporting longer-term relationships to maximize the benefit consumers can derive from our solutions.

In hospitals, we are teaming up with healthcare providers in long-term strategic partnerships to innovate and transform the way care is delivered. We listen closely to our customers’ needs and together we co-create solutions – packaged combinations of systems, smart devices, software and services, as well as consumables – that help our customers to deliver on the Quadruple Aim of value-based care.

More and more, we are partnering with our customers in new business models, no longer selling products in a transactional manner but engaging in long-term strategic partnerships, where we take co-responsibility for our customers’ key performance indicators. The combination of compelling solutions and consultative partnership contracts, including services, drives above-group-average growth rates, as well as a higher proportion of recurring revenues. We are embedding AI and data science in our propositions to unlock the value of data in the operational and clinical aspects of care processes.

With our global reach, deep clinical and technological insights and innovative strength, we are uniquely positioned in ‘the last yard’ to consumers and care providers, delivering:

  • connected products and services supporting the health and well-being of people
  • integrated modalities and clinical informatics to deliver precision diagnosis
  • real-time guidance and smart devices for minimally invasive interventions
  • connected products and services for chronic care.

Underpinning these, and spanning the health continuum, our connected care solutions enable us to:

  • connect patients and providers for more effective, coordinated, personalized care
  • manage population health, leveraging real-time patient data and clinical analytics.

Our key strategic imperatives and value creation objectives

Our transformation into a focused leader in health technology – shifting from products to solutions and building long-term relationships with our customers – is absolutely critical for Philips’ future. Our strategic roadmap is our guide on this multi-year journey.

visualdrawing0002

Over the last four years, our strategic roadmap has proven itself through the customers we have gained and the significant value we have created.

We will continue to deliver meaningful employment and engagement in the communities where we operate, while doing business in a sustainable manner.

Philips provides new financial targets for the 2021–2025 period

At the company’s Capital Markets Day with investors and financial analysts on November 6, 2020, Philips will provide further details of its strategic plan and performance trajectory for the 2021–2025 period.

“We are excited to continue our journey to create further value by improving growth and profitability, while recognizing that we are in very uncertain times, and with the assumption that the world economy will return to growth next year,” said Frans van Houten. “The new targets are underpinned by our strategic imperatives to further improve customer and operational excellence, boost growth in our core businesses through geographical expansion and more customer partnerships, and win with innovative solutions along the health continuum. Our strategy to transform care along the health continuum – from healthy living and prevention to diagnosis and treatment, telehealth and home care – strongly resonates with customers and has been further validated during the COVID-19 pandemic.”

Philips’ targets for accelerated growth, higher profitability and improved cash flow for the 2021–2025 period are1):

  • An acceleration of the average annual comparable sales growth to 5-6%, with all business segments within this range. For 2021, Philips’ current view is that Group comparable sales will deliver low-single-digit growth, driven by solid growth in Diagnosis & Treatment and Personal Health, partly offset by lower Connected Care sales;
  • An Adjusted EBITA margin improvement of 60-80 basis points on average annually from 2021, reaching the high teens for the Group by 20252);
  • Free cash flow of around EUR 2 billion by 2025.
  • Organic Return on Invested Capital (ROIC) of mid-to-high teens by 2025.
1)The new targets exclude the Domestic Appliances business. As announced in January 2020, the Domestic Appliances business is being separated from Philips, a process that is expected to be completed in the third quarter of 2021.
2)The Diagnosis & Treatment business segment is expected to reach 15-17% Adjusted EBITA margin by 2025, the Connected Care segment is expected to reach 17-19%, and the Personal Health business segment is expected to reach 19-20%.

3.2How we create value

Based on the International Integrated Reporting Council framework, and with the renewed Philips Business System at the heart of our endeavors, we use six forms of capital to create value for our stakeholders in the short, medium and long term.

Capital input

The six forms of capital (resources and relationships) that Philips draws upon for its business activities; all data refer to 2019

Human

  • Employees 80,495, 120 nationalities, 38% female
  • Philips University 5,324 courses, 966,813 hours, 683,336 training completions
  • 32,650 employees in growth geographies
  • Focus on Inclusion & Diversity

Intellectual

  • Invested in R&D EUR 1.88 billion (Green Innovation EUR 235 million)
  • Employees in R&D 12,287 across the globe including growth geographies

Financial

  • Equity EUR 12.6 billion
  • Net debt*) EUR 4.0 billion

Manufacturing

  • Employees in production 35,640
  • Manufacturing sites 35, cost of materials used EUR 5.3 billion
  • Total assets EUR 27.0 billion
  • Capital expenditure EUR 518 million

Natural

  • Energy used in manufacturing 1,400 terajoules
  • Water used 890,000 m3
  • Recycled plastics in our products 1,904 tonnes
  • Pledge to take back all medical equipment by 2025

Social

  • Philips Foundation
  • Stakeholder engagement
  • Volunteering policy

Philips Business System

In 2019 we updated our operating model, the Philips Business System (PBS). With its six interconnected elements, the PBS defines how we work together effectively to achieve our company objectives.

Philips Business System

Our strategy defines our path to sustainable value creation for customers and shareholders.

Clear governance, roles and responsibilities empower people to collaborate and act fast.

Standard processes, systems and practices enable lean and agile ways of working.

We value and develop people and teams, rewarding them for sustainable results.

We live the Philips culture, which sets standards on behaviors, quality and integrity.

Through disciplined performance management and continuous improvement we achieve our goals.

And this is where the wheel gets going. The better we perform, the more we grow, the more we can re-invest in new business opportunities, and the more value we deliver to our customers, shareholders, and other stakeholders.

The six capitals

Human

We employ diverse and talented people and give them the skills and training they need to ensure their effectiveness and their personal development and employability.

Intellectual

We apply our innovation and design expertise to create new products and solutions that meet local customer needs.

Financial

We generate the funds we need through our business operations and where appropriate raise additional financing from capital providers.

Manufacturing

We apply Lean techniques to our manufacturing processes to produce high-quality products. We manage our supply chain in a responsible way.

Natural

We are a responsible company and aim to minimize the environmental impact of our supply chain, our operations, and also our products and solutions.

Social

We contribute to our customers and society through our products and solutions, our tax payments, the products and services we buy, and our investments in local communities.

Value outcomes

Output

The result of the application of the six forms of capital to Philips’ business activities and processes as shaped by the Philips Business System; all data refer to 2019

Human

  • Employee Engagement Index 74% favorable
  • Sales per employee EUR 242,027
  • Safety 224 Total Recordable Cases

Intellectual

  • New patent filings 1,015
  • Royalties EUR 381 million
  • 148 design awards

Financial

  • Comparable sales growth*) 4.5%
  • 67% Green Revenues
  • Adjusted EBITA*) as a % of sales 13.2%
  • Free cash flow*) EUR 1.1 billion

Manufacturing

  • EUR 14.8 billion revenues from goods sold

Natural

  • 13% revenues from circular propositions
  • Net CO2 emissions down to 266 kilotonnes
  • 265,000 tonnes (estimated) materials used to put products on the market
  • Waste up to 26.4 kilotonnes, of which 83% recycled
  • 19 'zero waste to landfill' sites

Social

  • Brand value USD 11.7 billion (Interbrand)
  • Partnerships with UNICEF, Red Cross, Amref and Ashoka

Societal impact

Impact

The societal impact of Philips though its supply chain, its operations, and its products and solutions; all data refer to 2019

Human

  • Employee benefit expenses EUR 6,307 million, Living Wage analysis completed
  • Appointed 74% of our senior positions from internal sources
  • 24% of Leadership positions held by women

Intellectual

  • Around 53% of revenues from new products and solutions introduced in the last three years
  • Over 60% of sales from leadership positions

Financial

  • Market capitalization EUR 38.8 billion at year-end
  • Long-term credit rating A- (Fitch), Baa1 (Moody's), BBB+ (Standard & Poor's)
  • Dividend EUR 775 million

Manufacturing

  • 95% electricity from renewable sources
  • 286,000 employees impacted at suppliers participating in the 'Beyond Auditing' program

Natural

  • Environmental impact of Philips operations down to EUR 154 million
  • First health technology company to have its CO2 reductions assessed and approved by the Science Based Targets initiative

Social

  • 1.64 billion Lives Improved, of which 194 million in underserved healthcare communities
  • Total tax contribution EUR 3.1 billion (taxes paid)
  • Income tax expense EUR 337 million; the effective income tax rate is 22%
*)Non-IFRS financial measure. For the definition and reconciliation of the most directly comparable IFRS measure, refer to Reconciliation of non-IFRS information.

3.3Our businesses

Our reporting structure in 2019

Koninklijke Philips N.V. (Royal Philips) is the parent company of the Philips Group. In 2019, the reportable segments were Diagnosis & Treatment businesses, Connected Care businesses, and Personal Health businesses, each having been responsible for the management of its business worldwide. Additionally, Philips identifies the segment Other.

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Philips Group

Total sales by reportable segment

as a %

2019

Chart visual

3.3.1Diagnosis & Treatment businesses

Our Diagnosis & Treatment businesses are foundational to our health technology strategy, delivering on the promise of precision diagnosis and image-guided therapies. We enable our customers to realize the full potential of the Quadruple Aim – an improved patient experience, better health outcomes, an improved staff experience and lower cost of care.

We are focused on intelligent, integrated solutions (AI-enabled suites of systems, smart devices, software and services) that help healthcare providers to meet their most pressing clinical, operational and financial goals. By integrating multiple sources of information across imaging, pathology and genomics to create a comprehensive single patient view, we support clinicians to realize a precision diagnosis for each patient: disease-specific, personalized, and predictive.

Informatics is central to everything we do. In 2019, Philips expanded its Enterprise Diagnostic Informatics portfolio with the acquisition of Carestream Health’s Healthcare Information Systems business. Adding a state-of-the-art cloud-based informatics platform, our offering now includes advanced Vendor Neutral Archive solutions, diagnostic and enterprise viewers, interactive multimedia reporting, AI-enabled clinical, operational and business analytics tools, as well as tele-radiology and diagnostic patient management services.

We continue to expand the applications for image-guided therapies and improve workflow and integration in the interventional suite. In 2019, less than three years on from its launch, the one-millionth procedure was carried out on Philips' Azurion image-guided therapy platform. In 2019 we also launched Azurion in China, following clearance from the country’s National Medical Products Administration.

Our Diagnosis & Treatment businesses’ value proposition to customers is based on combining our extensive clinical experience with our broad portfolio of technologies – making us uniquely capable to provide meaningful solutions that can ultimately improve the lives of the patients we serve while lowering the cost of care delivery for our customers.

Through our various businesses, Diagnosis & Treatment is focused on growing market share and profitability by leveraging:

  • industry-leading clinical applications and excellent image quality to drive growth in the core subspecialties as well as attractive adjacencies in Ultrasound
  • our unique suite of innovative procedural solutions to support delivery of the right therapy in real-time in Image-Guided Therapy
  • intelligent, AI-enabled applications combined with successful innovations in our systems platforms in Diagnostic Imaging
  • enhanced offerings in oncology, cardiology and radiology, and expanding our solutions offering, which comprises systems, smart devices, software and services

In 2019, the Diagnosis & Treatment segment consisted of the following areas of business:

  • Diagnostic Imaging: Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), Computed Tomography (CT), Advanced Molecular Imaging, Diagnostic X-Ray, as well as integrated clinical solutions, which include radiation oncology treatment planning, disease-specific oncology solutions and X-Ray dose management
  • Image-Guided Therapy: interventional X-ray systems, encompassing cardiovascular, radiology and surgery, and interventional imaging and therapy devices that include Intravascular Ultrasound (IVUS), fractional flow reserve (FFR) and instantaneous wave-free ratio (iFR), and atherectomy catheters and drug-coated balloons for the treatment of coronary artery and peripheral vascular disease
  • Ultrasound: imaging products focused on diagnosis, treatment planning and guidance for cardiology, general imaging, obstetrics/gynecology, and point-of-care applications, as well as proprietary software capabilities to enable advanced diagnostics and interventions
  • Enterprise Diagnostic Informatics: a suite of integrated products and services that deliver a comprehensive platform designed to connect clinical capabilities and optimize workflows around every step in the patient’s journey across a range of diagnostic (radiology, point-of-care, laboratory) and clinical (oncology, cardiology, neurology) service lines.

Diagnosis & Treatment

Total sales by business

as a %

2019

Chart visual

In 2019, Digital & Computational Pathology was moved out of the segment Other into Diagnosis & Treatment to enable better access to downstream capabilities. Digital & Computational Pathology digitizes diagnosis in anatomic pathology and uses Artificial Intelligence to aid detection of disease and progression to reduce inter-observer variability and improve outcomes.

Revenue is predominantly earned through the sale of products, leasing, customer services fees, recurring per-procedure fees for disposable devices, and software license fees. For certain offerings, per-study fees or outcome-based fees are earned over the contract term.

Sales channels are a mix of a direct sales force, especially in all the larger markets, third-party distributors and an online sales portal. This varies by product, market and price segment. Our sales organizations have an intimate knowledge of technologies and clinical applications, as well as the solutions necessary to solve problems for our customers.

Sales at Philips’ Diagnosis & Treatment businesses are generally higher in the second half of the year, largely due to the timing of new product availability and customer spending patterns.

At year-end 2019, Diagnosis & Treatment had around 31,000 employees worldwide.

2019 business highlights

In 2019, Philips continued to renew its Diagnostic Imaging portfolio. Its new Incisive CT imaging platform includes an industry-first ‘Tube for Life’ guarantee. The platform integrates innovations in imaging, workflow, and lifecycle management, as well as DoseWise Portal, a web-based dose monitoring solution that collects, measures, analyzes and reports patient and staff radiation exposure, helping healthcare providers with smart clinical decision-making, increased efficiency and improved experience for patients and staff.

We introduced IntraSight, which seamlessly integrates intravascular imaging and physiology applications for minimally invasive procedures. The scalable platform is based on Philips’ common software and hardware architecture. Following the acquisition of EPD Solutions in 2018, we launched the novel KODEX-EPD cardiac imaging and navigation system commercially and announced a collaboration with Medtronic to further advance the image-guided treatment of atrial fibrillation.

Further expanding our offering in mobile image-guided therapy systems for conventional operating rooms (ORs), we launched Philips Zenition, our new mobile C-arm imaging platform. Zenition is easy to move between ORs and allows hospitals to maximize performance, enhance clinical capabilities, and improve staff experience.

Philips continues to set the standard in integrated solutions for image-guided therapy with the expansion of its Azurion platform with FlexArm and the seamless integration of its smart catheters in the platform. The successful launch of Azurion in China and expansion of its smart catheter offering in Europe and Asia contributed to double-digit comparable sales growth*) for the Image-Guided Therapy business in 2019.

Philips presented the three-year results from two major Stellarex clinical studies involving approximately 600 patients, demonstrating that its Stellarex drug-coated balloon (DCB) is the only low-dose DCB with a significant treatment effect and high safety profile through three years. Both studies showed no difference in mortality compared with the current standard of care. In the US, Philips launched longer 150 mm and 200 mm versions of its Stellarex low-dose drug-coated balloons to broaden treatment options for peripheral artery disease patients.

In Ultrasound, we strengthened our leadership in our core cardiac segment by extending the advanced automation capabilities on our EPIQ CVx cardiology ultrasound platform, making exams faster and easier to conduct while improving clinician productivity. We also continued to expand into attractive adjacencies such as General Imaging and Obstetrics & Gynecology with the launch of EPIQ Elite, a premium ultrasound system that combines the latest advances in transducer innovation and enhanced performance to improve clinical confidence and the patient experience.

Philips’ Ambition 1.5T MR platform with its breakthrough fully sealed magnet continued to receive an enthusiastic reception from healthcare providers worldwide. We also marked the completion of the one-millionth patient scan accelerated with Compressed SENSE, an advanced solution that reduces MR exam times by up to 50%. Our innovations in MR combine to help increase productivity, improve the patient and staff experience, and enhance diagnostic confidence.

*)Non-IFRS financial measure. For the definition and reconciliation of the most directly comparable IFRS measure, refer to Reconciliation of non-IFRS information.

3.3.2Connected Care businesses

Spanning the entire health continuum, the Connected Care businesses are tasked with improving patient outcomes, increasing efficiency and enhancing patient and caregiver satisfaction, thereby driving towards value-based care. Our solutions build on Philips’ strength in verticals (monitoring & analytics, sleep & respiratory care, and therapeutic care) and horizontals (population health management and connected care informatics) to improve clinical and economic outcomes in all care settings, within and outside the hospital.

Philips has a deep understanding of clinical care and the patient experience that, when coupled with our consultative approach, allows us to be an effective partner for transformation, both across the enterprise and at the level of the individual clinician. Philips delivers services that take the burden off hospital staff with optimized patient and data flow, predictive analytics, improved workflow, customized training and improved accessibility across our application landscape.

This requires a secure common digital platform that connects and aligns consumers, patients, payers and healthcare providers. Philips’ platforms aggregate and leverage information from clinical, personal and historical data to support care providers in delivering first-time-right diagnoses and treatment.

Philips delivers personalized insights by applying predictive analytics and artificial intelligence across our solutions. For example, we are able to support healthcare professionals caring for elderly patients living independently at home in making clinical decisions and alerting medical teams to potential issues. Our integrated and data-driven approach promotes seamless patient care, helps identify risks and needs of different groups within a population, and provides clinical decision support.

In 2019, the Connected Care segment consisted of the following areas of business:

  • Monitoring & Analytics: Integrated patient monitoring systems for all price levels, wearable biosensors, advanced intelligence platforms for real-time clinical information at the patient’s bedside; patient analytics, including diagnostic ECG data management; maintenance, clinical and IT services, as well as consumables.
  • Sleep & Respiratory Care: Sleep offerings span from consumer sleep solutions, including those for disease-state sleep such as obstructive sleep apnea, to end-to-end solutions that encompass consumer engagement, diagnostics, people-centric therapy, cloud-based connected propositions and care management services. Respiratory offerings include COPD care management with digital and connected solutions; Hospital Respiratory Care (HRC) provides invasive and non-invasive ventilators for acute and sub-acute hospital environments; Home Respiratory Care supports the home care environment.
  • Therapeutic Care: Emergency Care & Resuscitation (ECR) solutions for both inside and outside the hospital, including cardiac resuscitation and emergency care solutions (including devices, services, and digital/data solutions); consumables across the patient monitoring and therapeutic care businesses; customer service, including clinical, IT, technical and remote customer propositions.
  • Population Health Management: Data, analytics and actionable workflow products are leveraged for solutions to improve clinical and financial results and increase patient engagement, satisfaction and compliance. These solutions include: technology-enabled monitoring and intervention support outside the hospital (telehealth, remote patient monitoring, personal emergency response systems and care coordination) to improve the experience of elderly people and those living with chronic conditions; actionable programs to predict risk (including medication and care compliance, outreach, and fall prediction); cloud-based solutions for health organizations to manage population health.
  • Connected Care Informatics was created in 2019 to drive cohesive informatics innovations across the health continuum. Connecting people, technology and processes, Connected Care Informatics’ capabilities include a fully integrated Electronic Medical Record (EMR) business called Tasy. Connected Care Informatics also offers an advanced eICU/Tele-ICU program, an informatics solutions business under the umbrella of IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, Command Center solutions and integration services (Enterprise Integrated Solutions/IntelliBridge Enterprise).

Connected Care

Total sales by business

as a %

2019

Chart visual

In most of the Connected Care businesses, revenue is earned through the sale of products and solutions, customer services fees and software license fees. Where bundled offerings result in solutions for our customers, or offerings are based on the number of people being monitored, we see more usage-based earnings models. In Sleep & Respiratory Care, revenue is generated both through product sales and through rental models, whereby revenue is generated over time.

Sales channels include a mix of a direct salesforce, partly paired with an online sales portal and distributors (varying by product, market and price segment). Sales are mostly driven by a direct salesforce with an intimate knowledge of the procedures that use our integrated solutions’ smart devices, systems, software and services. Philips works with customers and partners to co-create solutions, drive commercial innovation and adapt to new models such as monitoring-as-a-service.

Sales at Philips’ Connected Care businesses are generally higher in the second half of the year, largely due to customer spending patterns.

At year-end 2019, the Connected Care businesses had around 15,000 employees worldwide.

2019 business highlights

Reinforcing its leadership in patient monitoring solutions, Philips introduced the next-generation IntelliVue MX750 and MX850 bedside patient monitor platforms in Europe. These feature an extensive range of measurements and analytics, as well as new cybersecurity capabilities. Moreover, Philips signed multi-year enterprise patient monitoring agreements with the Kantonsspital Frauenfeld (Switzerland) and the University Clinic of Bonn (Germany) to improve workflow and clinical outcomes in these hospitals.

Philips teamed up with US insurance company Humana to improve care for at-risk, high-cost populations. The pilot program will support independent living for high-acuity patients with congestive heart failure by providing 24/7 access to care. Philips’ remote monitoring capabilities will allow care managers to deliver timely interventions for these patients.

Philips signed a 10-year agreement with Centre Hospitalier Régional Universitaire de Nancy in France to implement Philips’ IntelliSpace Enterprise Imaging Solution. The collaboration will enable the hospital, which provides 1.2 million consultation visits and inpatient stays each year, to streamline complex medical image data management across its departments.

Philips’ solutions to treat obstructive sleep apnea, a condition that affects more than 100 million patients globally, continue to garner healthy demand, supported by the continued strong reception for DreamStation GO’s expanded portable therapy options.

Expanding its range of successful patient-centric CPAP (continuous positive airway pressure) mask designs, Philips launched DreamWisp, the first-of-its-kind over-the-nose nasal mask that allows patients with sleep apnea to sleep in any position they want. With its robust nasal cushion and top-of-the-head tube design, DreamWisp delivers a new level of comfort and freedom of movement, providing patients with the therapy option that best suits their needs.

Demonstrating the success of Philips’ telehealth solutions for critical care, US-based Health First achieved significant results by using Philips’ acute telehealth platform. Powered by Philips’ eCareManager, Health First’s VitalWatch eICU achieved a 23% reduction in overall mortality, a 49% reduction in ICU length of stay, and a 35% reduction in length of stay across its four hospitals.

Philips expanded its General Care solutions portfolio with the launch of the EarlyVue VS30 in the US. This new vital signs monitor uses automated Early Warning Scoring (EWS) to collect critical vital signs and calculate risk-based alerts that allow clinicians to identify subtle signs of patient deterioration and facilitate communication between caregivers for timely intervention and patient care.

3.3.3Personal Health businesses

Our Personal Health businesses play an important role on the health continuum – in the healthy living, prevention and home care stages – delivering integrated, connected and personalized solutions that support healthier lifestyles and those living with chronic disease.

Leveraging our deep consumer expertise and extensive healthcare know-how, we enable people to live a healthy life in a healthy home environment, and to proactively manage their own health.

Supported by meaningful innovation and high-impact marketing, we are focused on three key objectives:

  • Growing our core businesses through geographical expansion and increased penetration
  • Unlocking business value through direct digital consumer engagement, leading to higher brand preference and recurring revenues
  • Extending our core businesses with innovative solutions and new business models to address unmet consumer needs

In 2019, the Personal Health segment consisted of the following areas of business:

  • Oral Healthcare: power toothbrushes, including Sonicare app; brush heads/interdental/whitening
  • Mother & Child Care: infant feeding (breast pumps, baby bottles, sterilizers), digital parental solutions (Pregnancy+ and Baby+ apps)
  • Personal Care: male grooming (shavers, OneBlade, groomers, trimmers), beauty (skin care, hair care, hair removal)
  • Domestic Appliancesa): kitchen appliances (juicers, blenders, Airfryer, food processors), home care (vacuum cleaners, air purifiers), garment care (irons, steam generators), coffee (appliances and accessories)

Personal Health

Total sales by business

as a %

2019

Chart visual

Through our Personal Health businesses, we offer a broad range of solutions in various consumer price segments, always aiming to offer and realize premium value. We continue to rationalize our portfolio of locally relevant innovations and increase its accessibility, particularly in lower-tier cities in growth geographies. We are well positioned to capture further growth in online sales and continue to build our digital and e-commerce capabilities.

We are leveraging connectivity to offer new business models, partnering with other players in the health ecosystem with the goal of extending opportunities for people to live healthily, prevent or manage disease. We are engaging consumers in their health journey in new and impactful ways through social media and digital innovation. For example, the Philips Sonicare app acts as a ‘virtual hub’ for personal oral healthcare, helping users to manage their complete oral care on a daily basis and share brushing data with their dental practitioners, putting personalized guidance and advice at their fingertips.

We also offer solutions that support babies and parents on every step of their journey so that they can more fully enjoy those precious early moments. Philips Pregnancy+ is a pregnancy tracker app that allows moms to follow their baby’s development with 3D fetal imagery. The app offers moms customized information at every stage of their pregnancy and enables them to share their pregnancy journey with family and professionals.

The company’s wide portfolio of connected consumer health platforms – such as our Sonicare dental solutions – leverages Philips HealthSuite, a cloud-enabled connected health ecosystem of devices, apps and digital tools that enable personalized health and continuous care.

The revenue model is mainly based on product sale at the point in time the products are delivered to the end-user or wholesalers or distributors. As with the Direct to Consumer transformation, we see good traction to further diversify the revenue model with new business models (including subscriptions and services).

The Personal Health businesses experience seasonality, with higher sales around key national and international events and holidays.

At year-end 2019, Personal Health employed around 16,000 people worldwide.

a)On January 28, 2020, Philips announced that it will review options for future ownership of the Domestic Appliances business, and start the process of creating a separate legal structure for this business.undefinedundefinedundefined

2019 business highlights

The strong performance of the Oral Healthcare business was driven by its innovative portfolio, including the mid-range Philips Sonicare ProtectiveClean toothbrush, which features pressure sensor technology that alerts users when they are applying too much pressure and automatically reduces brushing intensity, for a brushing experience that delivers healthier gums and cleaner teeth.

Further broadening its product range in oral care, Philips has rolled out its connected Philips Sonicare ExpertClean globally. The new smart power toothbrush delivers superior oral care results with its sonic technology and deep clean brushing mode.

Building on the success of Philips’ leading oral care solutions, the company rolled out the BrushSmart program in collaboration with Delta Dental of California, the largest provider of dental benefits in the US. The subscription-based program includes a discounted Sonicare toothbrush, coaching and teledentistry, and connects brushing behaviors at home with professional dental care to better understand, motivate and drive improvements in oral health.

Philips launched its new smart S7000 Shaver series globally. Designed to address skin irritation and discomfort from shaving, the company’s first connected shaver comes with a personalized solution for sensitive skin and has received highly positive user reviews.

At the 2019 IFA trade show in Berlin, Philips highlighted a range of intelligent, adaptive and personalized consumer health solutions that seamlessly integrate into people’s lives and lifestyles, empowering them to make healthier choices and fulfilling their personal needs. These included the Philips Airfryer XXL featuring Smart Sensing technology, which automatically adjusts cooking time and temperature, and the Baby+ app, which provides parents with a dedicated tool to track their baby’s growth and receive ongoing advice specific to each stage of their baby’s development.

3.3.4Other

In our external reporting on Other we report on the items Innovation & Strategy, IP Royalties, Central costs, and other small items. At year-end 2019, around 18,000 people worldwide were working in these areas.

About Other

Innovation & Strategy

The Innovation & Strategy organization includes, among others, the Chief Technology Office (CTO), Research, HealthSuite Platforms, the Chief Medical Office, Product Engineering, Experience Design, Strategy, and Sustainability. Our Innovation Hubs are in Eindhoven (Netherlands), Cambridge (USA), Bangalore (India) and Shanghai (China).

Innovation & Strategy, in collaboration with the operating businesses and the markets, is responsible for directing the company strategy, in line with our growth and profitability ambitions.

The Innovation & Strategy function facilitates innovation from ‘idea’ to ‘market’ (I2M) as co-creator and strategic partner for the Philips businesses, markets and partners. It does so through cooperation between research, design, marketing, strategy and businesses in interdisciplinary teams along the innovation chain, from exploration and advanced development to first-of-a-kind proposition development. In addition, it opens up new value spaces beyond the direct scope of current businesses through internal and external venturing, manages the company-funded R&D portfolio, and creates synergies for cross-segment initiatives and integrated solutions.

Innovation & Strategy actively participates in Open Innovation through relationships with academic, clinical, industrial partners and start-ups, as well as via public-private partnerships. It does so in order to improve innovation speed, effectiveness and efficiency, to capture and generate new ideas, and to leverage third-party capabilities. This may include sharing the related financial exposure and benefits.

Finally, Innovation & Strategy sets the agenda and drives continuous improvement in the Philips product and solution portfolio, the efficiency and effectiveness of innovation, the creation and adoption of (digital) platforms, and the uptake of high-impact technologies such as Data Science, Artificial Intelligence (AI) and the Internet of Things (IoT).

Chief Technology Office (CTO) and Philips Research

The Chief Technology Office orchestrates innovation strategy and choices, and drives adoption of digital architecture and platforms, as well as excellence in software, Data Science and AI, across Philips’ businesses and markets. Philips Research initiates game-changing innovations that disrupt and cross boundaries in health technology to address opportunities for better clinical and economic outcomes and support the associated transformation of Philips into a digital solutions company. CTO and Research encompass the following organizations:

  • Philips Research, the co-creator and strategic partner of the Philips businesses, markets and complementary Open Innovation ecosystem participants, driving front-end innovation and clinical research at sites across the globe. The role of Research increasingly goes beyond early-stage proof-of-concept, including advanced development on the target product and digital platforms, and market-driven innovation with lead customers.
  • Innovation Management, responsible for end-to-end innovation strategy and portfolio management, integrated roadmaps linking products, systems and software to solutions, New Business Creation Excellence, R&D competency management, Innovation Transformation and Performance Management and public funding programs.
  • The Chief Architect Office, responsible for defining, steering and ensuring compliance and uptake of the Philips HealthSuite architecture for configurable and interoperable digital propositions, as well as modular System Architecture with the right balance between functionality allocated to hardware and software.
  • The Software and System Engineering Centers of Excellence, driving adoption of industry best practices in writing and maintaining application-level software, modular and configurable system design and model-based system engineering.
  • The Data Science and AI Center of Excellence, defining and deploying strategies and best practices for dealing responsibly and in a compliant way with Data Science and AI, developing common tools to facilitate the development process and co-creation with clinical partners.
Product Engineering

The Product Engineering organization is accountable for building world-class Idea to Market (I2M) capabilities and for driving excellence in product engineering across Philips worldwide. The Product Engineering organization includes the following:

  • Philips Innovation Services provides hardware and embedded software development & engineering, technology consulting, and low-volume specialized manufacturing.
  • I2M Excellence is a global program to improve and harmonize Philips capabilities, processes and tools.
  • Technical Expert Group supports innovation and industrialization teams with technical competences and application experience in materials, physics and chemistry.
  • Product Platforms build on existing engineering capabilities and best practices within Philips, covering the full life cycle from design, development and engineering to delivery, maintenance and ultimately end of service.
Philips HealthSuite

Philips HealthSuite constitutes our common digital framework that connects consumers, patients, healthcare providers, payers and partners in a hybrid cloud-based connected health ecosystem of solutions, products, systems, services and devices, positioning HealthSuite as the System of Engagement on top of hospital systems of record.

  • The HealthSuite System of Engagement provides the capabilities and infrastructure for configurable solutions and ecosystems. It ensures consistency across customer touchpoints through a set of industry standards-based ecosystem federation services and APIs. It leverages our hybrid cloud infrastructure that ensures scalability and cost-effectiveness under the most comprehensive and stringent security and privacy standards.
  • Philips HealthSuite is implemented in a layered approach with a Foundation Layer that provides secure hybrid cloud hosting, operations, customer support and IoT capabilities, as well as industry standards-based federated data access. The Engagement Layer leverages this foundation to optimize workflows with embedded intelligence and a seamless user experience.

Philips HealthSuite is managed and orchestrated across Innovation & Strategy and all Philips businesses. The majority of professional and consumer-oriented digital propositions offered by Philips leverage HealthSuite. A growing number of third-party companies have also adopted HealthSuite.

Innovation Hubs

To drive innovation effectiveness and efficiency, and to enable locally relevant solution creation, we have established four main Innovation Hubs for the Philips Group: Eindhoven (Netherlands), Cambridge (USA), Bangalore (India) and Shanghai (China).

  • Philips Innovation Center Eindhoven is Philips’ largest cross-functional Innovation Hub worldwide, hosting the global headquarters of many of our innovation organizations as well as the management of collaboration partnerships. Many of the company’s core research programs are run from here.
  • Philips Innovation Center Cambridge, MA is focused on applications of Data Science and AI in Radiology, Ultrasound, and Acute care. It is the hub for key partnerships in North America, with top engineering institutions like MIT as well as top clinical sites, and for participation in government-funded programs.
  • Philips Innovation Center Bangalore hosts activities from most of our operating businesses, as well as Innovation & Strategy and IT. This is our largest software-focused site, with over 3,500 engineers. The Center also functions as the hub for market-driven innovation in surrounding geographies in Asia Pacific, Africa, and Middle East & Turkey.
  • Philips Innovation Center Shanghai combines digital innovation, research and solutions development for the China market, participating in local digital ecosystems, while several of its locally relevant innovations are also finding their way globally.

Alongside the hubs, where most of the central Innovation & Strategy organization is concentrated together with selected business R&D and market innovation teams, we continue to have significant, more focused innovation capabilities integrated into key technology centers at our other global business sites.

Chief Medical Office

The Chief Medical Office is responsible for clinical innovation and strategy, hospital economics, clinical evidence and market access, as well as medical thought leadership, with a focus on healthcare governance and organization, the Quadruple Aim and value-based care. This includes engaging with stakeholders across the health continuum to extend Philips’ leadership in health technology and acting on new value-based reimbursement models that benefit the patient, health professional and care provider.

Leveraging the knowledge and expertise of the medical professional community across Philips, the Chief Medical Office includes many healthcare professionals who practice in the world’s leading health systems. Supporting the company’s objectives across the health continuum, its activities include strategic guidance built on clinical and scientific knowledge, building customer partnerships and growth opportunities, fostering peer-to-peer relationships in relevant medical communities, liaising with medical regulatory bodies, and supporting clinical and marketing evidence development.

Philips Experience Design

Philips Experience Design is the global design function for the company, ensuring that the user experiences of our innovations are meaningful, people-focused and locally relevant. Experience Design is also responsible for ensuring that the Philips brand experience is differentiating, consistently expressed, and drives customer preference.

Philips Experience Design partners with stakeholders across the organization to develop methodologies and enablers for defining value propositions, to implement data-enabled design tools and processes to create meaning from data, and to leverage Co-create methodologies. The latter facilitate exploration with customers and patients with the aim of creating solutions that are tailored specifically to the challenges facing them, as local circumstances and workflows are key ingredients in the successful implementation of solutions.

To ensure that we connect end-users along the health continuum, we create a consistent experience across all touchpoints. A key enabler for this is a consistent and differentiating design language that applies to software, hardware and services across our operating businesses. In recognition of our continued excellence, Philips received 148 design awards in 2019.

IP Royalties

Philips Intellectual Property & Standards (IP&S) proactively pursues the creation of new Intellectual Property (IP) in close co-operation with Philips’ operating businesses and Innovation & Strategy. IP&S is a leading industrial IP organization providing world-class IP solutions to Philips’ businesses to support their growth, competitiveness and profitability.

Royal Philips’ total IP portfolio currently consists of 64,500 patent rights, 39,000 trademarks, 88,500 design rights and 3,200 domain names. Philips filed 1,015 new patents in 2019, with a strong focus on the growth areas in health technology services and solutions.

Philips earns substantial annual income from license fees and royalties. These are mostly earned on the basis of usage or fixed fees, recognized over the term of the contract or at a point in time.

Philips believes its business as a whole is not materially dependent on any particular third-party patent or license, or any particular group of third-party patents and licenses.

Central costs

We recharge the directly attributable part of the central costs to the business segments. The remaining part is accounted for as central costs, and includes the Executive Committee, Brand Management and Sustainability, as well as functional services such as IT and Real Estate.

Real estate

Philips is present in more than 70 countries globally and has its group headquarters in Amsterdam, Netherlands. Our real estate sites are spread around the globe, with key manufacturing and R&D sites in Europe, the Americas and Asia.

In 2019, we invested in three Global Business Services locations in the US, Poland and India. To attract R&D talent, we invested across the globe in prime innovation locations, such as Cambridge and Pittsburgh (USA), Tokyo, Eindhoven, Bangalore and others.

The vast majority of our locations consist of leased property, and we manage these closely to keep the overall vacancy rates of our property below 5% and to ensure the right level of space efficiency and flexibility to follow our business dynamic. The net book value of our land and buildings at December 31, 2019, represented EUR 1,510 million; construction in progress represented EUR 100 million. The increase compared with 2019 is mainly due to IFRS 16 implementation; for more information please refer to Significant accounting policies. Our current facilities are adequate to meet the requirements of our present and foreseeable future operations.

3.4Our geographies


3.4.1Our Markets

A Market consists of one or more countries operating as a single organization under a Market Leader. Our 17 Market organizations (in three market groups: North America, Greater China and International Markets) are active in more than 100 countries worldwide, working closely in an equal partnership with the various Businesses through Business-Market Combinations (BMCs).

The Markets’ core objective is to understand local market/customer needs, to develop and manage the relationship with existing and new customers, and to deliver orders and revenues and manage the market-oriented profit-and-loss account (P&L). They act as the voice of the customer in the integrated value proposition process, bring relevant products and solutions to market, and ensure local (solution) delivery and service execution, as well as managing the (integral) go-to-market approaches to our key customers and indirect channels – all with the aim of maximizing long-term customer value and gaining market share.

To take quick decisions that are locally relevant and as close to the customer as possible, our Businesses and Markets work closely together in Business-Market Combinations (BMCs) – Image Guided Therapy Systems-North America, for example. The BMC makes agreements where to compete and how to win. Businesses and Markets bear joint accountability for managing the operational end-to-end consumer and customer value chain, quality & regulatory compliance and the collaborative P&L, while leveraging the functional excellence and shared services infrastructure of the company.

3.4.2Macro-economic landscape in 2019

In 2019, world economic development slowed significantly from the level seen in 2018. According to the Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU) the aggregate real GDP growth rate of Philips’ geographies was expected to slow to an estimated 2.3% in 2019, from 3.0% in 2018, driven mainly by the trade tensions between the US and China. North America, Greater China and International Markets were all forecast to show slower GDP growth in 2019, with India, Turkey and Germany the main drivers of the slowdown in International Markets.

3.4.32019 highlights from our Market Groups

North America

In 2019, Philips North America accelerated its drive to deliver growth, customer preference, and innovative solutions across the United States and Canada. As Philips’ largest market, North America continued to expand its scope and scale with a back-office services hub in Nashville, upgraded innovation centers in Pittsburgh and Cleveland, and a new Philips Innovation Center and North America Headquarters in Cambridge (opened in January 2020).

Philips North America continues to expand consultative relationships with multiple leading health systems. At the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) event in 2019, Philips announced a USD 50 million contract with Inspira Health to standardize patient monitoring and drive innovation in diagnostic imaging and image-guided therapies in order to enhance patient care and improve clinical workflow performance. Philips also announced a strategic 5-year partnership agreement with the Regional Medical Center (RMC) in South Carolina to deliver innovative diagnostic imaging solutions for residents of four rural counties. The partnership will help RMC to standardize its imaging platforms and better integrate workflows and information.

To improve access to care, Philips works closely with the United States Department of Defense and Veterans Affairs, to advance AI technology for early detection of infectious disease, as well as advancing adoption of telehealth.

Philips and Walgreens have engaged in a joint effort to help consumers identify the root causes of their sleep issues by integrating the SmartSleep Analyzer tool into the Walgreens Find Care™ platform, and connecting them with Philips sleep solutions available for sale on Walgreens.com.

In personal health, Philips maintains No. 1 market share in male grooming (electric) and reusable baby bottles (Philips Avent) in North America, with Philips Sonicare the most-recommended brand by US dental professionals.

Greater China

In China, Philips is benefitting from good growth, top talent and speed of execution thanks to a strong local strategy.

Driven by Philips’ innovative portfolio of diagnostic imaging, image-guided therapy and patient monitoring solutions, the company continues to win large contracts in China. For example, Philips signed an agreement with the Xi’an International Medical Group to deliver solutions to address clinical and research needs in cardiology, radiation oncology and critical care. With the Chinese health technology market dominated by transactional vendor relationships, this long-term strategic partnership demonstrates the potential to shift from a transactional market dynamic also in China, and our willingness to team up to create more value in healthcare.

In July 2019, Philips completed the design direction for Xiamen Cardiovascular Hospital, and the design concept for the hospital's main lobby, emergency department, screening areas, cath labs, ICU, CCU and general ward. The result – achieved through an iterative co-creation process – is an exceptional patient experience and an efficient operational workflow.

In the consumer domain, we also deepened our cooperation with Alibaba in 2019, to forge a new consumer-centric business model and improve the way we leverage their digital ecosystem.

International Markets

In our other markets around the world, Philips entered into many new customer partnerships, including the following:

In the UK, we entered into a 10-year strategic partnership agreement with Rutherford Diagnostics. This collaboration will utilize Philips’ innovative radiology technology and Rutherford Diagnostics’ healthcare expertise to deliver and operate advanced personalized diagnostic services through a network of community diagnostic centers across England.

In Germany, we signed a comprehensive 10-year innovation partnership agreement with Klinikum Stuttgart. The agreement covers the replacement and procurement of state-of-the-art medical technology, including diagnostic imaging and intelligent informatics solutions, together with joint development of new workflows and connected care solutions.

In Denmark, we signed an agreement to deliver 10 advanced IQon CT systems to the hospitals of the Capital Region of Copenhagen, supporting the delivery of a precision diagnosis for each patient and enabling the transition to a value-based care model.

In Russia, Philips joined strategic initiatives of the Moscow city government aimed at modernizing Moscow’s healthcare system, which serves 12 million citizens. Philips’ focus is on improving the clinical experience and medical technology innovation. To this end, we are providing strategic design and technology planning consultancy, as well as an innovative approach to managing high-tech medical infrastructure. We are also delivering clinical decision support solutions for ICU and operating room environments.

In Vietnam, we announced a seven-year partnership agreement with Hong Duc General Hospital covering a comprehensive turnkey solution for high-quality general healthcare services. Under this agreement, Philips will provide the newly built Hong Duc General Hospital II with the latest medical imaging, patient monitoring and healthcare IT solutions, as well as design, consulting and financing services.

In Indonesia, we announced the country’s first installation of the Philips IntelliSpace Critical Care and Anesthesia (ICCA) system at the Kasih Ibu Hospital in Denpasar, Bali. This represents a significant development in the digitization of patient treatment in Indonesia, with Philips’ interoperable digital technology, predictive trend analytics and smart algorithms helping to drive improved outcomes in acute care.

3.5Supply chain and procurement

3.5.1Supply chain

In recent years, Philips has made the decision to regroup its multiple – business-specific – supply chains into the Integrated Supply Chain under the leadership of the Chief Operations Officer. This encompasses supplier selection and management through procurement, manufacturing across all the industrial sites, logistics and warehousing operations, as well as demand/supply orchestration across the businesses and markets. Striving for a balanced ‘regional vs global’ approach, the Integrated Supply Chain supports our business expansion, ensuring adequate capacity and speed while leveraging our global processes, standards and capabilities. In parallel, Philips has been optimizing its industrial footprint to become more efficient and effective.

When selecting and evaluating partners, we consider not only business metrics such as cost, quality and on-time delivery performance, but also environmental, social and governance factors. We use supplier classification models to identify critical suppliers, including those supplying materials, components and services that could influence the safety and performance of our products and solutions.

Philips Group

Supplier spend analysis per region

i

n %

2019

2019

Western Europe

33%

North America

25%

Other mature geographies

7%

Total mature geographies

65%

Growth geographies

35%

Philips Group

100%

3.5.2Procurement

The foremost factor in 2019 was the increasing trade tensions and US-China import tariffs, which caused direct and indirect financial headwinds. Procurement performance was therefore still highly dependent on product concept re-engineering and sourcing strategies.

During the year, economic growth slowed in advanced and emerging economies, and geopolitics increased uncertainties. This resulted in downward pressure on raw material and component market prices. Looking ahead, we are concerned about escalating trade restrictions, political tensions and the potential impact of Brexit. Mitigation actions are not always possible and in any case costly.

Throughout 2019, Philips focused on capturing market opportunities wherever possible, as well as on continuously optimizing design and costs via various programs, including Design for Excellence (DfX) conventions and Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) programs.

3.5.3Supplier sustainability

Philips’ mission to improve people’s lives applies throughout our value chain. An important area of focus for the Integrated Supply Chain is sustainability, and we are actively working on this together with our partners, be they suppliers or energy or logistics providers. Close cooperation with our suppliers not only helps us deliver health technology innovations that improve people’s lives, it also supports new approaches that help us minimize our environmental impact and maximize the social and economic value we create.

Since 2003 we have dedicated supplier sustainability programs as part of our sustainability strategy. We have a direct business relationship with approximately 4,900 product and component suppliers and 19,000 service providers. In many cases, societal issues deeper in our supply chain require us to intervene beyond tier 1 of the chain.

We want to make a difference through sustainable supply management and responsible sourcing. This is more than simply managing compliance: it is about working together with our supply partners to have a positive and lasting impact. This is why the sustainability performance of our suppliers is fully embedded in our procurement organization and strategy.

Managing our large and complex supply chain in a socially and environmentally responsible way requires a structured and innovative approach, while being transparent and engaging with a wide variety of stakeholders. Insights gained through our 2019 stakeholder day were used as input to manage and fine-tune our supplier sustainability strategy. In 2019, our programs focused specifically on improving suppliers’ sustainability performance, responsible sourcing of minerals, and reducing the environmental footprint of our supply base.

3.6Quality, Regulatory Compliance and Integrity

Our business success depends on the quality of our products, services and solutions, and compliance with many regulations and standards on a global basis. We continue on our transformation journey to have customer-focused global processes, procedures, standards, and a quality mindset to help us maintain the highest possible level of quality in all our products.

For Philips, as a business with a significant global footprint, compliance with evolving regulations and standards, including data privacy and cybersecurity, involves increased levels of investment along with the demands of increased regulatory enforcement activity. Our business relies on the secure electronic transmission, storage and hosting of sensitive information, including personal information, protected health information, financial information, intellectual property, and other sensitive information related to our customers and workforce. For information on how Philips manages cybersecurity risk, please refer to Operational risks

Responsibility for Quality & Regulatory Compliance rests with the Chief Quality & Regulatory Officer, who reports operationally to the Chief Operations Officer and – for regulatory matters – directly to the Chief Executive Officer.

Quality

Philips is committed to delivering the highest quality products, services and solutions compliant with all applicable laws and standards. We are investing substantially in embedding quality in our organizational culture. We will continue to raise the performance bar. Quality is an integral part of the evaluation of all levels of management. With consistency of purpose, top-down accountability, standardization, leveraging continuous improvement we aim to drive greater speed in the adoption of a quality mindset throughout the enterprise.

Regulatory Compliance

Philips actively maintains Quality Systems globally that establish standards for its product design, manufacturing and distribution processes; these standards are in compliance with Food and Drug Administration (FDA)/International Organization for Standardization (ISO) requirements. Our businesses are subject to compliance with regulatory pre-marketing and quality system requirements in every market we serve, and to specific requirements of local and national regulatory authorities including the US FDA, the European Medicines Agency (EMA), the National Medical Products Administration (NMPA) in China and comparable agencies in other countries. We also must comply with the European Union’s Waste from Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE), Restriction of Hazardous Substances (RoHS) and Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH), Energy-using Products (EuP) and Product Safety Regulations.

We have a growing portfolio of regulated products in our Personal Health and Sleep & Respiratory Care businesses. Through our growing Oral Healthcare, Mother & Child Care and beauty product portfolio, the range of applicable regulations has been extended to include requirements relating to cosmetics and, on a very small scale, pharmaceuticals.

Often, new products that we introduce are subject to a regulatory approval process (e.g. pre-market notification (the 510(k) process), or pre-market approval (PMA) for marketing of FDA regulated devices in the USA, and the CE Mark in the European Union). Failing to comply with the regulatory requirements can have significant legal and business consequences. The number and diversity of regulatory bodies in the various markets we operate in globally adds complexity and time to product introductions.

In the European Union (EU), a new Medical Device Regulation (EU MDR) was published in 2017, which will impose significant additional pre-market and post-market requirements. Since the announcement of the EU MDR, Philips has been developing a comprehensive strategic plan to ensure compliance with the MDR requirements that will come into effect in May 2020. The company has engaged in a top-to-bottom review of our full portfolio of products and solutions that fall under the mandate, and has developed a robust and detailed framework for a seamless transition by the time the Medical Device Regulation is operative. We made a one-time EU MDR investment of around EUR 50 million in 2019, in addition to ongoing compliance costs for the new regulations of around EUR 25 million per year. We believe the global regulatory environment will continue to evolve, which could impact the cost, the time needed to approve, and ultimately, our ability to maintain existing approvals or obtain future approvals for our products.

Consent Decree

In October 2017, Philips North America LLC reached agreement on a consent decree with the US Department of Justice, representing the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), related to compliance with current good manufacturing practice requirements arising from past inspections in and before 2015, focusing primarily on Philips’ Emergency Care & Resuscitation (ECR) business operations in Andover (Massachusetts) and Bothell (Washington). The decree also provides for increased scrutiny, for a period of years, of the compliance of the other Monitoring & Analytics businesses at these facilities with the Quality System Regulation.

Under the decree, Philips has suspended the manufacture and distribution, for the US market, of external defibrillators manufactured at these facilities, subject to certain exceptions, until the FDA certifies through inspection the facilities’ compliance with the Quality System Regulation and other requirements of the decree. The decree allows Philips to continue the manufacture and distribution of certain automated external defibrillator (AED) models and Philips can continue to provide consumables and the relevant accessories, to ensure uninterrupted availability of these life-saving devices in the US. Philips continues to be able to export ECR devices under certain conditions. Philips is continuing to manufacture and distribute the devices of businesses other than ECR at these facilities.

Substantial progress has been made in our compliance efforts. However, we cannot predict the outcome of this matter, and the consent decree authorizes the FDA, in the event of any violations in the future, to order us to cease manufacturing and distributing ECR devices, recall products, pay liquidated damages and take other actions. We also cannot currently predict whether additional monetary investment will be incurred to resolve this matter or the matter’s ultimate impact on our business.

Ethics & Integrity

While pursuing our business objectives, we aim to be a responsible partner in society, acting with integrity towards our employees, customers, business partners and shareholders, as well as the wider community in which we operate. The Philips General Business Principles (GBP) – part of the Philips Business System – represent the fundamental principles by which all Philips businesses and employees around the globe must abide. They set the minimum standard for business conduct, both for individual employees and for the company and our subsidiaries. More information on the Philips GBP can be found in Our approach to risk management. The results of the monitoring measures in place are given in General Business Principles.

4Financial performance

In 2019 we increased sales to EUR 19.5 billion, with 4.5% comparable sales growth, and delivered a strong operating cash flow of EUR 2 billion, and a free cash flow of more than EUR 1 billion. Income from continuing operations amounted to EUR 1.2 billion. Adjusted EPS increased by 15% to EUR 2.02 per share. The Adjusted EBITA increased by EUR 197 million, however it was short of our plan, partly due to significant headwinds.
Abhijit Bhattacharya
CFO Royal Philips

4.1Performance review

The year 2019

  • Sales rose to EUR 19.5 billion, a nominal increase of 8%, with 10% growth in the Diagnosis & Treatment businesses, 8% growth in the Connected Care businesses and 6% growth in the Personal Health businesses. On a comparable basis*) sales growth was 4.5%, with 5% growth in the Diagnosis & Treatment businesses, 5% growth in the Personal Health businesses, and 3% growth in the Connected Care businesses.
  • Net income amounted to EUR 1.2 billion, an increase of EUR 76 million compared to 2018, mainly due to improvements in operational performance, lower net financial expenses and lower charges related to discontinued operations, partly offset by higher income tax expense and charges of EUR 97 million related to impairment of goodwill. Net income is not allocated to segments as certain income and expense line items are recorded on a centralized basis.
  • Adjusted EBITA*) increased to EUR 2.6 billion, or 13.2% of sales, an increase of EUR 197 million, or 10 basis points as a % of sales, compared to 2018. The productivity programs delivered annual savings of approximately EUR 480 million, and included approximately EUR 166 million procurement savings, led by the Design for Excellence (DfX) program, and EUR 314 million savings from other productivity programs. While the Diagnosis & Treatment and Personal Health businesses delivered good profit expansion, the Connected Care business showed a decline of 200 basis points, primarily due to tariffs, an adverse currency impact, mix and higher material costs.
  • Net cash provided by operating activities amounted to EUR 2.0 billion, an increase of EUR 251 million, mainly due to higher earnings that were partly offset by higher working capital outflows and higher tax paid, while 2018 included an outflow of EUR 130 million related to pension liability de-risking. Free cash flow*) amounted to EUR 1.1 billion compared to EUR 984 million in 2018.
  • In the second quarter of 2019, Philips completed its EUR 1.5 billion share buyback program that was announced on June 28, 2017. All of the shares acquired under the program were cancelled.
  • On January 29, 2019, Philips announced a new EUR 1.5 billion share buyback program for capital reduction purposes. As of the end of 2019, Philips completed 41.5% of this program.
  • During 2019 Philips sold all of its remaining shares (16.5%) in Signify (formerly Philips Lighting). For further information, refer to Sell-down Signify shares (former Philips Lighting).

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak

The impact of the coronavirus outbreak on public life and the industry in China is also affecting the demand for Philips’ consumer portfolio in the country and Philips’ global supply chain. While this is expected to have a negative impact on the financial performance of Philips in the first quarter of 2020, the company cannot quantify the magnitude and duration of such impact at this time given the fluidity of the situation.

Philips Group

Key data

in millions of EUR unless otherwise stated

2017 - 2019

2017

2018

2019

Sales

17,780

18,121

19,482

Nominal sales growth

2.1%

1.9%

7.5%

Comparable sales growth1)

3.9%

4.7%

4.5%

Income from operations

1,517

1,719

1,644

as a % of sales

8.5%

9.5%

8.4%

Financial expenses, net

(137)

(213)

(117)

Investments in associates, net of income taxes

(4)

(2)

1

Income tax expense

(349)

(193)

(337)

Income from continuing operations

1,028

1,310

1,192

Discontinued operations, net of income taxes

843

(213)

(19)

Net income

1,870

1,097

1,173

Adjusted EBITA1)

2,153

2,366

2,563

as a % of sales

12.1%

13.1%

13.2%

Income from continuing operations attributable to shareholders2) per common share (in EUR) - diluted

1.08

1.39

1.30

Adjusted income from continuing operations attributable to shareholders2) per common share (in EUR) - diluted1)

1.54

1.76

2.02

*)Non-IFRS financial measure. For the definition and reconciliation of the most directly comparable IFRS measure, refer to Reconciliation of non-IFRS information.

4.1.1Results of operations

Philips has realigned the composition of its reporting segments effective as of January 1, 2019, for further details please refer to Significant accounting policies.

Sales

The composition of sales growth in percentage terms in 2019, compared to 2018 and 2017, is presented in the table below.

Philips Group

Sales

in millions of EUR unless otherwise stated

2017 - 2019

2017

2018

2019

Diagnosis & Treatment businesses

7,365

7,726

8,485

Nominal sales growth (%)

2.9

4.9

9.8

Comparable sales growth (%)1)

3.4

6.6

5.5

Connected Care businesses

4,331

4,341

4,674

Nominal sales growth (%)

2.0

0.2

7.7

Comparable sales growth (%)1)

4.5

2.7

3.1

Personal Health businesses

5,685

5,524

5,854

Nominal sales growth (%)

2.4

(2.8)

6.0

Comparable sales growth (%)1)

5.4

2.3

5.0

Other

400

530

469

Philips Group

17,780

18,121

19,482

Nominal sales growth (%)

2.1

1.9

7.5

Comparable sales growth (%)1)

3.9

4.7

4.5

Group sales amounted to EUR 19,482 million in 2019, 8% higher on a nominal basis. Adjusted for a 3.0% positive currency effect and consolidation impact, comparable sales*) were 4.5% above 2018. The positive currency effect is mainly driven by the appreciation of the US dollar against the Euro.

Diagnosis & Treatment businesses

In 2019, sales amounted to EUR 8,485 million, 10% higher than in 2018 on a nominal basis. Excluding a 4.3% positive currency effect and consolidation impact, comparable sales*) increased by 5%, with double-digit growth in Image-Guided Therapy, high-single-digit growth in Ultrasound and low-single-digit growth in Diagnostic Imaging. The positive currency effect is mainly driven by the appreciation of the US dollar against the Euro.

Connected Care businesses

In 2019, sales amounted to EUR 4,674 million, 8% higher on a nominal basis compared to 2018. Excluding a 4.6% positive currency effect and consolidation impact, comparable sales*) increased by 3%, with low-single-digit growth in Sleep & Respiratory Care and Monitoring & Analytics. The positive currency effect is mainly driven by the appreciation of the US dollar against the Euro.

Personal Health businesses

In 2019, sales amounted to EUR 5,854 million, 6% higher on a nominal basis compared to 2018. Excluding a 0.9% positive currency effect and consolidation impact, comparable sales*) were 5% higher year-on-year, driven by double-digit growth in Oral Healthcare.

Other

In 2019, sales amounted to EUR 469 million, compared to EUR 530 million in 2018. The decrease was mainly due to lower royalty income and the divestment of the Photonics business in Q1 2019.

Performance per geographic cluster

Philips Group

Sales by geographic area

in millions of EUR unless otherwise stated

2017 - 2019

2017

2018

2019

Western Europe

3,802

3,990

4,134

North America

6,409

6,338

6,951

Other mature geographies

1,707

1,892

1,905

Total mature geographies

11,918

12,221

12,990

Nominal sales growth (%)

0.8

2.5

6.3

Comparable sales growth (%)1)

1.9

3.3

2.1

Growth geographies

5,862

5,901

6,492

Nominal sales growth (%)

4.8

0.7

10.0

Comparable sales growth (%)1)

8.0

7.6

9.6

Philips Group

17,780

18,121

19,482

Sales in mature geographies in 2019 were EUR 769 million higher than in 2018, or 6% higher on a nominal basis and 2% higher on comparable basis*). Sales in Western Europe were 4% higher year-on-year on a nominal basis and 2% higher on a comparable basis*), with mid-single-digit growth in the Personal Health businesses and low-single-digit growth in the Connected Care businesses, while the Diagnosis & Treatment businesses were in line with 2018. Sales in North America increased by EUR 613 million, or 10% on a nominal basis, and increased 4% on a comparable basis*), with mid-single-digit growth in the Diagnosis & Treatment businesses and low-single-digit growth in the Personal Health businesses and Connected Care businesses. Sales in other mature geographies increased by 1% on a nominal basis and declined by 3% on a comparable basis*), as lower IP royalty income offset high-single-digit growth in the Personal Health businesses, mid-single-digit growth in the Connected Care businesses and low-single-digit growth in the Diagnosis & Treatment businesses.

Sales in growth geographies in 2019 were EUR 591 million higher than in 2018, increased by 10% on both a nominal and a comparable basis*) with double-digit growth in the Diagnosis & Treatment businesses, high-single-digit growth in the Connected Care businesses and mid-single-digit growth in the Personal Health businesses. The increase was driven by double-digit growth in China.

Diagnosis & Treatment businesses

Philips Group

Diagnosis & Treatment businesses sales

in millions of EUR unless otherwise stated

2017 - 2019

2017

2018

2019

Western Europe

1,457

1,557

1,586

North America

2,748

2,879

3,214

Other mature geographies

769

797

851

Total mature geographies

4,974

5,232

5,651

Growth geographies

2,390

2,494

2,834

Sales

7,365

7,726

8,485

Nominal sales growth (%)

3%

5%

10%

Comparable sales growth (%)1)

3%

7%

5%

From a geographic perspective, nominal sales in growth geographies increased by 14% in 2019, while comparable sales*) showed double-digit growth, driven by double-digit growth in China and Latin America. Sales in mature geographies increased by 8% on a nominal basis, while comparable sales*) showed low-single-digit growth, with mid-single-digit growth in North America and low-single-digit growth in other mature geographies, while Western Europe remained flat year-on-year.

Connected Care businesses

Philips Group

Connected care businesses sales

in millions of EUR unless otherwise stated

2017 - 2019

2017

2018

2019

Western Europe

674

751

782

North America

2,540

2,448

2,624

Other mature geographies

571

580

646

Total mature geographies

3,785

3,779

4,052

Growth geographies

546

562

622

Sales

4,331

4,341

4,674

Nominal sales growth (%)

2%

0%

8%

Comparable sales growth (%)1)

5%

3%

3%

From a geographic perspective, sales on a nominal basis increased by 11% in growth geographies in 2019 and on a comparable basis*) showed high-single-digit growth, with double-digit growth in China and mid-single-digit growth in Latin America. Sales in mature geographies decreased by 7% on a nominal basis and showed low-single-digit growth on a comparable basis*), with mid-single-digit growth in other mature geographies and low-single-digit growth in Western Europe and North America.

Personal Health businesses

Philips Group

Personal Health businesses sales

in millions of EUR unless otherwise stated

2017 - 2019

2017

2018

2019

Western Europe

1,553

1,516

1,604

North America

1,028

945

1,003

Other mature geographies

322

334

367

Total mature geographies

2,903

2,795

2,974

Growth geographies

2,781

2,730

2,880

Sales

5,685

5,524

5,854

Nominal sales growth (%)

2%

(3)%

6%

Comparable sales growth (%)1)

5%

2%

5%

Sales in growth geographies increased 6% on a nominal basis in 2019 and on a comparable basis*) showed mid-single-digit growth, with double-digit growth in Central & Eastern Europe and mid-single-digit growth in China. Sales in mature geographies increased 6% on a nominal basis and on a comparable basis*) showed mid-single-digit growth, with high-single-digit growth in other mature geographies, mid-single-digit growth in Western Europe, and low-single-digit growth in North America.

Gross margin

In 2019, Philips’ gross margin increased to EUR 8,875 million compared to EUR 8,554 million in 2018, while the margin decreased to 45.6% of sales from 47.2% of sales in 2018. The year-on-year decrease in the margin was mainly driven by lower IP royalty income and tariffs. Gross margin in 2019 included EUR 191 million of restructuring, acquisition-related and other charges, whereas 2018 included EUR 107 million of restructuring, acquisition-related and other charges. 2019 also includes charges related to the Consent Decree focused on defibrillator manufacturing in the US of EUR 29 million and a provision of EUR 12 million related to legal matters. 2018 also included EUR 28 million of charges related to the Consent Decree.

Selling expenses

Selling expenses amounted to EUR 4,682 million in 2019, or 24.0% of sales, compared to EUR 4,500 million, or 24.8% of sales, in 2018. Selling expenses in 2019 included EUR 158 million of restructuring, acquisition-related and other charges, compared to EUR 121 million in 2018. 2019 includes charges related to the Consent Decree of EUR 10 million and a provision of EUR 10 million related to legal matters. 2018 also included a EUR 18 million charge related to the conclusion of the European Commission investigation into retail price maintenance, and EUR 16 million related to the Consent Decree.

General and administrative expenses

General and administrative expenses amounted to EUR 631 million, or 3.2% of sales, in 2019, compared to EUR 631 million, or 3.5% of sales, in 2018. 2019 included EUR 24 million of restructuring, acquisition-related and other charges, compared to EUR 30 million in 2018.

Research and development expenses

Research and development costs were EUR 1,884 million, or 9,7% of sales, in 2019, compared to EUR 1,759 million, or 9.7% of sales, in 2018. Research and development costs in 2019 included EUR 151 million of restructuring, acquisition-related and other charges, compared to EUR 76 million in 2018. 2019 includes EUR 92 million related to a value adjustment of capitalized development costs. 2018 also included EUR 12 million of charges related to the Consent Decree.

Philips Group

Research and development expenses

in millions of EUR unless otherwise stated

2017 - 2019

2017

2018

2019

Diagnosis & Treatment

765

801

928

Connected Care

433

424

465

Personal Health

304

300

302

Other

262

235

189

Philips Group

1,764

1,759

1,884

As a % of sales

9.9%

9.7%

9.7%

Net income, Income from operations (EBIT) and Adjusted EBITA*)

Net income is not allocated to segments as certain income and expense line items are monitored on a centralized basis, resulting in them being shown on a Philips Group level only.

The overview below shows Income from operations and Adjusted EBITA*) according to the 2019 segment classifications.

Philips Group

Income from operations and Adjusted EBITA 1)

in millions of EUR unless otherwise stated

2017 - 2019

Income from operations

as a % of sales

Adjusted EBITA1)

as a % of sales

2019

Diagnosis & Treatment

660

7.8%

1,078

12.7%

Connected Care

267

5.7%

618

13.2%

Personal Health

844

14.4%

943

16.1%

Other

(127)

(76)

Philips Group

1,644

8.4%

2,563

13.2%

2018

Diagnosis & Treatment

629

8.1%

872

11.3%

Connected Care

399

9.2%

662

15.2%

Personal Health

796

14.4%

860

15.6%

Other

(105)

(28)

Philips Group

1,719

9.5%

2,366

13.1%

2017

Diagnosis & Treatment

512

7.0%

747

10.1%

Connected Care

424

9.8%

684

15.8%

Personal Health

834

14.7%

879

15.5%

Other

(252)

(157)

Philips Group

1,517

8.5%

2,153

12.1%

Net income increased by EUR 76 million compared to 2018, mainly due to improvements in operational performance, lower net financial expenses and lower charges related to discontinued operations, partly offset by higher income tax expense and charges of EUR 97 million related to impairment of goodwill.

In 2019, Income from operations amounted to EUR 1,644 million, or 8.4% of sales, a decrease of EUR 75 million year-on-year . Restructuring, acquisition-related and other charges amounted to EUR 471 million, compared to EUR 299 million in 2018. 2019 includes a gain of EUR 64 million related to a divestment, charges of EUR 99 million related to a value adjustment of capitalized development costs, a charge related to a litigation provision, charges related to the Consent Decree of EUR 44 million and a provision of EUR 22 million related to legal matters. 2018 included a gain of EUR 43 million related to a divestment. 2018 also included: EUR 56 million of charges related to the Consent Decree; EUR 18 million of the total EUR 30 million provision related to the conclusion of the European Commission investigation into retail pricing, of which the other EUR 12 million was recognized in Discontinued operations.

Adjusted EBITA*) amounted to EUR 2,563 million, or 13.2% of sales, and improved by EUR 197 million, or 10 basis points as a percentage of sales, compared to 2018, mainly due to sales growth and productivity, partly offset by lower IP royalty income, tariffs and investments.

The 2019 performance resulted in a decrease in Income from continuing operations attributable to shareholders per common share (in EUR) - diluted of 7% from EUR 1.39 in 2018 to EUR 1.30 in 2019. Adjusted income from continuing operations attributable to shareholders per common share (in EUR) - diluted*) increased by 15% from EUR 1.76 in 2018 to EUR 2.02 in 2019.

Diagnosis & Treatment businesses

Income from operations increased to EUR 660 million compared to EUR 629 million in 2018. The year 2019 included EUR 196 million of charges related to amortization and a goodwill impairment, compared to EUR 98 million of amortization charges in 2018. 2019 includes a charge of EUR 19 million related to an impairment of goodwill; the amortization charges mainly relate to intangible assets in Image-Guided Therapy. Restructuring, acquisition-related and other charges to improve productivity were EUR 222 million, compared to EUR 146 million in 2018. 2019 includes charges of EUR 99 million related to a value adjustment of capitalized development costs.

Adjusted EBITA*) increased by EUR 206 million to 12.7%, mainly due to sales growth and productivity, partly offset by investments and tariffs.

Connected Care businesses

Income from operations in 2019 amounted to EUR 267 million compared to EUR 399 million in 2018. The year 2019 includes EUR 219 million of charges related to amortization and a goodwill impairment, compared to EUR 140 million of amortization charges in 2018. 2019 includes a charge of EUR 78 million related to an impairment of goodwill; the amortization charges mainly relate to acquired intangible assets in Sleep & Respiratory Care and Population Health Management. Restructuring, acquisition-related and other charges amounted to EUR 131 million in 2019, compared to EUR 122 million in 2018. 2019 included EUR 44 million of charges related to the Consent Decree.

Adjusted EBITA*) decreased by EUR 44 million to 13.2%, mainly due to tariffs, an adverse currency impact, mix and higher material costs.

Personal Health businesses

Income from operations in 2019 increased to EUR 844 million compared to EUR 796 million in 2018. The year 2019 included EUR 25 million of amortization charges, compared to EUR 31 million in 2018. These charges mainly relate to intangible assets in Mother & Child Care and Domestic Appliances . Restructuring, acquisition-related and other charges were EUR 73 million, compared to EUR 33 million in 2018. 2019 includes a provision of EUR 22 million related to legal matters.

Adjusted EBITA*) increased by EUR 83 million to 16.1%, mainly due to sales growth, a positive mix impact and productivity, partly offset by tariffs.

Other

In Other we report on the items Innovation, IP Royalties, Central costs and Other.

In 2019, Income from operations totaled EUR (127) million, compared to EUR (105) million in 2018. Restructuring, acquisition-related and other charges amounted to EUR 43 million, compared to EUR 2 million in 2018. 2019 includes a gain of EUR 64 million related to a divestment and a charge related to a litigation provision, while 2018 included a gain of EUR 43 million related to a divestment.

Adjusted EBITA*) decreased by EUR 48 million, mainly due to charges related to movements in environmental provisions and other non-recurring items.

Financial income and expenses

A breakdown of Financial income and expenses is presented in the following table.

Philips Group

Financial income and expenses

in millions of EUR

2017 - 2019

2017

2018

2019

Interest expense (net)

(182)

(157)

(169)

Sale of securities

1

6

2

Impairments

(2)

-

-

Other

46

(62)

50

Financial income and expenses

(137)

(213)

(117)

Net financial expenses decreased by EUR 96 million year-on-year, mainly due to dividend income from investments, while 2018 included financial charges of EUR 46 million related to bond redemptions. For further information, refer to Financial income and expenses.

Income taxes

Income taxes amounted to EUR 337 million. The effective income tax rate in 2019 was 22.1%, compared to 12.8% in 2018, mainly due to lower non-cash benefits from tax audit resolutions and business integration compared to 2018, partly offset by lower provisions for tax risks. For 2020, we expect our effective tax rate to be within the 24%-26% range, depending on the geographical mix of taxable income.

Investment in associates

Results related to investments in associates improved from a loss of EUR 2 million in 2018 to EUR 1 million in 2019.

Discontinued operations

Philips Group

Discontinued operations, net of income taxes

in millions of EUR

2017 - 2019

2017

2018

2019

Signify, formerly Philips Lighting

896

(198)

The combined Lumileds and Automotive businesses

(29)

12

Other

(24)

(27)

(19)

Net income of Discontinued operations

843

(213)

(19)

Discontinued operations in 2019 mainly include net costs related to other divestments, which were previously reported as discontinued operations.

Discontinued operations in 2018 mainly include dividends received of EUR 32 million and a EUR 218 million loss related to a value adjustment of the remaining interest in Signify.

For further information, refer to Discontinued operations and assets classified as held for sale

Non-controlling interests

Net income attributable to non-controlling interests decreased from EUR 7 million in 2018 to EUR 5 million in 2019.

*)Non-IFRS financial measure. For the definition and reconciliation of the most directly comparable IFRS measure, refer to Reconciliation of non-IFRS information.

4.1.2Pensions

In 2019, the total costs of post-employment benefits amounted to EUR 56 million for defined benefit plans and EUR 346 million for defined contribution plans. These costs are reported in Income from operations, except for the net interest cost component, which is reported in Financial expense. The net interest cost for defined benefit plans was EUR 22 million in 2019.

The balance sheet position improved in 2019 from a liability of EUR 834 million to a liability of EUR 824 million, mainly due to actuarial gains in the US pension plan.

In 2018, the total costs of post-employment benefits amounted to EUR 46 million for defined benefit plans and EUR 327 million for defined contribution plans. The net interest cost for defined-benefit plans was EUR 23 million in 2018.

The balance sheet position improved in 2018 from from a liability of EUR 972 million to a liability EUR 834 million, mainly due to an additional contribution of EUR 130 million (USD 150 million) in the US.

For further information, refer to Post-employment benefits .

4.1.4Acquisitions and divestments

Acquisitions

In 2019, Philips completed three acquisitions, with the Healthcare Information Systems business of Carestream Health being the most notable. Acquisitions in 2019 and prior years led to acquisition and post-merger integration charges of EUR 42 million in the Diagnosis & Treatment businesses and EUR 26 million in the Connected Care businesses.

In 2018, Philips completed nine acquisitions, with EPD Solutions Ltd. (EPD) being the most notable. Acquisitions in 2018 and prior years led to acquisition and post-merger integration charges of EUR 72 million in the Diagnosis & Treatment businesses and EUR 26 million in the Connected Care businesses.

Divestments

Philips completed two divestments in 2019 which resulted in an aggregated cash consideration of EUR 122 million and a gain of EUR 62 million. The most notable divestment was the Photonics business in Germany.

For details, please refer to Acquisitions and divestments.

4.1.5Changes in cash and cash equivalents, including cash flows

The movements in cash and cash equivalents for the years ended December 31, 2017, 2018 and 2019 are presented and explained below:

Philips Group

Condensed consolidated cash flows statements

in millions of EUR

2017 - 2019

2017

2018

2019

Beginning cash balance

2,334

1,939

1,688

Net cash flows from operating activities

1,870

1,780

2,031

Net capital expenditures

(685)

(796)

(978)

Free cash flow1)

1,185

984

1,053

Other cash flows from investing activities

(2,514)

(690)

376

Treasury shares transactions

(414)

(948)

(1,318)

Changes in debt

(205)

160

109

Dividend paid to shareholders of the Company

(384)

(401)

(453)

Sale of shares of Signify (former Philips Lighting), net

1,060

Other cash flow items

(186)

(3)

(4)

Net cash flows discontinued operations

1,063

647

(25)

Ending cash balance

1,939

1,688

1,425

Net cash provided by (used for) operating activities

Net cash flows provided by operating activities amount to EUR 2,031 million in 2019, compared to EUR 1,780 million in 2018. Free cash flow*) amount to EUR 1,053 million in 2019, compared to EUR 984 million in 2018.

Net cash flows provided by operating activities amounted to EUR 1,780 million in 2018, compared to EUR 1,870 million in 2017. Free cash flow*) amounted to EUR 984 million in 2018, which included a EUR 176 million outflow related to pension liability de-risking in the US and premium payments related to an early bond redemption, compared to EUR 1,185 million in 2017.

Net cash provided by (used for) investing activities

In 2019, cash flows from investing activities amount to a cash inflow of EUR 376 million, mainly due to proceeds from the sale of the remaining Signify shares amounting to EUR 549 million and net cash proceeds from divestment of businesses amounting to EUR 146 million, received mainly from divested businesses held for sale. Other investing activities mainly include acquisition of businesses (including acquisition of investments in associates) of EUR 255 million and EUR 166 million net cash used for foreign exchange derivative contracts related to activities for funding and liquidity management.

In 2018, other cash flows from investing activities amounted to a cash outflow of EUR 690 million, mainly due to acquisition of businesses (including acquisition of investments in associates) amounting to EUR 628 million. EPD was the biggest acquisition in 2018, resulting in a cash outflow of EUR 273 million, including the subsequent payments. Net cash proceeds from divestment of businesses amounted to EUR 70 million and were received mainly from divested businesses held for sale. Other investing activities mainly included EUR 177 million net cash used for foreign exchange derivative contracts related to activities for funding and liquidity management.

Net cash provided by (used for) financing activities

In 2019, treasury shares transactions mainly include the share buy-back activities, which result in EUR 1,318 million net cash outflow. Philips' shareholders were given EUR 775 million including costs in the form of a dividend, of which the cash portion of the dividend amounts to EUR 453 million. Changes in debt mainly includes the net proceeds from the Green Innovation Bond issued of EUR 744 million, partly offset by outflows related to bond maturity of EUR 500 million and lease payments.

In 2018, treasury shares transactions mainly included the share buy-back activities, which resulted in EUR 948 million net cash outflow. Philips’ shareholders were given EUR 738 million in the form of a dividend, of which the cash portion of the dividend amounted to EUR 401 million. Changes in debt mainly includes EUR 866 million cash outflow related to the bond redemption and EUR 990 million cash inflow from bonds issued.

Net cash provided by (used for) discontinued operations

Philips Group

Net cash provided by (used for) discontinued operations

in millions of EUR

2017 - 2019

2017

2018

2019

Net cash provided by (used for) operating activities

350

(15)

(11)

Net cash provided by (used for) investing activities

856

662

(14)

Net cash provided by (used for) financing activities

(144)

Net cash provided by (used for) discontinued operations

1,063

647

(25)

In 2019, net cash used for discontinued operations consists primarily of a divestment formerly reported as discontinued operations.

In 2018, net cash provided by (used for) discontinued operations amounted to EUR 647 million and mainly included a total of EUR 642 million in relation to the sale of Signify shares and the dividend received from Signify reported in investing activities.

*)Non-IFRS financial measure. For the definition and reconciliation of the most directly comparable IFRS measure, refer to Reconciliation of non-IFRS information.

4.1.6Financing

Condensed consolidated balance sheets for the years 2017, 2018 and 2019 are presented below:

Philips Group

Condensed consolidated balance sheets

in millions of EUR

2017 - 2019

2017

2018

2019

Intangible assets

11,054

12,093

12,120

Property, plant and equipment

1,591

1,712

2,866

Inventories

2,353

2,674

2,773

Receivables

4,148

4,344

4,909

Assets classified as held for sale

1,356

87

13

Other assets

2,874

3,421

2,910

Payables

(4,492)

(3,957)

(3,820)

Provisions

(2,059)

(2,151)

(2,159)

Liabilities directly associated with assets held for sale

(8)

(12)

-

Other liabilities

(2,017)

(2,962)

(2,965)

Net asset employed

14,799

15,249

16,647

Cash and cash equivalents

1,939

1,688

1,425

Debt

(4,715)

(4,821)

(5,447)

Net debt1)

(2,776)

(3,132)

(4,022)

Non-controlling interests

(24)

(29)

(28)

Shareholders' equity

(11,999)

(12,088)

(12,597)

Financing

(14,799)

(15,249)

(16,647)

4.1.7Debt position

Total debt outstanding at the end of 2019 was EUR 5,447 million, compared with EUR 4,821 million at the end of 2018.

Philips Group

Balance sheet changes in debt

in millions of EUR

2017 - 2019

2017

2018

2019

Additional leases under IFRS16

(1,059)

New borrowings/repayments short-term debt

4

(34)

(23)

New borrowings long-term debt

(1,115)

(1,287)

(847)

Repayments long-term debt

1,332

1,161

761

Forward contracts

(1,018)

124

706

Currency effects, consolidation changes and other

347

(70)

(170)

Transfer to liabilities classified as held for sale

1,342

6

Changes in debt

891

(105)

(626)

In 2019, total debt increased by EUR 626 million compared to 2018. Total debt at December 31, 2019 includes additional lease liabilities of EUR 1,059 million which have been recorded following the adoption of IFRS 16 lease accounting in 2019; this did not have a cash impact. New borrowings of long-term debt include the net proceeds from the issuance of the Green Innovation Bond of EUR 744 million. Repayments of long-term debt amounted to EUR 761 million, mainly due to the repayment of a EUR 500 million bond at its scheduled maturity. Changes in payment obligations from forward contracts are mainly related to maturing forward contracts for the completed 2017 share buyback program and the share repurchase program announced in November 2018. These payment obligations are recorded as financial liabilities under long-term and short-term debt. Other changes, mainly resulting from currency effects, led to an increase of EUR 170 million.

In 2018, total debt increased by EUR 105 million compared to 2017. New borrowings of long-term debt of EUR 1,287 million were mainly due to the issuance of fixed-rate bonds, EUR 500 million due 2024 and EUR 500 million due 2028, and a new long-term loan of EUR 200 million. Repayments of long-term debt amounted to EUR 1,161 million, mainly due to the early redemption of all the 3.750% USD bonds due 2022 with an aggregate principal amount of USD 1.0 billion, the redemption of 6.875% USD bonds due 2038 with an aggregate principal amount of USD 72 million, and the repayment of a loan of EUR 178 million. Changes in payment obligations from forward contracts are mainly related to maturing forward contracts for the 2017 share buyback program and new forward contracts entered into for the extended share repurchase program for LTI and stock purchase plans announced in November 2018. Other changes, mainly resulting from new leases recognized and currency effects, led to an increase of EUR 70 million.

At the end of 2019, long-term debt as a proportion of the total debt stood at 91% with an average remaining term (including current portion) of 8.0 years, compared to 71% and 7.9 years respectively at the end of 2018.

For further information, please refer to Debt.

4.1.8Liquidity position

As of December 31, 2019, including the cash position (cash and cash equivalents), as well as its EUR 1 billion committed revolving credit facility, the Philips Group had access to available liquidity of EUR 2,425 million, versus gross debt (including short and long-term) of EUR 5,447 million.

As of December 31, 2018, including the cash position (cash and cash equivalents), as well as its EUR 1 billion committed revolving credit facility, the Philips Group had access to available liquidity of EUR 2,688 million, versus gross debt (including short and long-term) of EUR 4,821 million.

As of December 31, 2017, including the cash position (cash and cash equivalents), as well as its EUR 1 billion committed revolving credit facility, the Philips Group had access to available liquidity of EUR 2,939 million, versus gross debt (including short and long-term) of EUR 4,715 million.

Philips Group

Liquidity position

in millions of EUR

2017 - 2019

2017

2018

2019

Cash and cash equivalents

1,939

1,688

1,425

Committed revolving credit facilities/CP program

1,000

1,000

1,000

Liquidity

2,939

2,688

2,425

Listed equity investments at fair value

49

476

15

Short-term debt

(672)

(1,394)

(508)

Long-term debt

(4,044)

(3,427)

(4,939)

Net available liquidity resources

(1,728)

(1,656)

(3,007)

Philips has a EUR 1 billion committed revolving credit facility which was signed in April 2017 and will expire in April 2024. The facility can be used for general group purposes, such as a backstop of its Commercial Paper Program.

The Commercial Paper Program amounts to USD 2.5 billion, under which Philips can issue commercial paper up to 364 days in tenor, both in the US and in Europe, in any major freely convertible currency. Philips issued and repaid commercial paper in 2019. As of December 31, 2019, Philips did not have any loans outstanding under these facilities.

Additionally, at December 31, 2019 Philips held EUR 15 million of listed (level 1) equity investments at fair value in common shares of companies in various industries. Refer to Other financial assets and Fair value of financial assets and liabilities.

Royal Philips’ existing long-term debt is rated A- (with stable outlook) by Fitch, Baa1 (with stable outlook) by Moody’s, and BBB+ (with stable outlook) by Standard & Poor’s. As part of our capital allocation policy, our net debt*) position is managed with the intention of retaining a strong investment grade credit rating. Ratings are subject to change at any time and there is no assurance that Philips will be able to achieve this goal. The Group’s aim when managing the net debt*) position is dividend stability and a pay-out ratio of 40% to 50% of adjusted income from continuing operations attributable to shareholders*). Royal Philips’ outstanding long-term debt and credit facilities do not contain financial covenants. Adverse changes in the Company’s ratings will not trigger automatic withdrawal of committed credit facilities nor any acceleration in the outstanding long-term debt (provided that the USD-denominated bonds issued by the Company in March 2008 and 2012 contain a ‘Change of Control Triggering Event’ and the EUR-denominated bonds contain a ‘Change of Control Put Event’). A description of Philips’ credit facilities can be found in Debt.

Philips Group

Credit rating summary

2019

long-term

short-term

outlook

Fitch

A-

Stable

Moody's

Baa1

P-2

Stable

Standard & Poor's

BBB+

A-2

Stable

Philips pools cash from subsidiaries to the extent legally and economically feasible. Cash not pooled remains available for local operational needs or general purposes. The company faces cross-border foreign exchange controls and/or other legal restrictions in a few countries which could limit its ability to make these balances available on short notice for general use by the group.

Philips believes its current liquidity and direct access to capital markets is sufficient to meet its present financing needs.

*)Non-IFRS financial measure. For the definition and reconciliation of the most directly comparable IFRS measure, refer to Reconciliation of non-IFRS information.

4.1.9Shareholders’ equity

Shareholders’ equity increased by EUR 509 million in 2019 to EUR 12,597 million at December 31, 2019. The increase was mainly due to net results of EUR 1,173 million, the positive impact of currency translation differences of EUR 239 million, net fair value increases of financial assets of EUR 82 million and the impact of the accounting for share-based compensation plans, including the effect of related hedging transactions through forward contracts and share call options (in aggregate EUR 112 million). This was mainly offset by acquired shares because of settlements of earlier concluded forward transactions of EUR 706 million, share repurchases made in the open market of EUR 621 million and dividend payments to shareholders of Koninklijke Philips N.V. of EUR 453 million (including tax and service charges).

Shareholders’ equity increased by EUR 89 million in 2018 to EUR 12,088 million at December 31, 2018. The increase was mainly due to net results of EUR 1,097 million and the positive impact of currency translation differences of EUR 347 million. This was mainly offset by share repurchases made in the open market of EUR 514 million, dividend payments to shareholders of Koninklijke Philips N.V. of EUR 400 million (including tax and service charges), net fair value declines of financial assets of EUR 147 million, and the impact of the accounting for share-based compensation plans, including the effect of related hedging transactions through forward contracts and share call options (in aggregate EUR 191 million).

Share capital structure

The number of issued common shares of Royal Philips at December 31, 2019 was 896,733,721. At year-end 2019, the Company held 5.8 million shares in treasury. Of these shares, 5.3 million shares were held in treasury to cover obligations under long-term incentive plans, and 0.5 million shares were held for share capital reduction purposes. Philips repurchased and acquired shares in the course of the year, and cancelled 30 million shares in June 2019 and 8.5 million shares in December 2019. In 2016, Philips purchased call options on Philips shares to hedge options granted to employees up to 2013. As of December 31, 2019, Philips held 2.3 million of such options. In 2017 and 2018, Philips entered into several forward contracts in order to cover obligations under its long-term incentive plans, as well as to reduce its share capital. As of December 31, 2019, the outstanding forward contracts related to 6 million shares.

The number of issued common shares of Royal Philips at December 31, 2018 was 926,195,539. At year-end 2018, the Company held 12.0 million shares in treasury. Of these shares, 7.9 million shares were held in treasury to cover obligations under long-term incentive plans, and 4.1 million shares were held for share capital reduction purposes. Philips repurchased and acquired shares in the course of the year, and cancelled 24.2 million shares in November 2018. As of December 31, 2018, Philips held 3.8 million call options to hedge obligations under its long-term incentive plans. As of December 31, 2018, the outstanding forward contracts to cover obligations under its long-term incentive plans, as well as to reduce its share capital were 28.6 million shares.

Share repurchase methods for long-term incentive plans and capital reduction purposes

During 2019, Royal Philips acquired shares for share-based compensation plans and capital reduction purposes via three different methods: (i) share buy-back repurchases in the open market via an intermediary (ii) repurchase of shares via forward contracts for future delivery of shares (iii) the unwinding of call options on own shares. In 2019, Royal Philips also used methods (i) and (ii) to repurchase shares for capital reduction purposes.

The open market transactions via an intermediary allow for buybacks during both open and closed periods.

Philips Group

Impact of share repurchase on share count

in thousands of shares as of December 31

2015 - 2019

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

Shares issued

931,131

929,645

940,909

926,196

896,734

Shares in treasury

14,027

7,208

14,717

12,011

5,760

Shares outstanding

917,104

922,437

926,192

914,184

890,974

Shares repurchased

20,296

25,193

19,842

31,994

40,390

Shares cancelled

21,361

18,830

24,247

38,541

Philips Group

Total number of shares repurchased

in thousands of shares unless otherwise stated

2019

share repurchases related to shares acquired for capital reduction

average price paid per share in EUR

shares acquired for LTI's

average price paid per share in EUR

total number of shares purchased as part of publicly announced plans or programs1)2)3)

approximate value of shares that may yet be purchased under the plans or programs in thousands of EUR

January 2019

45

33.13

-

32.43

45

2,393,008

February 2019

1,663

34.38

111

35.10

1,663

2,335,851

March 2019

1,865

35.58

142

36.01

1,865

2,269,505

April 2019

6,200

31.41

308

35.69

6,200

2,074,771

May 2019

10,914

33.00

10,914

1,714,650

June 2019

6,787

31.30

154

37.48

6,787

1,502,258

July 2019

2,086

40.33

187

39.41

2,086

1,418,122

August 2019

1,624

41.61

285

41.09

1,624

1,350,543

September 2019

602

43.03

122

43.12

602

1,324,657

October 2019

479

39.69

1,449

32.85

1,879

1,260,036

November 2019

1,344

40.57

1,300

32.58

2,644

1,163,154

December 2019

1,285

42.75

1,439

33.50

2,585

1,065,884

Total

34,893

5,498

38,893

of which4)

purchased in the open market

16,293

16,293

acquired through exercise of call options/settlement of forward contracts

18,600

5,498

22,600

4.1.10Cash obligations

Contractual cash obligations

The table below presents a summary of the Group’s fixed contractual cash obligations and commitments at December 31, 2019. These amounts are an estimate of future payments, which could change as a result of various factors such as a change in interest rates, foreign exchange, contractual provisions, as well as changes in our business strategy and needs. Therefore, the actual payments made in future periods may differ from those presented in the table below:

Philips Group

Contractual cash obligations1)2)

in millions of EUR

2019

Payments due by period

total

less than 1 year

1-3 years

3-5 years

after 5 years

Long-term debt3)

5,699

256

293

1,218

3,932

Lease obligations

1,533

292

438

261

543

Short-term debt

92

92

Derivative liabilities

192

68

1

123

Purchase obligations4)

822

370

344

61

48

Trade and other payables

2,089

2,089

Contractual cash obligations

10,427

3,167

1,075

1,662

4,523

IFRS 16, Leases, is effective for the financial year commencing January 1, 2019. Refer to Significant accounting policies.

Philips has contracts with investment funds where it committed itself to make, under certain conditions, capital contributions to these funds of an aggregated remaining amount of EUR 61 million (2018: EUR 86 million). As at December 31, 2019 capital contributions already made to these investment funds are recorded as non-current financial assets.

Certain Philips suppliers factor their trade receivables from Philips with third parties through supplier finance arrangements. At December 31, 2018 approximately EUR 275 million of the Philips accounts payable were transferred under such arrangements whereby Philips confirms invoices. In accordance with the terms and conditions of the arrangements, Philips continues to recognize these liabilities as trade payables and settles the liabilities after a further 30 day period compared to the original invoices.

Other cash commitments

The Company and its subsidiaries sponsor post-employment benefit plans in many countries in accordance with legal requirements, customs and the local situation in the countries involved. For a discussion of the plans and expected cash outflows, please refer to Post-employment benefits.

The company had EUR 156 million restructuring-related provisions by the end of 2019, of which EUR 125 million is expected to result in cash outflows in 2020. Refer to Provisions for details of restructuring provisions.

Please refer to Dividend for information on the proposed dividend distribution.

As of December 31, 2019, Philips has completed 41.5% of its EUR 1.5 billion share buyback program for capital reduction purposes that was announced on January 29, 2019. As the program was initiated for capital reduction purposes, Philips intends to cancel all of the shares acquired under the program.

Guarantees

Philips’ policy is to provide guarantees and other letters of support only in writing. Philips does not provide other forms of support. The total fair value of guarantees recognized on the balance sheet amounts to EUR nil million for both 2018 and 2019. Remaining off-balance-sheet business and credit-related guarantees provided on behalf of third parties and associates decreased by EUR 19 million during 2019 to EUR 21 million (December 31, 2018: EUR 40 million).

4.1.11Dividend

Dividend policy

Philips’ dividend policy is aimed at dividend stability and a pay-out ratio of 40% to 50% of adjusted income from continuing operations attributable to shareholders*).

For 2019, the key exclusions to arrive at the adjusted income from continuing operations attributable to shareholders*) are described in Net income, Income from operations (EBIT) and Adjusted EBITA*) in chapter Financial performance.

Proposed distribution

A proposal will be submitted to the Annual General Meeting of Shareholders, to be held on April 30, 2020, to declare a distribution of EUR 0.85 per common share, in cash or shares at the option of the shareholder (up to EUR 761 million if all shareholders would elect cash), against the net income for 2019.

If the above dividend proposal is adopted, the shares will be traded ex-dividend as of May 5, 2020 at the New York Stock Exchange and Euronext Amsterdam. In compliance with the listing requirements of the New York Stock Exchange and Euronext Amsterdam, the dividend record date will be May 6, 2020.

Shareholders will be given the opportunity to make their choice between cash and shares between May 7 and 29, 2020. If no choice is made during this election period the dividend will be paid in cash. On May 29, 2020 after close of trading, the number of share dividend rights entitled to one new common share will be determined based on the volume-weighted average price of all traded common shares of Koninklijke Philips N.V. at Euronext Amsterdam on May 27, 28 and 29, 2020. The company will calculate the number of share dividend rights entitled to one new common share (the ratio), such that the gross dividend in shares will be approximately equal to the gross dividend in cash. The ratio and the number of shares to be issued will be announced on June 3, 2020. Payment of the dividend and delivery of new common shares, with settlement of fractions in cash, if required, will take place from June 4, 2020. The distribution of dividend in cash to holders of New York Registry shares will be made in USD at the USD/EUR rate as per WM/ Reuters FX Benchmark 2 PM CET fixing of June 2, 2020.

ex-dividend date

record date

payment date

Euronext Amsterdam

May 5, 2020

May 6, 2020

June 4, 2020

New York Stock Exchange

May 5, 2020

May 6, 2020

June 4, 2020

Further details will be given in the agenda for the 2020 Annual General Meeting of Shareholders. All dates mentioned remain provisional until then.

Dividend in cash is in principle subject to 15% Dutch dividend withholding tax, which will be deducted from the dividend in cash paid to the shareholders. Dividend in shares paid out of net income and retained earnings is subject to 15% dividend withholding tax, but only in respect of the par value of the shares (EUR 0.20 per share). Shareholders are advised to consult their tax advisor on the applicable situation with respect to taxes on the dividend received.

In 2019, Philips settled a dividend of EUR 0.85 per common share, representing a total value of EUR 775 million including costs. Shareholders could elect for a cash dividend or a share dividend. Approximately 42% of the shareholders elected for a share dividend, resulting in the issuance of 9,079,538 new common shares, leading to a 1.0% dilution. The dilution caused by the newly issued dividend shares was more than offset by the cancellation of 30,000,000 shares in June, and 8,541,356 shares in December 2019. The settlement of the cash dividend involved an amount of EUR 453 million (including costs).

Dividends and distributions per common share

The following table sets forth in euros the gross dividends on the common shares in the fiscal years indicated (from prior-year profit distribution) and such amounts as converted into US dollars and paid to holders of shares of the New York Registry:

Philips Group

Gross dividends on the common shares

2015 - 2019

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

in EUR

0.80

0.80

0.80

0.80

0.85

in USD

0.89

0.90

0.90

0.94

0.96

*)Non-IFRS financial measure. For the definition and reconciliation of the most directly comparable IFRS measure, refer to Reconciliation of non-IFRS information.

4.1.12Sell-down Signify shares (former Philips Lighting)

In 2014, Philips announced its plan to sharpen its strategic focus by establishing two standalone companies focused on the HealthTech and Lighting opportunities respectively. After establishing a stand-alone structure for lighting activities within the Philips Group, Philips Lighting (renamed Signify in 2018) was listed and started trading on Euronext in Amsterdam under the symbol ‘LIGHT’ on May 27, 2016.


Following the listing of Signify, Philips retained a 71.23% stake. Through a series of Accelerated bookbuild offerings (in total four) and open market sales in the course of 2017 and 2018, Philips’ shareholding was reduced to 16.5% of Signify’s issued share capital as of December 31, 2018. From an accounting perspective, it is noted that Philips’ lighting activities (substantially representing Signify shares) were presented as a discontinued operation from April 2017, and that Signify was deconsolidated in November 2017 and presented as an Asset classified as held for sale until December 31, 2018. As from that date, the remaining Signify shares were reclassified to Other current financial assets, with fair value changes recognized through Other comprehensive income.

During 2019, Philips sold Signify shares in the open market, further reducing its shareholding to 10.7% of Signify’s issued share capital. Subsequently, in September 2019, Philips successfully completed a fifth Accelerated bookbuild offering, reducing its shareholding in Signify to nil.

4.1.13Analysis of 2018 compared to 2017

The analysis of the 2018 financial results compared to 2017, and the discussion of the critical accounting policies, have not been included in this Annual Report. These sections are included in Philips’ Form 20-F for the financial year 2019, which will be filed electronically with the US Securities and Exchange Commission.

5Societal impact

We are a purpose-driven company, aiming to improve the lives of 3 billion people annually by 2030. Our people draw inspiration from the societal impact we achieve through our products and solutions, on both the social and environmental dimensions. In the Annual Report 2017, 2018 and 2019 we quantified the environmental impact that we have as a company in Environmental performance.

In 2018 we started to apply the True Value methodology to quantify our social impact. This includes the social impact in our supply chain, training of our staff, and taxes we pay. We included these impacts in How we create value. We have also started to quantify the most complex part, the social impact we have through our products and solutions. We will continue to calculate the impact of our products and solutions in collaboration with knowledge partners and investors.

5.1Social performance

Our people strategy supports a constantly evolving workforce, capable of delivering strong business performance and executing our strategy. As such we focus on our Workforce of the Future and our deep commitment to Inclusion & Diversity, supported by our culture.

5.1.1Improving people’s lives

At Philips, we strive to make the world healthier and more sustainable through innovation. It is our goal to improve the lives of 3 billion people a year by 2030.

To guide our efforts and measure our progress, we take a two-dimensional approach – social and ecological – to improving people’s lives. Products or solutions from our portfolio that directly support the curative or preventive side of people’s health determine the contribution to the social dimension. This is also our contribution to UN Sustainable Development Goal 3 (Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages). As healthy ecosystems are also needed for people to live a healthy life, the contribution to the ecological dimension is determined by means of our steadily growing Green Products and Solutions portfolio, such as the energy-efficient products in our Personal Health businesses. This is our contribution to Sustainable Development Goal 12 (Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns) and SDG 13 (Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts).

Philips improved 1.64 billion lives in 2019, an increase of around 100 million compared to 2018, driven by all segments, mainly in China, the ASEAN countries, North America and the Middle East & Turkey. Through Philips products and solutions that support people’s health and well-being, we improved the lives of 1.54 billion people in 2019 (2018: 1.43 billion), mainly driven by Diagnosis & Treatment businesses and Connected Care businesses. Our Green Products and Solutions that support a healthy ecosystem contributed 1.07 billion lives (2018: 1.00 billion). After the elimination of double counts – people touched multiple times – we arrived at 1.64 billion lives.

In 2019, Philips extended its commitment to improve the lives of people in underserved healthcare communities to 400 million by 2030. Philips thereby recognized the often critical needs of women and children in many communities, but also the added burden arising from the increase in non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in communities already struggling without adequate access to healthcare. To monitor progress on this extended commitment, we track lives improved in underserved healthcare communities. In 2019 our health and well-being solutions improved the lives of 194 million people in underserved markets (an increase of 20 million compared to 2018).

Lives Improved per market

The following table shows the number of Lives Improved per market.

Philips Group

Lives improved per market

Market

Lives Improved (million)1)

Population (million)2)

Saturation rate (as % of population)

GDP (USD million)3)

Africa

33

1,290

3%

2,407

ASEAN & Pacific

158

981

16%

6,700

Benelux

27

29

94%

1,489

Central & Eastern Europe

80

166

48%

1,909

Germany, Austria & Switzerland

81

101

80%

5,033

France

45

66

67%

2,739

Greater China

426

1,432

30%

15,141

Iberia

30

57

52%

1,639

Indian Subcontinent

79

1,570

5%

3,372

Italy, Israel & Greece

35

82

43%

2,631

Japan

42

126

33%

5,155

Latin America

99

645

15%

5,430

Middle East & Turkey

69

372

18%

3,246

Nordics

18

28

67%

1,594

North America

344

367

94%

23,170

Russia & Central Asia

43

251

17%

2,085

UK & Ireland

35

72

48%

3,143

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5.1.2Workforce of the Future

The challenges presented by the fast-evolving industry landscape demand a networked organization in which cross-functional teams actively draw on resources across the organization and across the world. Our Workforce of the Future program reflects our commitment to meet the challenge of addressing our customers’ unmet needs and deliver the full benefits of data-enabled connected care – by attracting, developing and retaining a workforce that will deliver the strategic capabilities we need to win.

By applying Strategic Workforce Planning, in close alignment with the strategic planning of our businesses, we identify and develop the employee capabilities needed to realize our ambitions as a health technology company. In 2019 we implemented company-wide initiatives to retain and staff our most strategic positions with top performers. At the end of 2019 we retained 93% of these employees and staffed 52% of our strategic positions with employees who are considered to be top performers. Key drivers of this are our internal development focus, leadership programs and our focused talent search services.

We have also been addressing the challenge of the expanding workforce and our ability to tap into the gig economy and other less traditional work constructs. We continue to recognize the significant contribution contingent workers make to our company. Therefore, building on earlier initiatives, we have ensured that both our workforce demand management system and our talent acquisition processes include contingent and regular employee solutions in staffing proposals and decisions. Our Total Workforce strategy considers all sources of skills and capabilities we require in the Workforce of the Future, as well as location-related talent availability and labor market trends. We continued to devote additional attention to our campus, graduate and early-career hiring in 2019, which resulted in an increase in the number of campus hires compared to 2018. Our focus on the Workforce of the Future will continue in 2020, with further emphasis on strategic capabilities.

More information on training and learning programs can be found in People development.

5.1.3Inclusion & Diversity

To be able to understand and meet customer and patient needs in a complex and continually changing environment, our workforce should reflect the society in which we operate, our customers, and the markets we serve. We believe that an inclusive culture allows our 120-plus nationalities to bring a rich diversity of capabilities, opinions and perspectives to our decision-making processes, thus driving innovation, enabling faster, targeted responses to market changes, and supporting sustainable improvements in business performance.

Two years ago, we renewed our approach to Inclusion & Diversity. We set a goal of 25% gender diversity in senior leadership positions (a subset of Management and Executive positions) by the end of 2020 (compared with 19% at the end of 2017). In 2019, we again partnered with leading Inclusion & Diversity training providers to further roll out unconscious bias and inclusion trainings. With regard to appointment and promotion opportunities, we transparently share open positions and endeavor to attract candidates from a diverse range of backgrounds. Diverse interview panels are put in place for recruitment to leadership positions. In 2019, we increased the number of Senior Women’s Leadership Programs for the third consecutive year.

Philips Group

Gender diversity

in %

2017 - 2019

Chart visual

Overall gender diversity remained stable at 38% in 2019 whilst gender diversity among Executives increased from 19% to 22% female executives. Measured against our 2020 goal of 25% gender diversity in leadership positions, we increased from 21% in 2018 to 24% in 2019.

5.1.4Our culture

As we continue our transformation into a focused leader in health technology – shifting from products to solutions and building long-term relationships with our customers – we are fostering a culture within Philips that will help us achieve operational excellence and extend our solutions capability to address our customers’ unmet needs.

All Philips employees are expected to commit to living our behaviors – Customers first, Quality and integrity always, Team up to win, Take ownership to deliver fast, and Eager to improve and inspire – every step of the way.

Putting our customers first must be at the heart of everything we do. Only by engaging deeply with our customers can we understand their unmet needs and deliver superior value. We also need to be conscious at all times of the high-stakes environment in which we operate. This environment demands that we apply the highest quality and integrity standards – always. To deliver superior value to our customers and ensure quality and integrity, we need to improve how we team up and leverage the skills, capabilities and expertise right across Philips. At the same time, we all need to take personal ownership, enabling us to move with speed and agility, and deliver what we promise, on time. And by applying operational excellence and Lean ways of working, we will keep improving and inspiring each other through the work we do.

We staff our positions based on assessed behavior, potential and capabilities. In 2019, we filled 74% of our Director-level and more senior positions from within the company. For these internal hires, we ensure our candidates are high performers with strong potential. In 2019, 79% of all internal promotions to Director level and more senior positions were realized by appointing top performers. We supplement this internal growth with targeted external hiring, bringing in employees with the behaviors and capabilities we require for our Workforce of the Future.

5.1.5Employee engagement

High employee engagement is crucial to the success of our strategy. Our employee survey consistently reports high levels of employee engagement that exceed the high-performance norm of 70%. Our average engagement score for 2019 was 74%, in line with our engagement levels in 2018. We remain substantially above the high-performance norm, driven by our employees’ pride to work for Philips and the positive energy they get from their job.

Philips Group

Employee Engagement index

in %

2017 - 2019

Chart visual

Our quarterly employee surveys help to keep our finger on the pulse of employee sentiment toward the company. We listen to employees’ ideas for improvement, show employees that their feedback is valued, and work to ensure that every person in our company has a role to play in creating lasting value for our customers, shareholders, and other stakeholders.

At Philips, we believe we perform at our best when we look after ourselves and each other. In 2019, we continued to develop our Health & Wellbeing programs, which are designed to engage our employees and help them to adopt a healthier lifestyle and achieve a better work/life integration. Through the ongoing engagement of a network of Health & Wellbeing ambassadors, we also leveraged the energy and experience of our employees to drive local wellbeing initiatives in our markets. These included on-site exercise and fitness clubs, Mindfulness classes and Energy Management workshops.

5.1.6Employment

The total number of Philips Group employees was 80,495 at the end of 2019, compared to 77,400 at the end of 2018, an increase of 3,095 FTE.

The increase of 1,765 FTE for Diagnosis & Treatment results mainly from acquisitions in healthcare informatics and precision diagnosis and the move of Emerging Businesses out of segment Other into segment Diagnosis & Treatment; for more information please refer to Diagnosis & Treatment businesses.

The 2,481 increase in FTE in ‘Other changes’ reflects, among other things, the increase in Commercial and Manufacturing employees and the shift of supporting roles to Global Business Services organizations.

Philips Group

Employees per segment

in FTEs at year-end

2017 - 2019

2017

2018

2019

Diagnosis & Treatment

28,904

29,546

31,311

Connected Care

15,010

15,085

14,939

Personal Health

17,253

16,132

16,448

Other

12,784

16,637

17,797

Philips Group

73,951

77,400

80,495

Philips Group

Employment

in FTEs

2017 - 2019

2017

2018

2019

Balance as of January 1

114,731

73,951

77,400

Consolidation changes:

Acquisitions

1,812

331

900

Divestments

(332)

(107)

(286)

Changes in Discontinued operations

(43,763)

Other changes

1,502

3,225

2,481

Balance as of December 31

73,951

77,400

80,495

Geographic footprint

Approximately 59% (2018: 61%) of the Philips workforce is located in mature geographies and 41% (2018: 39%) in growth geographies. In 2019, the number of employees in mature geographies increased by 508. The number of employees in growth geographies increased by 2,588.

Philips Group

Employees per geographic cluster

in FTEs at year-end

2017 - 2019

2017

2018

2019

Western Europe

21,055

21,399

21,645

North America

20,937

21,703

21,483

Other mature geographies

3,962

4,236

4,718

Mature geographies

45,954

47,338

47,846

Growth geographies

27,997

30,062

32,650

Philips Group

73,951

77,400

80,495

Employee turnover

In 2019, employee turnover amounted to 15.0%, of which 8.6% was voluntary, compared to 14.2% (8.6% voluntary) in 2018. External benchmarks show that our voluntary employee turnover remains well below similar-sized companies, and that we are reasonably successful in retaining our employees.

With our focus on increasing gender diversity in leadership positions, we reduced voluntary female executive turnover from 8.8% in 2018 to 4.2% in 2019.

Philips Group

Employee turnover in %

2019

Staff

Professionals

Management

Executives

Total

Female

22.3

12.9

11.5

16.7

17.7

Male

17.8

11.0

10.6

17.8

13.4

Philips Group

20.0

11.6

10.9

17.5

15.0

Philips Group

Voluntary turnover

in %

2019

Staff

Professionals

Management

Executives

Total

Female

9.5

9.0

6.6

4.2

9.1

Male

10.6

7.3

5.1

6.3

8.3

Philips Group

10.1

7.8

5.5

5.8

8.6

5.1.7Living wage

Philips can only deliver on its mission to improve the lives of 3 billion people by 2030 if we support and empower our people, so they can be their best and perform effectively. To this end, we conducted a living wage analysis on the lowest salaries in every country in which we currently operate.

The living wage is a concept defined by Anker and Anker (2017) as “Remuneration received by a worker in a particular place sufficient to afford a decent standard of living for the worker and her or his family. Elements of a decent standard of living include food, water, housing, education, health care, transport, clothing, and other essential needs, including provision for unexpected events”. To develop living wage standards that are complete and have a reliable geographical scope, we combined forces with Valuing Nature, several local NGOs, WageIndicator and other global corporates.

In 2019, we conducted an analysis of salaries and benefits for employees globally with respect to the living wage. The analysis covered 68 countries and we identified 31 employees in one country for whom wages and benefits were slightly below the defined living wage. Based on these results, our local HR teams will make relevant adjustments for the year 2020.

5.1.8Human rights

We believe that businesses have the responsibility to respect human rights and the ability to contribute to positive human rights impacts. Consistent with our commitment, as reflected in our policy, we do all that is reasonable and practicable to proactively identify and mitigate (potential) adverse human rights impacts in our operations and value chain. For many years already, our General Business Principles (GBP) have expressed our support and respect for human rights as set out in the International Bill of Human Rights and the International Labor Organization’s Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work. In this, we follow the guidance given in the United Nations Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights (UNGP) and the OECD Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises. Philips has also been a signatory to the UN Global Compact since 2007. Our commitment to respect human rights and avoid negative human rights impacts is led from the top. The avoidance of negative human rights impacts is on the agenda of the Sustainability Board, which meets quarterly.

In 2019, we created new channels of internal communication and developed a plan to advance training and awareness among our employees. Moreover, we further integrated human rights as part of our internal processes: we referenced additional human rights considerations in the Supplier Sustainability Program, acted upon the outcomes of our Human Rights Impact Assessment, and, based on that, explored how to advance our human rights due diligence globally. Our Human Rights Report contains detailed information regarding our progress and plans for continuous improvement.

5.1.9Total tax contribution

To deliver on our mission of making the world healthier and more sustainable through innovation, a responsible tax approach is required. We consider our tax payments as a contribution to the communities in which we operate, as part of our social value creation.

Our Tax Principles set the standard for our conduct, by which individual employees, the company and its subsidiaries must abide. We consider tax in the context of the broader society, inspired by our stakeholder dialogues, global initiatives of the OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development) and UN (United Nations), human rights, international (tax) laws and regulations and relevant codes of conduct.

Our Board of Management regularly reviews, evaluates, approves and where necessary adjusts Philips’ approach to tax. Furthermore, our approach to tax is supervised by the Audit Committee of the Supervisory Board.

Philips actively supports and participates in transparency initiatives such as the Dow Jones Sustainability Index (DJSI) and the Tax Transparency Benchmark of the Dutch Association of Investors for Sustainable Development (VBDO).

In 2019, Philips contributed to the communities where we operate through taxes paid (e.g. corporate income tax) and taxes collected (e.g. VAT, customs duty, payroll taxes). Philips' total tax contribution in 2019, amounting to EUR 3.1 billion, is described by tax type below:

Contribution by tax type

in millions of EUR

Chart visual

5.1.10General Business Principles

In the highly regulated world of healthcare, integrity requires in-depth knowledge of the applicable rules and regulations and a sensitivity to healthcare-specific issues. The Philips General Business Principles (GBP) incorporate and represent the fundamental principles by which all Philips businesses and employees around the globe must abide. They set the minimum standard for business conduct, both for individual employees and for the company and our subsidiaries. Our GBP also serve as a reference for the business conduct we expect from our business partners and suppliers.

Translations of the GBP text are available in 31 languages, allowing almost every employee to read the GBP in their native language. Detailed underlying policies, manuals, training, and tools are in place to give employees practical guidance on how to apply and uphold the GBP in their daily work environment. Details can be found at www.philips.com/gbp.

In 2019, a total of 545 concerns were reported via the Philips Ethics Line and through our network of GBP Compliance Officers. This represents a 24% increase over the previous reporting period (2018: 438 concerns reported).

This is a continuation of the upward trend reported since 2014, the year in which Philips updated its General Business Principles and deployed a strengthened global communication campaign. Specifically in 2019, we focused on increasing awareness on Integrity, and on the importance of speaking up through, and following, the deployment of our biennial Business Integrity Survey. We believe the upward trend in reporting remains in line with our multi-year efforts to encourage our employees to express their concerns, in combination with a growing workforce.

More information on the Philips GBP can be found in Risk management.

The results of the monitoring measures in place are given in General Business Principles

5.1.11Health and Safety

At Philips, we strive for an injury-free and illness-free work environment. Since 2016, the Total Recordable Cases (TRC) rate has been defined as a Key Performance Indicator (KPI). A TRC is a case where an injured employee is unable to work for one or more days, has medical treatment, or sustains an industrial illness. We set yearly TRC targets for the company, Businesses and industrial sites.

We recorded 224 TRCs in 2019, a 13% increase compared to 198 in 2018. While our workforce continued to expand in 2019, the TRC rate increased from 0.28 per hundred FTEs in 2018 to 0.30 in 2019.

In 2019 we recorded 103 Lost Workday Injury Cases (LWIC). These are occupational injury cases where an injured person is unable to work for one or more days after the injury. This represents a 13% increase compared with 91 in 2018. The LWIC rate increased to 0.14 per 100 FTEs in 2019, compared with 0.13 in 2018. The number of Lost Workdays caused by injuries decreased by 17 days (0.4%) to 4,633 days in 2019.

For more information on Health and Safety, please refer to Health and Safety performance

5.1.12Working with stakeholders

In organizing ourselves around customers and markets, we conduct dialogues with our stakeholders in order to explore common ground for addressing societal challenges, building partnerships and jointly developing supporting ecosystems for our innovations around the world.

An overview of stakeholders and topics discussed is provided in Sustainability statements.

For more information on our stakeholder engagement activities in 2019, please refer to Stakeholder engagement.

5.2Environmental performance

Our latest five-year sustainability program, ‘Healthy people, Sustainable planet’, was launched in 2016. It addresses both social and environmental challenges and includes associated targets to be achieved by 2020.

Besides our social impact, focusing on SDG 3, described in the previous section, we have an environmental impact through our global operations, but even more so through our products and solutions. This is our contribution to SDG 12 (Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns) and to SDG 13 (Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts).

In this Environmental performance section an overview is given of the most important environmental parameters of the 'Healthy people, Sustainable planet' program. Details can be found in the Sustainability statements.

Environmental impact

Since 1990, Philips has been performing Life-Cycle Assessments (LCAs). These LCAs provide insight into the lifetime environmental impact of our products and are used to steer our EcoDesign efforts and to grow our Green Solutions portfolio. As a logical next step, we have measured our environmental impact on society at large via a so-called Environmental Profit & Loss (EP&L) account, which includes the hidden environmental costs associated with our activities and products. It supports the direction of our 'Healthy people, Sustainable planet' program by providing insights into the main environmental hotspots and innovation areas to reduce the environmental impact of our products and solutions.

The EP&L account is based on LCA methodology, in which the environmental impacts are expressed in monetary terms using conversion factors developed by CE Delft. These conversion factors are subject to further refinement and are expected to change over time. We used expert opinions and estimates for some parts of the calculations. The figures reported are Philips’ best possible estimates. As we gain new insights and retrieve more and better data, we will enhance the methodology, use cases and accuracy of results in the future. For more information we refer to our methodology report.

An important learning that we derived from the 2017 and 2018 EP&L is that, in addition to the conversion factors, the definition of the use case scenarios also has a significant impact on the result. This is especially true of consumer products which have large sales volumes, long lifetimes and frequently high energy consumption (e.g. haircare products and steam irons). It is our aim to look into the feasibility of standardizing the use cases and calculation of the yearly energy consumption.

The current EP&L account only includes the hidden environmental costs. It does not yet include the benefits to society that Philips generates by improving people’s lives through our products and solutions. We have a well-established methodology to calculate the number of lives we positively touch with our products and solutions. It is our aim to look into valuing these societal benefits in monetary terms as well and include them in our future EP&L account.

Results 2019

In 2019, Philips reduced its environmental impact from EUR 7.5 billion to EUR 7.25 billion, a 3% improvement compared to 2018. The main environmental impact, 88% of the total, is related to the usage of our products, which is due to electricity consumption. Particulate matter formation and climate change are the main environmental impacts, accounting for 43% and 28% respectively of the total impact. The environmental costs include the environmental impact of the full lifetime of the products that we put on the market in 2019, e.g. 10 years in the case of a medical system or 7 years of usage in the case of a domestic appliance. As we grow our portfolio of Green Products and Solutions, we expect the environmental impact to reduce.

Of the total 2019 impact, just EUR 154 million (2%) is directly caused by Philips’ own operations, mainly driven by outbound logistics. Compared to EUR 175 million in 2018, this is an 11% reduction, mainly due to a shift from air freight to ocean freight.

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The environmental costs have been positively influenced by our long-term EcoDesign efforts to increase the energy efficiency of our products and sales mix changes, reducing the impact during the use phase from EUR 6.5 billion in 2018 to EUR 6.3 billion in 2019. Our supply chain currently has an environmental impact of some EUR 720 million, which is 10% of our total environmental impact. The main contributors are the electronic components, cables and steel used in our products. Through our Circular Economy and Supplier Sustainability programs we will continue to focus on reducing the environmental impact caused by the materials we source and apply in our products.

In order to deliver on our carbon neutrality commitment, we have set ambitious reduction targets. In 2018, we were the first health technology company to have its 2020-2040 targets (including the use phase of our products) approved by the Science Based Targets initiative – a collaboration between CDP (formerly Carbon Disclosure Project), the United Nations Global Compact (UNGC), the World Resources Institute (WRI) and the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) aimed at driving ambitious corporate climate action. Approval confirms that Philips’ long-term targets are in line with the level of decarbonization required to keep the global temperature increase below 2 °C.

5.2.1Green Innovation

Green Innovation is the Research & Development spend related to the development of new generations of Green Products and Solutions and Green Technologies, addressing SDG 12 (Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns).

Sustainable Innovation is the Research & Development spend related to the development of new generations of products and solutions that address the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals 3 (Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages) or 12. With regard to Sustainable Innovation spend, Philips set a target of EUR 7.5 billion (cumulative) for the period 2016-2020 as part of the ‘Healthy people, Sustainable planet’ program.

In 2019, Philips invested EUR 235 million in Green Innovation and some EUR 1.6 billion in Sustainable Innovation.

Philips Group

Green Innovation per segment

in millions of EUR

2017 - 2019

Chart visual

Diagnosis & Treatment businesses

Philips develops innovative diagnosis and treatment solutions that support precision diagnosis and effective, minimally invasive interventions and therapy, while respecting the boundaries of natural resources. Investments in Green Innovation in 2019 amounted to EUR 110 million, a significant increase compared to 2018. All Philips Green Focal Areas are taken into account as we aim to reduce environmental impact over the total lifecycle. Energy efficiency is an area of focus, especially for our large imaging systems such as MRI. Philips also pays particular attention to enabling upgrading pathways, so our customers can benefit from enhancements in workflow, dose management and imaging quality with the equipment they already own. Our Diagnosis & Treatment businesses actively support a voluntary industry initiative with European trade association COCIR to improve the energy efficiency and material efficiency of medical imaging equipment, as well as lowering its hazardous substances content. Moreover, we are actively partnering with multiple leading care providers to look together for innovative ways to reduce the environmental impact of healthcare, for example by maximizing energy-efficient use of medical equipment and optimizing lifecycle value. Additionally, Philips aims to close the loop on all large medical equipment that becomes available to us by the end of 2020, and to extend circular practices to all medical equipment by 2025. To achieve this target, we will actively drive trade-ins in markets where de-install, trade-in and reverse logistics capabilities are in place, and build these capabilities in countries that do not yet have them.

Connected Care businesses

Philips’ connected health IT solutions integrate, collect, combine and deliver quality data for actionable insights to help improve access to quality care, while respecting the boundaries of natural resources. It is our belief that well-designed e-health solutions can reduce the travel-related carbon footprint of healthcare, increase efficiency in hospitals, and improve access to care and outcomes. Investments in Green Innovation in 2019 amounted to EUR 21 million. Green Innovation projects delivered, among other things, new green patient monitors in 2019, with lower environmental footprints reflecting all the Philips Green Focal Areas. Energy efficiency and material reduction are the main areas of focus.

Personal Health businesses

The continued high level of R&D investments at our Personal Health businesses is also reflected in the Green Innovation spend, which amounted to EUR 99 million in 2019, compared with EUR 86 million in 2018. The Personal Health businesses continued their work on improving the energy efficiency of their products, closing the materials loop (e.g. by using recycled materials in products and packaging) and the voluntary phase-out of polyvinyl chloride (PVC), brominated flame retardants (BFR), Bisphenol A (BPA) and phthalates from, among others, food contact products. Mother & Child Care introduced a reusable sterilization box for soothers and breastfeeding accessories, eliminating the need for separate packaging. In our Oral Healthcare portfolio, we have been able to achieve a 40% average packaging reduction for the Protective Clean products for US retail. In our Garment Care portfolio, we launched our first green optimal-temperature pressurized steam generator; this energy-efficient product contains recycled plastic and is free of PVC and BFR.

Other

The segment Other invested EUR 5 million in Green Innovation, spread over projects focused on global challenges relating to water, air, energy, food, Circular Economy, and access to affordable healthcare.

Circular Economy

For a sustainable world, the transition from a linear to a circular economy is essential. A circular economy aims to decouple economic growth from the use of natural resources and ecosystems by using these resources more effectively. It is a driver of innovation in the areas of material, component and product re-use, as well as new business models such as system solutions and services. At Philips, we have set ambitious targets to guide this journey. By 2020, we want 15% of our revenues to come from circular products and services, and we want to send zero waste to landfill in our own operations. At the beginning of 2018, we added a pledge to take back and repurpose all the large medical systems equipment (e.g. MRI and CT scanners) that our customers are prepared to return to us, and to extend those practices across our professional portfolio by 2025. As of 2019, we are well on track to achieve our ambitious circular economy goals.

For more information on our Circular Economy activities and the progress towards targets in 2019, please refer to Circular Economy.

5.2.2Green Revenues

Green Revenues are generated through products and solutions that offer a significant environmental improvement in one or more Green Focal Areas: Energy efficiency, Packaging, Hazardous substances, Weight, Circularity, and Lifetime reliability, and thereby deliver a contribution to SDG 12 (Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns). Green Revenues increased to EUR 13.1 billion in 2019, or 67.2% of sales (63.7% in 2018), reaching again a record level for Philips.

Philips Group

Green Revenues per segment

in millions of EUR unless otherwise stated

2017 - 2019

Chart visual

Through our EcoDesign process we aim to create products and solutions that have significantly less impact on the environment during their whole lifecycle. Overall, the most significant improvements have been realized in energy efficiency, although there was also growing attention given to hazardous substances and recyclability in all segments in 2019, the latter driven by our Circular Economy initiatives.

Diagnosis & Treatment businesses

In 2019, our Diagnosis & Treatment businesses maintained their Green Products and Solutions portfolio with redesigns of various Green Products with further environmental improvements. These products improve patient outcomes, provide better value, and help secure access to high-quality care, while reducing environmental impact. A good example is BlueSeal magnet technology, which is designed to reduce lengthy and costly disruptions in MRI practice, and help healthcare facilities transition to more productive and sustainable almost helium-free operations.

Connected Care businesses

Our Connected Care businesses continued to develop their Green Products and Solutions portfolio in 2019. New patient monitors and the MMX multi-measurement module came onto the market with lower energy usage thanks to the introduction of an ambient light sensor, improved power supply (MX750, 28% reduction in energy usage) and optimization for battery use. The IntelliVue X3, MX100 and MMX patient monitor platforms feature lower energy usage (18%) and reduced product and packaging weight (11% and 25% respectively) compared to their predecessor products.

Personal Health businesses

Our Personal Health businesses focus on Green Products and Solutions that meet or exceed our minimum requirements in the areas of energy consumption, packaging, substances of concern, and application of recycled plastics. Green Revenues in 2019 amounted to 63% of total sales, compared to 62% in 2018. We continue to make steady progress in developing PVC/BFR-free products. More than 75% of our consumer product sales consist of PVC/BFR-free products, with the exception of the power cords, for which there are not yet economically viable alternatives available. Through ongoing scouting and collaboration with our suppliers we have been able to achieve a breakthrough in PVC/BFR-free performance for our Haircare portfolio, from around 5% in 2017 to over 15% in 2019. In our Kitchen Appliances portfolio, we stepped up the application of recycled plastic for our Eole and Viva/Bond Airfryers, switching over from virgin plastic to recycled plastic for the internal housing parts.

5.2.3Sustainable Operations

Philips’ Sustainable Operations programs focus on the main contributors to climate change, recycling of waste, reduction of water consumption, and reduction of emissions.

Full details can be found in Sustainability statements.

Carbon footprint and energy efficiency

At Philips, we see climate change as a serious threat. Therefore, we are taking action to rethink our business models and decouple economic growth from the impact we have on the environment. This will not only benefit the environment, but will positively impact social and economic aspects as well.

We have the ambition to become carbon-neutral in our operations, sourcing all our electricity from 100% renewable sources by year-end 2020, and our efforts are being acknowledged. We report our climate performance to CDP (formerly known as the Carbon Disclosure Project), a global NGO that assesses the greenhouse gas (GHG) emission performance and management of reporting companies, and have been ranked on the CDP Climate Change 'A' List for our continued climate performance and transparency for the seventh year in a row. We have set ambitious emission reduction targets to ensure we contribute to limiting the impact of global warming, not only in our operations, but throughout our value chain – collaborating with suppliers and customers to amplify our impact. That is why Philips has set new long-term emission reduction targets, which have been assessed and approved by the Science Based Targets initiative (SBTi). Locking down our commitment to driving climate action across the value chain and ensuring that we contribute to deliver on the decarbonization required to keep the global temperature increase well below 2 °C.

In 2019, our operational carbon footprint resulted in 706 kilotonnes of carbon dioxide-equivalent (CO2-e), a decrease of 10% compared to 2018, mainly driven by increased use of electricity from renewable sources and a significant reduction in air freight. As a result of our carbon neutrality program, some of our emissions have been compensated via carbon offsets, resulting in a total of 266 kilotonnes carbon dioxide-equivalent (CO2-e).

Philips reports all its emissions in line with the Greenhouse Gas Protocol (GHGP) as further described in Data definitions and scope.

Philips Group

Net operational carbon footprint

in kilotonnes CO2 -equivalent

2015 - 2019

Chart visual

In 2019, our operational carbon intensity (in tonnes CO2e/EUR million sales) improved by 17%, even as our company recorded 4.5% comparable sales growth*). This still excludes the acquired carbon offsets. As part of our ‘Healthy people, Sustainable planet’ program we are continuing our efforts to decouple economic growth from our environmental impact.

In our sites we achieved significant reductions in our scope 2 (indirect) emissions, mainly driven by an increase in global renewable electricity share from 90% in 2018 to 95% in 2019. All our US operations were already powered by renewable electricity from the Los Mirasoles wind farm. Then, in 2019, the Krammer and Bouwdokken wind farms in the Dutch province of Zeeland, with which we closed long-term contracts through our renewable electricity purchasing consortium with Nouryon, DSM and Google, powered all our operations in the Netherlands. Combined with the Los Mirasoles wind farm, this covers some 49% of our total electricity demand. Combined with the achieved energy reductions, this led to a 26% reduction in emissions from our energy consumption (scope 1 and scope 2 market-based) in 2019 compared to 2018.

Our business travel emissions, covering emissions from air travel, lease cars and rental cars, increased by 2.8% compared to 2018. We recorded a 3% reduction in our air travel emissions as a result of, among other things, our 2019 'Fly Less, Travel Smarter' campaign. This campaign was initiated to further reduce our business travel emissions by installing more online collaboration rooms as an alternative to travel, stimulating behavioral change via our Global Connect Challenge, and promoting alternative modes of transport. The emission reduction in air travel was mitigated by an 18% increase in emissions from our lease car fleet, mainly caused by an increase in fleet size combined with the implementation of the new improved Worldwide Harmonized Light Vehicle Test Procedure (WLTP). Emissions resulting from rental cars decreased by 11% compared to 2018.

In 2019, we recorded a 12% decrease in emissions in our overall logistics operations compared to 2018. We reduced overall emissions from air freight by 21% and from ocean freight by 8%. Emissions from parcel shipments increased by 22% and from road transport by 8%. To take a tangible step towards the decarbonization of ocean shipping, Philips joined other Dutch multinationals FrieslandCampina, Heineken, DSM, Shell and Unilever - all members of the Dutch Sustainable Growth Coalition (DSGC) - in the world's largest maritime biofuel pilot. It used up to 20% sustainable second-generation biofuels on a large triple-E ocean vessel, which set sail in March 2019 from Rotterdam to Shanghai and back on biofuel blends alone. This project was a world first on this scale, saving 1,500 tonnes CO2-equivalent and 20,000 kilograms of sulphur.

Although reduction is key to achieving carbon neutrality, unavoidable carbon emissions require offsetting in order to gradually drive down our emissions to zero by year-end 2020. We do this by financing projects in emerging regions that have a strong link with UN Sustainable Development Goals 3 (Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages) and 12 (Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns). In 2019, we increased this to 440 kilotonnes, equivalent to the annual uptake of approximately 13 million medium-sized oak trees. This covers the total emissions of our direct emissions in our sites, all our business travel emissions and all our ocean, road and parcel shipments within logistics. We do this by financing carbon reduction projects in emerging regions that drive social, economic and additional environmental progress for the communities in which they operate, such as:

Providing access to safe drinking water while reducing wood consumption

These carbon emission reduction projects will provide millions of liters of safe drinking water in Uganda and Ethiopia and will reduce the mortality risk from water-borne diseases. Additionally, less wood will be required for boiling water, leading to less indoor air pollution and slowing down the deforestation rate.

Fighting against respiratory diseases and deforestation by means of clean cookstoves

By financing highly efficient cookstoves in Kenya and Uganda, less wood will be required for cooking, leading to lower carbon emissions, a reduction in diseases caused by indoor air pollution, and a lower deforestation rate in these regions.

Providing access to clean energy while improving health and education

This project will reduce the demand-supply gap in the Dewas region in India and will provide renewable energy to more than 50,000 households. The project will also provide a mobile medical unit in 24 villages, giving diagnosis and medicines free of charge twice a month. Additional funding will be provided for educational programs and improved sanitation facilities in five local schools in order to maximize the social impact.

Philips Group

Operational carbon footprint by scope

in kilotonnes CO2-equivalent unless otherwise stated

2015 - 2019

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

Scope 1

39

42

38

40

35

Scope 2 (market based)

106

121

58

25

14

Scope 2 (location based)

212

252

225

227

203

Scope 3

612

649

785

721

657

Total (scope 1, 2 (market based), and 3)

757

812

881

786

706

Emissions compensated by carbon offset projects

-

-

220

330

440

Net operational carbon emissions

757

812

661

456

266

Operational CO2e efficiency in tonnes CO2e/mln EUR sales

46.6

47.9

47.5

43.4

36.2

During 2019, the applied emission factors used to calculate our operational carbon footprint remained unchanged compared to 2018. Philips reports all its emissions in line with the Greenhouse Gas Protocol (GHGP) as further described in Data definitions and scope. Due to new insights and improved calculation methodologies, the emission results from air freight and air travel have been restated historically.

Philips Group

Energy consumption1)

in terajoules (TJ) unless otherwise stated

2015 - 2019

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

Total electricity consumption

1,809

1,742

1,560

1,582

1,531

Fuel consumption

782

652

558

603

550

Purchased heat, steam and cooling

67

83

48

61

60

Total energy

1,658

2,477

2,166

2,246

2,141

Renewable electricity

965

986

1,228

1,423

1,450

Renewable electricity share

53%

57%

79%

90%

95%

Renewable energy share

36%

40%

57%

63%

68%

Operational energy efficiency in TJ/mln EUR sales

0.16

0.15

0.12

0.12

0.11

Water

In 2019, Philips was ranked on the CDP Water Security 'A' List for the first time. Along with our 'A' score for Climate Leadership, this makes us one of the few European companies to receive a double 'A' score. Total water intake in 2019 was 890,000 m3, comparable to 2018. Personal Health, which consumes 50% of total water usage, recorded a 1% increase. The increase was mainly due to production volume increases at one manufacturing site in Asia, partly mitigated by two manufacturing sites in Europe. Diagnosis & Treatment showed an increase of 2%, mainly caused by the inclusion of a new reporting site. Connected Care showed a decrease of 7% due to a change in organizational footprint.

Philips Group

Water intake

in thousands of m3

2015 - 2019

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

Diagnosis & Treatment

268

269

312

288

295

Connected Care

172

152

168

161

150

Personal Health

536

542

408

442

445

Philips Group

976

963

888

891

890

In 2019, 99% of water was purchased and 1% was extracted from groundwater wells.

Waste

In 2019, our manufacturing sites generated 26.4 kilotonnes of waste, an increase of 8% compared to 2018, mainly driven by construction activities in different locations. The Diagnosis & Treatment businesses increased their waste by 15% (construction activities, operational changes and one new reporting site), now constituting 37% of total waste; Connected Care increased by 3% (construction activities and operational changes); Personal Health increased by 4% (increased production and warehouse clean-up), now constituting 48% of total waste.

Philips Group

Total waste

in kilotonnes

2015 - 2019

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

Diagnosis & Treatment

8.0

9.2

8.3

8.4

9.7

Connected Care

3.6

3.5

3.9

4.0

4.1

Personal Health

11.6

12.2

12.4

12.1

12.6

Philips Group

23.2

24.9

24.6

24.5

26.4

Total waste consists of waste that is delivered for landfill, incineration or recycling. Our sites are addressing both the recycling percentage as well as waste sent to landfill as part of the ‘Healthy people, Sustainable planet’ program. Materials delivered for recycling via an external contractor amounted to 21.9 kilotonnes, which equals 83% of total waste, comparable to 2018 (84%). In some countries, construction waste is regulated and has to go to landfill, which impacted the recycling rate in 2019 negatively. Of the 17% remaining (not recycled) waste, 81% comprised non-hazardous waste and 19% hazardous waste. Our Zero Waste to Landfill KPI excludes one-time-only waste and waste delivered to landfill due to regulatory requirements. According to this definition, in 2019 we reported 1.3 kilotonnes of waste sent to landfill, a reduction of 24% compared to 2018. 19 out of our 35 industrial sites achieved Zero Waste to Landfill status.

Philips Group

Industrial waste delivered for recycling

in %

2019

Chart visual

Philips included reduction targets for the substances that are most relevant for its businesses in its ‘Healthy people, Sustainable planet’ program. In order to provide comparable information at Group level, please find below a summary of the emissions of the formerly targeted substances. Emissions of restricted substances were again zero in 2019. The level of emissions of hazardous substances decreased from 3,363 kilos in 2018 to 2,521 kilos in 2019 (-25%), mainly driven by the reduction in styrene emissions in the Personal Health businesses.

Philips Group

Restricted and hazardous substances

in kilos

2015 - 2019

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

Restricted substances

18

1

0

0

0

Hazardous substances

22,394

10,496

5,243

3,363

2,521

For more details on emissions from substances, please refer to Sustainable Operations.

*)Non-IFRS financial measure. For the definition and reconciliation of the most directly comparable IFRS measure, refer to Reconciliation of non-IFRS information.

6Risk management

6.1Our approach to risk management

Vision and objectives

Philips believes risk management is a value-creating activity that complements our innovation and entrepreneurship. Philips’ risk management approach is part of the Philips Business System (PBS) and is articulated through our governance (accountabilities and roles), our policies on Risk Appetite, our risk management process standard and Philips Business Control Framework, and our General Business Principles (GBP). These are further described in this chapter. The company’s risk management is designed to provide reasonable assurance that strategic and operational objectives are met, legal requirements are complied with, and the integrity of the company’s financial reporting and related disclosures is safeguarded. However, there can be no absolute assurance that our risk management will avoid or mitigate all risks that Philips faces. The main risks are described in Risk factors.

All forward-looking statements made on or after the date of this Annual Report and attributable to Philips are expressly qualified, in their entirety, by the factors described in the cautionary statement included in Forward-looking statements and other information and in the overview of risk factors described in Risk factors.

Risk management governance

The Executive Committee oversees, identifies and manages the risks Philips faces in executing its strategy. It also defines the Risk Appetite and provides the risk management framework, as well as monitoring the latter’s effectiveness. The Risk Management Support Team, consisting of several functional experts covering the various categories of enterprise risk, supports the Executive Committee through regular analysis of the enterprise risk profile and improvement of the risk management framework. Management is responsible for identifying critical risks and implementing appropriate risk responses within their area of responsibility. Various functions (such as Internal Control, Quality & Regulatory, Group Security) support management of specific risk areas.

The Internal Audit function assesses the quality of risk management and controls through the execution of a risk-based audit plan, as approved by the Audit Committee of the Supervisory Board. Leadership from the Board of Management, Executive Committee, Businesses, Markets and key Functions meet with Internal Audit each quarter in Audit & Risk Committees to discuss strengths and weaknesses of risk management and controls – as evaluated by internal and external auditors and other (self) assessments – and take corrective action where necessary.

The Disclosure Committee oversees the company’s disclosure activities and assists the Board of Management in fulfilling its responsibilities in this respect. The Committee’s purpose is to ensure that the company implements and maintains internal procedures for the timely collection, evaluation and disclosure, as appropriate, of information potentially subject to public disclosure under the legal, regulatory and stock exchange requirements to which the company is subject.

The Security Steering Committee (SSC) and the Group Security function manage security (including cybersecurity) risks at Philips. The SSC evaluates and sets the Group’s security strategy, issues security policies and evaluates progress and effectiveness. Dedicated security reports are shared with the Board of Management, Executive Committee, Supervisory Board and external auditors. On a quarterly basis, briefings on cybersecurity risks are provided to the IT Audit & Risk Committee.

The Audit Committee and the Quality & Regulatory Committee of the Supervisory Board assist the Supervisory Board in fulfilling its oversight responsibilities. The quality of risk management and controls, and the findings of internal and external audits, are reported to, and discussed with, the Audit Committee of the Supervisory Board. The Quality & Regulatory Committee’s role particularly relates to the quality, including regulatory compliance, of the company’s products (including software), services and systems and their development, testing, manufacturing, marketing and servicing.

In Corporate governance the company addresses the main elements of its corporate governance structure, reports on how it applies the principles and best practices of the Dutch Corporate Governance Code, and provides certain other information.

Risk appetite

The Executive Committee and management seek to manage risks consistently within the risk appetite. Risk appetite is set by the Executive Committee and described in the risk management policy. It is effectuated as an integral part of our PBS, various elements of which – such as Strategy, Behaviors, GBP, Authority schedules, Policies, Process standards and Performance management systems – include or reflect risk taking guidance.

Philips’ risk appetite differs depending on the type of risk, ranging from an entrepreneurial to a mitigating approach. We believe we must operate within the dynamics of the health technology industry and take the risks needed to ensure we continually revitalize our offerings and the way we work. At the same time, Philips attaches prime importance to integrity, product quality and safety, including compliance with regulations and quality standards. Risk appetite for the four main risk categories is visualized below.

Philips does not classify these risk categories in order of importance.

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Risk Management

In order to provide a comprehensive view of Philips’ risks, structured risk assessments take place according to the Philips risk management process standard, applying a top-down and bottom-up approach. The process is supported by workshops with management at Group, Business, Market and Group Function levels. During 2019, several risk management workshops were held.

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Key elements of the Philips risk management policy are:

  • Management of Businesses, Markets and key Functions perform a risk assessment at least once a year, taking their strategic plan into consideration. Risks are assessed and prioritized based on impact, likelihood and effectiveness of controls, and appropriate risk responses are implemented;
  • Management monitors developments in the risk profile and risk response effectiveness, which are discussed each quarter in Audit & Risk Committees and Performance Reviews;
  • As an integral part of the strategy review, each year the Executive Committee assesses the enterprise risk profile and reviews the potential risk impact versus group risk appetite. This risk assessment takes into account various inputs such as risk assessments of Businesses, Markets and Functions, findings from Philips Internal Audit, Legal and Insurance, the materiality analysis (refer to Sustainability statements), views from management and external research;
  • Developments in the enterprise risk profile and management’s initiatives to improve risk responses are also discussed and monitored during the quarterly meeting of the Audit Committee of the Supervisory Board;
  • At least once a year the Executive Committee reviews the Philips risk management policy, including risk appetite, and the risk management approach, and improves the risk management framework as and when required;
  • The Philips risk management policy, risk profile and the risk management framework are discussed at least once a year with the Audit Committee of the Supervisory Board and with the full Supervisory Board.

Examples of measures taken during 2019 to further strengthen risk management:

  • Update of Philips Business System, including the risk management policy and standard, with more explicit requirements for management of risk, compliance requirements and controls;
  • Establishment of a Risk & Compliance Center of Excellence to drive knowledge sharing, standardization and transparency;
  • Improvement of ERM performance reporting and more explicit connection of enterprise risks in the strategic performance review;
  • Increased use of data analytics in controls monitoring and process mining to identify deviations from standard;
  • Establishment of a Group Security function to more closely align and coordinate security management efforts;
  • Continued development of the Information Security Program in view of the increasing exposure to cybercrime and information security requirements resulting from digitalization and our strategic focus as a health technology company;
  • The potential impact of challenging global political and economic developments on our results were closely monitored, evaluated and addressed by implementing mitigating actions to the extent possible;
  • Continued significant investments in the Quality Management System across the company. Changes have been made to the company-wide quality leadership, and new standards and initiatives have been launched.

Philips Business Control Framework

The Philips Business Control Framework (PBCF) sets the standard for Internal Control over Financial Reporting at Philips. The objective of the PBCF is to maintain integrated management control of the company’s operations in order to ensure the integrity of the financial reporting, as well as compliance with laws and regulations. Philips has designed its PBCF based on the Internal Control-Integrated Framework (2013) established by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO).

As part of the PBCF, Philips has implemented a standard set of internal controls over financial reporting. Together with Philips’ established accounting procedures, this standard set of internal controls is designed to provide reasonable assurance that assets are safeguarded, that the books and records properly reflect transactions necessary to permit preparation of financial statements, that policies and procedures are carried out by qualified personnel, and that published financial statements are properly prepared and do not contain any material misstatements. In each unit, management is responsible for customizing the controls set for their business, risk profile and operations.

Each year, management’s accountability for internal controls for financial reporting is evidenced through the formal certification statement sign-off. Any deficiencies noted in the design and operating effectiveness of Internal Controls over Financial Reporting which were not completely remediated, are evaluated at year-end by the Board of Management. The Board of Management’s report, including its conclusions regarding the effectiveness of Internal Controls over Financial Reporting, can be found in Management’s report on internal control.

Philips General Business Principles (GBP)

As part of the Philips Business System, our GBP set the standard for our business conduct and have been enhanced in 2019 to more clearly reflect our health technology strategy. The GBP form an integral part of labor contracts in virtually every country in which Philips operates, and translations are available in 31 languages. Each year, employees reconfirm their commitment to the code of conduct after completing their GBP e-learning, while there is an additional annual sign-off for Executives, Finance and Procurement staff. Detailed underlying policies, manuals, training, and tools are in place to give employees practical guidance on how to apply and uphold the GBP in their daily work.

One of the policies underlying the GBP is the Financial Code of Ethics which applies to designated senior executives, including the Chief Executive Officer and the Chief Financial Officer and to the Senior Management in the Philips Finance Leadership team who head up the finance departments of the company.

The GBP Review Committee is ultimately responsible for the effective deployment of the GBP and for generally promoting a culture of compliance and ethics within the company. The Committee is chaired by the Chief Legal Officer, and its members include the Chief HR Officer, the Chief of International Markets and the Chief Financial Officer. Furthermore, all of our 17 markets have quarterly market compliance committees, which act as local satellites of the GBP Review Committee, dealing with GBP-related matters within the local context. They are also responsible for the design and execution of localized compliance plans that are tailored to their market-specific risks and organizational set-up. The Secretariat of the GBP Review Committee, together with a worldwide network of GBP Compliance Officers, supports the organization with the implementation of GBP initiatives.

As part of our continuous effort to raise GBP awareness and foster dialogue throughout the organization, each year a global GBP communications and training plan is deployed, including our annual GBP Dialogue Initiative, aimed at reinforcing a culture of dialogue while practicing with ethical dilemmas that are relevant for our workforce.

A key control to measure implementation of our GBP is the GBP Self-Assessment, which is part of our Internal Control framework. Following the 2018 review, this enhanced control was re-deployed throughout the organization in the first half of 2019. In addition, we again bolstered the resources of our legal compliance monitoring team in Chennai, India, serving both our business customers as well as compliance networks with actionable compliance data, thus further improving our compliance control framework.

The GBP are supported by established mechanisms that ensure standardized reporting and enable both employees and third parties to escalate concerns 24/7. Concerns raised are registered consistently in a single database hosted outside of Philips servers to ensure confidentiality and security of identity and information. Encouraging people to speak up through the available channels if they have a concern will continue to be a cornerstone of our GBP communications and awareness campaigns.

Through the Audit Committee of the Supervisory Board, the company also has procedures in place for the receipt, retention and treatment of complaints specifically relating to accounting, internal accounting controls or auditing matters. The Reporting Policy Accounting and Audit Matters allows the confidential, anonymous submission of complaints regarding questionable accounting or auditing matters.

The GBP and underlying policies, including the Financial Code of Ethics, are published on the company website, at www.philips.com/gbp.

6.2Risk factors

Philips believes the risks set out below are the material risks that could impact its ability to achieve its objectives. These risk factors may not, however, include all the risks that ultimately affect Philips. Some risks not yet known to Philips, or currently believed not to be material, may ultimately have a major impact on Philips’ business, revenues, income, assets, liquidity, capital resources and/or ability to achieve its business objectives. Philips defines risks in four main categories: Strategic, Operational, Compliance and Financial risks. Philips presents the risk factors within each risk category in order of Philips’ current view of their expected significance. Describing risk factors in their order of expected significance within each risk category does not mean that a lower listed risk factor may not have a material and adverse impact on Philips’ business, revenues, income, assets, liquidity, capital resources and/or ability to achieve its business objectives. Furthermore, a risk factor listed below other risk factors may ultimately prove to have more significant adverse consequences than those other risk factors.

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6.3Strategic risks

Philips may be unable to adapt swiftly to changes in industry or market circumstances.

Fundamental shifts in the health technology industry, such as the transition to digital and increased emphasis on sustainability, may drastically change the business environment in which Philips operates. The inability of Philips to recognize these changes in good time, adjust its business models, or introduce new products and services in response to these changes or other circumstances such as pricing actions by competitors, could result in a material adverse effect on Philips’ business, financial condition and operating results.

Philips global operations are exposed to economic and political changes that could adversely impact its financial condition and results.

Philips’ business environment is influenced by political and economic conditions in individual and global markets. Mature economies are currently the main source of revenues, while emerging economies are an increasing source of revenues. Philips sources its products and services mainly from the US, EU (primarily the Netherlands) and China, and the majority of Philips’ assets are located in these geographies. In particular, Philips expects that disruption due to coronavirus (COVID-19) in China and elsewhere will have a negative impact on its results of operations and on supply chains involving the relevant jurisdictions.

Changes in monetary policy and trade and tax laws in the US, China and EU can have a significant adverse impact on other mature economies, emerging economies and international financial markets. Such changes, including tariffs and sanctions, may trigger reactions and countermeasures, leading to adverse impacts on global trade levels and flows, economic growth and political stability, all of which may have an adverse effect on business growth and stability on international financial markets. Furthermore it is uncertain whether Philips will be able to pass on any additional costs resulting from these events to its customers.

The changes (and the potential impacts of such changes) which are described above, or other factors which may impact economic conditions relevant to Philips, including US, Chinese and EU macro-economic outlook, foreign policy, monetary policy, healthcare budget, trade and tax laws, measures adopted with respect to sustainability and climate change, and the impact of local or global health events, are difficult to predict. Philips may encounter difficulty in planning and managing operations due to a lack of adequate infrastructure, foreign currency fluctuations, import or export controls, increased healthcare regulation, nationalization of assets or restrictions on the repatriation of returns from foreign investments. Economic and political uncertainty may have a material adverse impact on Philips’ business, financial condition and operating results and can also make it more difficult for Philips to budget and make financial forecasts accurately. Instability and volatility in international financial markets could have a negative impact on Philips’ access to funding. Uncertainty remains as to the levels of (public) capital expenditure in general, unemployment levels, and consumer and business confidence, all of which could adversely affect demand for products and services offered by Philips. Given that growth in emerging economies is broadly correlated to US, Chinese and European economic growth and that such emerging economies are increasingly important to Philips’ business operations, the above-mentioned risks are also expected to grow and could have an increasingly material adverse effect on Philips’ financial condition and results.

Philips’ overall risk profile is changing as a result of its focus on health technology.

As Philips’ business profile shifts to focus on health technology, with a changing products and services portfolio and acquisitions, dispositions and partnerships to support the execution of its health technology strategy, Philips is more exposed to developments in the health technology industry. It may therefore have a reduced ability to offset potential negative impacts of those developments through a more diversified portfolio. As Philips transitions from selling health technology products to selling health technology solutions, the nature of our customer relations is also evolving, which raises the long-term risk of (amongst others) customer default and dependency. Dispositions consistent with Philips’ focus on health technology, including in relation to Philips’ domestic appliances business, may result in additional costs and divert management attention from other business priorities and risks, and the timing, terms, execution and proceeds of any such dispositions are uncertain.

Philips’ overall performance in the coming years is depending on the realization of its growth ambitions and results in growth geographies.

Growth geographies are becoming increasingly important to Philips’ business plan, and Asia is an important production, sourcing and design center for Philips. Philips faces intense competition from local companies as well as other global players for market share in growth geographies. Philips needs to maintain and grow its position in growth geographies, invest in data-driven services, invest in local talent, understand developments in end-user preferences, and localize its portfolio in order to stay competitive in these growth geographies. If Philips fails to achieve these objectives, it could have a material adverse effect on the company’s business, financial condition and operating results.

Philips may not control joint ventures or associated companies in which it holds interests or invests, which could limit the ability of Philips to identify and manage risks.

Philips may from time to time hold interests and investments in joint ventures and associated companies in which it has a non-controlling interest and may continue to do so. In these cases, Philips has limited influence over, and limited or no control of, the governance, performance and cost of operations of the joint ventures and associated companies. Some of these joint ventures and associated companies may represent significant investments and potentially also use the Philips brand. The joint ventures and associated companies that Philips does not control may make business, financial or investment decisions contrary to Philips’ interests or may make decisions different from those that Philips itself may have made. Additionally, Philips’ partners or members of a particular joint venture or associated company may not be able to meet their financial or other obligations, which could expose Philips to additional financial or other obligations, as well as having a material adverse effect on the value of its investments in those entities or potentially subjecting Philips to additional claims.

Acquisitions could expose Philips to integration risks which may negatively impact Philips’ return on investment.

Selected acquisitions have been and are expected to be a part of Philips’ growth strategy. Acquisitions may expose Philips to integration risks in areas such as sales and service force integration, logistics, regulatory compliance, information technology and finance. Integration difficulties and complexity may adversely impact the realization of increased contributions from acquisitions. Philips may incur significant acquisition, administrative and other costs in connection with these transactions, including costs related to the integration of acquired businesses. Acquisitions may also divert management attention from other business priorities and risks. Cost savings expected to be implemented following an acquisition may be difficult to achieve. Acquisitions may also lead to a substantial increase in long-lived assets, including goodwill, which may later be subject to write-down if an acquired business does not perform as expected, which may have a material adverse effect on Philips’ earnings.

Philips may be unable to secure and maintain intellectual property rights for its products and services, or may use intellectual property rights unauthorized, which could have a material adverse effect on its results.

Philips is dependent on its ability to obtain and maintain licenses and other intellectual property (IP) rights covering its products and services and its design and manufacturing processes. The IP portfolio is the result of an extensive patenting process that could be influenced by a number of factors, including innovation. The value of the IP portfolio is dependent on the successful promotion and market acceptance of standards developed or co-developed by Philips. This is particularly applicable to the segment Other, where licenses from Philips to third parties generate IP royalties and are important to Philips’ results of operations. The timing of licenses from Philips to third parties and associated revenues from IP royalties are uncertain and may vary significantly from period to period. A loss or impairment in connection with such licenses to third parties could have a material adverse impact on Philips’ financial condition and operating results. Philips is also exposed to the risk that a third party may claim to own the intellectual property rights to technology applied in Philips’ products and services. In the event that any such claims of infringement of these intellectual property rights are successful, Philips may be required to pay damages to such third parties, or may incur other costs or losses.

6.4Operational risks

Failure to comply with quality standards, product safety laws and good manufacturing practices may result in product liability claims against Philips and an adverse impact on Philips’ reputation and brand.

Philips operates in a highly regulated product safety and quality environment and is required to comply with the highest standards of quality in the manufacture of its medical devices and in the provision of related services. Philips’ brand image and reputation would be adversely impacted by non-compliance with various product safety laws, good manufacturing practices and data protection regulations. Philips is also exposed to the risk that its products, including components or materials procured from suppliers, may prove not to be compliant with safety laws, e.g. chemical safety regulations. Such non-compliance could result in a ban on the sale or use of these products. In addition, quality issues and/or liability claims related to products and services could affect Philips’ reputation and its relationships with key customers (both customers for end-products and customers that use Philips’ products and services in their business processes) and demand for Philips products. As a result, depending on the product and manufacturing site concerned and the severity of the quality issue, Philips may suffer financial losses through lost revenue and the cost of any required remedial actions or damages claims, and such quality issues could have further impact on Philips’ reputation, market share and brand.

A breach in the security of, or a significant disruption to, our information technology systems or could adversely affect our operating results, financial condition, reputation and brand.

Philips relies on information technology to operate and manage its businesses and store confidential data (relating to employees, customers, intellectual property, suppliers and other partners). In addition, the integration of new acquisitions and the successful outsourcing of business processes are highly dependent on secure and well-controlled IT systems. Philips’ products, solutions and services increasingly contain sophisticated and complex information technology and generate confidential data related to customers and patients. Potential geopolitical conflicts and criminal activity continue to drive increases in the number and severity of cyber-attacks in general. Like many other multinational companies, Philips is therefore inherently and increasingly exposed to the risk of cyber-attacks. Information systems may be damaged, disrupted (including the provision of services to customers) or shut down due to (cyber) attacks by hackers, computer viruses or other malware. In addition, breaches in the security of our systems (or the systems of our customers, suppliers or other business partners) could result in the misappropriation, destruction or unauthorized disclosure of confidential information (including intellectual property) or personal data belonging to us or to our employees, partners, customers or suppliers. The aforementioned risks are particularly significant with respect to patient medical records. Successful cyber-attacks may result in substantial costs and other negative consequences, which may include, but are not limited to, lost revenues, reputational damage, remediation costs, and other liabilities to regulators, customers and partners and may involve incurrence of civil and/or criminal penalties. Furthermore, enhanced protection measures can involve significant costs. While cyber-attacks have not historically resulted in significant damage, or caused Philips to incur significant monetary cost in taking corrective action, there can be no assurance that future cyber-attack incidents will not result in significant damage to Philips systems, or result in financial losses, penalties or the other consequences described above.

Philips is exposed to risks in connection with IT system changes or failures.

Philips continuously seeks to create a more open, standardized and cost-effective IT landscape, for instance through further outsourcing, offshoring, commoditization and ongoing reduction in the number of IT systems. These changes create third-party risk with regard to the delivery of IT services, the availability of IT systems, and the scope and nature of the functionality offered by IT systems. Although Philips has sought to strengthen security measures and quality controls relating to these systems, these measures may prove to be insufficient or unsuccessful.

If Philips is unable to ensure effective supply chain management we may be faced for example interruptions or rising raw material prices, which could negatively impact our competitiveness in markets.

Philips is continuing the process of creating a leaner supply base with fewer suppliers, while maintaining dual/multiple sourcing strategies where feasible. This strategy requires close cooperation with suppliers to enhance, among other things, time to market and quality. In addition, Philips is continuing its initiatives to replace internal capabilities with less costly outsourced products and services. These processes may result in increased dependency on external suppliers and providers. Although Philips works closely with its suppliers to avoid supply-related problems, there can be no assurance that it will not encounter supply problems in the future or that it will be able to replace a supplier that is not able to meet demand sufficiently quickly to avoid disruptions.

Shortages or delays could materially harm Philips’ business. Most of Philips’ activities are conducted outside of the Netherlands, and international operations bring challenges. For example, Philips depends partly on the production and procurement of products and parts from Asian countries, this dependence constitutes a risk that production and shipping of products and parts could be interrupted by regional conflicts, health events such as coronavirus (COVID-19), a natural disaster or extreme weather events resulting from climate change. A general shortage of materials, components or subcomponents as a result of conflicts, health events, natural disasters or weather events or other unanticipated events also pose the risk of fluctuations in prices and demand, which could have a material adverse effect on Philips’ financial condition and operating results.

Philips purchases raw materials, including so-called rare earth metals, copper, steel, aluminum, noble gases and oil-related products, which exposes it to fluctuations in energy and raw material prices. In recent times, commodities have been subject to volatile markets, and such volatility is expected to continue. If Philips is not able to compensate for increased costs of raw materials, reduce reliance on such raw materials or pass on increased costs to customers, then price increases could have a material adverse impact on Philips’ results. In contrast, in times of falling commodity prices, Philips may not fully benefit from such price decreases, since Philips attempts to reduce the risk of rising commodity prices by several means, including long-term contracting or physical and financial hedging.

Failure to drive operational excellence, productivity and speed in Philips’ process to create and bring product and solution innovations to market could hamper Philips’ profitable growth ambitions.

To realize Philips’ ambitions for profitable growth, it is important that the company makes further improvements in its product and solution creation process, ensuring timely delivery of new products and solutions at lower cost, and in customer service levels, to gain sustainable competitive advantage. The emergence of new low-cost competitors, particularly in Asia, further underlines the importance of improvements in the product creation process. The success of new product and solution creation, however, depends on a number of factors, including timely and successful completion of development efforts, market acceptance, Philips’ ability to manage the risks associated with new products and production ramp-up issues, the ability of Philips to attract and retain employees with the appropriate skills, the availability of products in the right quantities and at appropriate costs to meet anticipated demand, and the risk that new products and services may have quality or other defects in the early stages of introduction. Costs of developing new products and solutions may be reflected on Philips’ balance sheet and may be subject to write-down or impairment as a result of the performance of such products or services, and the significance and timing of such write-downs or impairments are uncertain. Accordingly, Philips cannot determine in advance the ultimate effect that new product and solutions creations will have on its financial condition and operating results. If Philips fails to create and commercialize products, or fails to ensure that end-user insights are translated into solution and product creations that improve product mix and consequently contribution, it may lose market share and competitiveness, which could have a material adverse effect on its financial condition and operating results.

Because Philips is dependent on its people for leadership and specialized skills, a loss of its ability to attract and retain such personnel would have an adverse effect on its business.

The attraction and retention of talented employees in sales and marketing, research and development, finance, and general management, as well as highly specialized technical personnel, especially in transferring technologies to low-cost countries, is critical to Philips’ success. The loss of employees with specialized skills could also result in business interruptions. There can be no assurance that Philips will be successful in attracting and retaining highly qualified employees and the key personnel needed in the future.

Brexit could have an adverse effect on the company's operations

Philips sells products and services and currently has manufacturing operations in the United Kingdom. Depending on the outcome of Brexit (including future trade arrangements between the UK and the EU or other countries) and the transitional period following Brexit, which are currently uncertain, the potential financial impact ranges from adverse movements of the pound sterling versus the euro and the US dollar to supply chain disruptions due to the re-introduction of customs controls and the imposition of new tariffs on imports or exports to and from the United Kingdom. Philips has been preparing and planning for the impact of Brexit and future trade arrangements, however unsuccessful negotiations or unexpected outcomes with respect to the transitional period or future trade arrangements may have a material adverse effect on Philips' financial condition and operating results.

6.5Compliance risks

Philips is exposed to non-compliance with the various regulatory regimes their products and services are subject to, including data privacy requirements.

Philips’ products and services are subject to regulation (e.g. EU Medical Devices Regulation) by various government and regulatory agencies (e.g. FDA (US), NMPA (China), MHRA (UK), ASNM (France), BfArM (Germany), IGZ (Netherlands)) that may have different regulatory requirements and related processes. Obtaining regulatory approvals is costly and time-consuming, but is required for introducing products in the market. Philips’ increased focus on the healthcare sector increases its exposure to such highly regulated markets, where obtaining clearances or approvals for new products is of great importance. A delay or inability to obtain the necessary regulatory approvals for new products could have a material adverse effect on Philips’ business. In addition, conditions imposed by regulatory authorities could result in product recalls or a temporary ban on products and/or stoppages at production facilities, or increased implementation costs in the roll-out of products and services or claims for damages. The risk also exists that product safety incidents or user concerns, as in the past, could trigger business reviews by the FDA or other regulatory agencies: if failed, these reviews could lead to business interruption, which in turn could adversely affect Philips’ financial condition and operating results, as well as our reputation and brand. In light of Philips’ digital strategy, including its holding of personal health data and medical data, compliance with data privacy and similar laws is increasingly important to Philips’ business and operations. Non-compliance with any applicable laws and regulations, including with respect to product regulation and data privacy, may result in penalties, cost of proceedings and litigation, and repair costs, any of which may have a material adverse effect on Philips' financial condition and results of operations.

Philips is exposed to governmental investigations and legal proceedings with regard to possible anti-competitive market practices and other matters.

Philips, including a certain number of its current and former group companies, is involved in legal proceedings relating to such matters as competition issues, commercial transactions, product liability, participations and environmental pollution. In particular, European and various national authorities are focused on possible anti-competitive market practices. Philips’ financial position and results could be materially affected by an adverse final outcome of governmental investigations and litigation, as well as any potential related claims. In the past, Philips has been subject to such investigations, litigation and related claims. Since the ultimate outcome of asserted claims and proceedings, or the impact of any claims that may be asserted in the future, cannot be predicted with certainty, Philips’ financial position and results of operations could be affected materially by adverse outcomes.

Philips is exposed to non-compliance with business conduct rules and regulations.

Philips’ attempts to realize its growth ambitions could expose it to the risk of non-compliance with business conduct rules and regulations, such as anti-bribery provisions. This risk is heightened in growth geographies as the legal and regulatory environment is less developed in growth geographies compared to mature geographies. Examples include commission payments to third parties, remuneration payments to agents, distributors, consultants and the like, and the acceptance of gifts, which may be considered in some markets to be normal local business practice. These risks could adversely affect Philips’ financial condition and our reputation and brand.

6.6Financial risks

Philips is exposed to a variety of treasury risks and other financial risks including liquidity risk, currency risk, interest rate risk, commodity price risk, credit risk, country risk and other insurable risk.

Negative developments impacting the liquidity of global capital markets could affect the ability of Philips to raise or re-finance debt in the capital markets, or could lead to significant increases in the cost of such borrowing in the future. If the markets expect a downgrade by the rating agencies, or if such a downgrade has actually taken place, this could increase the cost of borrowing, reduce our potential investor base and adversely affect our business.

Philips operates in over 100 countries and its reported earnings and equity are therefore inevitably exposed to fluctuations in exchange rates of foreign currencies against the euro. Philips’ sales are sensitive in particular to movements in the US dollar, Japanese yen, Chinese yuan and a wide range of other currencies from developed and emerging economies. Philips’ sourcing and manufacturing spend is concentrated in the European Union, the United States and China. Income from operations is particularly sensitive to movements in currencies of countries where the Group has no or very small-scale manufacturing/local sourcing activities but significant sales of its products or services, such as Japan, Canada, Australia and the United Kingdom and in a range of emerging markets such as Russia, South Korea, Indonesia, India and Brazil.

In view of the long lifecycle of healthcare technology solution sales and partnerships, the financial risk of counterparties with outstanding payment obligations creates exposure risks for Philips, particularly in relation to accounts receivable with customers and liquid assets and fair values of derivatives and insurance receivables contracts with financial counterparties. A default by counterparties in such transactions can have a material adverse effect on Philips’ financial condition and operating results.

Philips is exposed to interest rate risk, particularly in relation to its long-term debt position; this risk can take the form of either fair value or cash flow risk. Failure to effectively hedge this risk can impact Philips’ financial condition and operating results.

Philips is exposed to tax risks which could have a significant adverse financial impact.

Philips is exposed to tax risks which could result in double taxation, penalties and interest payments. The source of the risks could originate from local tax rules and regulations as well as international and EU regulatory frameworks. These include transfer pricing risks on internal cross-border deliveries of goods and services, tax risks related to acquisitions and divestments, tax risks related to permanent establishments, tax risks relating to tax loss, interest and tax credits carried forward and potential changes in tax law that could result in higher tax expenses and payments. The risks may have a significant impact on local financial tax results, which, in turn, could adversely affect Philips’ financial condition and operating results.

The value of the deferred tax assets, such as tax losses carried forward, is subject to the availability of sufficient taxable income within the tax loss-carry-forward period, but also to the availability of sufficient taxable income within the foreseeable future in the case of tax losses carried forward with an indefinite carry-forward period. The ultimate realization of the company’s deferred tax assets, including tax losses and tax credits carried forward, depends on the generation of future taxable income in the countries where the temporary differences, unused tax losses and unused tax credits were incurred, and on periods during which the deferred tax assets become deductible. Additionally, in certain instances, realization of such deferred tax assets depends on the successful execution of tax planning strategies. Accordingly, there can be no absolute assurance that all deferred tax assets, such as (net) tax losses and credits carried forward, will be realized.

Philips has defined-benefit pension plans and other post-retirement plans in a number of countries. The funded status and maintenance cost are influenced by movements in financial markets and demographic developments, which may result in volatility in Philips’ financials.

A significant proportion of (former) employees in Europe and North and Latin America are covered by defined-benefit pension plans and other post-retirement plans. The accounting for such plans requires management to make estimates on assumptions such as discount rates, inflation, longevity, expected cost of medical care and expected rates of compensation. Changes in these assumptions (e.g. due to movements in financial markets) can have a significant impact on the Defined Benefit Obligation and net interest cost.

Flaws in internal controls would adversely affect our financial reporting and management process.

Accurate disclosures provide investors and other market professionals with significant information for a better understanding of Philips’ businesses. Failures in internal controls or other issues with respect to Philips’ public disclosures, including disclosures with respect to cybersecurity risks and incidents, could create market uncertainty regarding the reliability of the data (including financial data) presented and could have a negative impact on the price of Philips securities. In addition, the reliability of revenue and expenditure data is key for steering the businesses and for managing top-line and bottom-line growth. The long lifecycle of healthcare technology solution sales, from order acceptance to accepted installation and servicing, together with the complexity of the accounting rules for when revenue can be recognized in the accounts, presents a challenge in terms of ensuring consistent and correct application of the accounting rules throughout Philips’ global business. Any flaws in internal controls, or regulatory or investor actions in connection with flaws in internal controls, could adversely affect Philips’ financial condition, results of operation, reputation and brand.

7Supervisory Board

Jeroen van der Veer2)3)
Born 1947, Dutch
Chairman
Chairman of the Corporate Governance and Nomination & Selection Committee
Member of the Supervisory Board since 2009; third term expires in 2021
Former Chief Executive and Non-executive Director of Royal Dutch Shell and currently Chairman of the Supervisory Board of Royal Boskalis Westminster N.V. Vice-Chairman of the Supervisory Board of Equinor ASA. Chairman of the Supervisory Council of Delft University of Technology. Chairman of Het Concertgebouw Fonds (foundation). Also a senior advisor at Mazarine Energy B.V.
Neelam Dhawan1)
Born 1959, Indian
Member of the Supervisory Board since 2012; second term expires in 2020
Head India Advisory Board, IBM. Non-Executive Board Member of ICICI Bank Limited and Yatra Online Inc. Former Vice President, Global Sales and Alliance - Asia Pacific & Japan, Hewlett Packard Enterprise.
Liz Doherty1)
Born 1957, British/Irish
Member of the Supervisory Board since 2019; first term expires in 2023
Former CFO and board member of Reckitt Benckiser Group PLC, former CFO of Brambles Ltd, former non-executive director and audit committee member at Delhaize Group, Nokia Corp., SABMiller PLC and Dunelm Group PLC. Currently, member of the Supervisory Board and Chairwoman of the audit committee of Novartis AG, member of the Supervisory Board of Corbion N.V. Fellow of the Chartered Institute of Management Accountants. Former non-executive board member of the UK Ministry of Justice and of Her Majesty’s Courts and Tribunals Service (UK). Currently advisor to GBfoods and Affinity Petcare SA, subsidiairies of Agrolimen SA.
Orit Gadiesh2)
Born 1951, Israeli/American
Member of the Supervisory Board since 2014; second term expires in 2022
Currently Chairman of Bain & Company and member of the Foundation Board of the World Economic Forum (WEF) and member of the United States Council of Foreign Relations.
Marc Harrison4)
Born 1964, American
Member of the Supervisory Board since 2018; first term expires in 2022
Currently President and Chief Executive Officer of Intermountain Healthcare. Former Chief of International Business Development for Cleveland Clinic and Chief Executive Officer of Cleveland Clinic Abu Dhabi.
Christine Poon2)3)4)
Born 1952, American
Vice-Chairwoman and Secretary
Chairwoman of the Remuneration Committee
Member of the Supervisory Board since 2009; third term expires in 2021
Former Vice-Chairwoman of Johnson & Johnson’s Board of Directors and Worldwide Chairwoman of the Pharmaceuticals Group. Former dean of Ohio State University’s Fisher College of Business. Currently member of the Boards of Directors of Prudential, Regeneron and Sherwin Williams.
David Pyott1)4)
Born 1953, British/American
Chairman of the Audit Committee and the Quality & Regulatory Committee
Member of the Supervisory Board since 2015; second term expires in 2023
Former Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Allergan, Inc. Currently Lead Director of Avery Dennison Corporation. Member of the Board of Directors of Alnylam Pharmaceuticals Inc. and BioMarin Pharmaceutical Inc. Chairman of privately held Bioniz Therapeutics. Deputy Chairman of the Governing Board of London Business School, member of the Board of Trustees of California Institute of Technology, President of the International Council of Ophthalmology Foundation and member of the Advisory Board of the Foundation of the American Academy of Ophthalmology.
Paul Stoffels
Born 1962, Belgian
Member of the Supervisory Board since 2018; first term expires in 2022
Currently Vice Chair of the Executive Committee and Chief Scientific Officer at Johnson & Johnson. Previously, Worldwide Chair of Pharmaceuticals at Johnson & Johnson, CEO of Virco and Chairman of Tibotec.
1)member of the Audit Committee2)member of the Remuneration Committee3)member of the Corporate Governance and Nomination & Selection Committee4)member of the Quality & Regulatory Committee
For a current overview of the Supervisory Board members, see also https://www.philips.com/a-w/about/company/our-management/supervisory-board.html

8Supervisory Board report

Letter from the Chairman of the Supervisory Board


Dear Stakeholder,

Philips continued to make significant progress on many fronts in 2019, despite sustained global geo-political and economic uncertainty. The company enjoyed good growth, while tariff headwinds and transformation investments weighed upon the financial return. Philips’ strategy to become the leading provider of health technology solutions and advance value-based care along the health continuum is resonating strongly with customers and investors. The company’s innovations – supporting personal health, precision diagnosis, image-guided therapies and connected care across various care settings, and leveraging the power of data and informatics – have strong market positions. At the same time, Philips’ strong focus on customer needs is translating into an increasing proportion of solutions-based sales, e.g. from the growing number of long-term strategic partnerships.

As a purpose-driven company, Philips has aligned its goals with the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDG), specifically SDG 3 (Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages), 12 (Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns) and 13 (Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts). Philips continues to work towards its ambitious sustainability targets, supporting improved access to care for underserved communities, driving the transition to a circular economy-based business approach, and taking further steps towards carbon neutrality in its operations by 2020.

In terms of financial performance, Philips was able to deliver on its medium-term top-line target of 4-6% comparable sales growth*). Although profitability improved, it was less than the 100 basis points on average for each of the past three years. Capital allocation remains balanced across dividends, share buybacks, organic Research & Development (R&D) investments, and Mergers & Acquisitions (M&A) transactions

The Supervisory Board spent several sessions in 2019 reviewing, among other things, Philips’ performance, strategy, talent pipeline, business controls, quality, and sustainability programs.

At the AGM in May, CEO Frans van Houten and CFO Abhijit Bhattacharya were re-appointed for another 4-year term, ensuring continuity of the successful transformation Philips is going through.

At the same meeting, the Supervisory Board was strengthened by the addition of Liz Doherty, a senior finance executive with 30 years of international experience in large multinational organizations, including international consumer and retail businesses. In view of Philips’ transformation into a customer-centric solutions company focused on health technology across the personal health and professional healthcare domains, I am confident Liz will make a significant contribution to the work of our Board.

I would like to take this opportunity to thank Jackson Tai and Heino von Prondzynski, who stepped down from the Board in 2019, for their contribution to our work over a period of many years. Along with my colleagues on the Supervisory Board, we look forward to providing continued oversight of Philips as it progresses on its journey as a leader in health technology, improving the lives of billions of consumers, patients and healthcare professionals around the world.

Jeroen van der Veer
Chairman of the Supervisory Board

Introduction Supervisory Board Report

The Supervisory Board supervises and advises the Board of Management and Executive Committee in performing their management tasks and setting the direction of the business of the Philips Group. The Supervisory Board acts, and we as individual members of the Board act, in the interests of Koninklijke Philips N.V., its businesses and all its stakeholders. This report includes a more specific description of the Supervisory Board’s activities during the financial year 2019 and other relevant information on its functioning.

Activities of the Supervisory Board

The overview below indicates a number of matters that we reviewed and/or discussed during meetings throughout 2019:

  • An annual assessment of the company’s overall strategy to extend its leadership as a health technology company. This includes reviews of the strategic priorities for each of the business clusters, Research & Development and the Philips Business System (the company’s standard operating model) as well as a review of the data strategy. Optional strategic scenarios for both businesses and markets were evaluated and the possible ambitions of the company’s competitors in healthcare were reviewed. Furthermore, the company’s acquisitions, divestments and partnerships funnel were assessed on a regular basis;
  • The performance of the Philips group, its underlying businesses and the company’s flexibility under its capital structure and credit ratings to pay dividends and to fund capital investments, including share repurchases and other financial initiatives;
  • Philips’ annual management commitment including the 2020 key performance indicators for the Executive Committee and the annual operating plan for 2020;
  • Quality and regulatory compliance, systems and processes. The Supervisory Board also reviewed the requirements of the European Union Medical Device Regulation and the plan to meet these requirements. Also refer to the description of the activities of the Quality & Regulatory Committee in the section Report of the Quality & Regulatory Committee of this Supervisory Board report;
  • Capital allocation, including the dividend policy, the progress made with the share buyback program announced on January 29, 2019, the progress made with the sell-down of the remaining stake in Signify (formerly Philips Lighting) which was completed in September 2019 and the M&A framework;
  • Acquisitions and divestments, including amongst others the acquisition of the Healthcare Information Systems business of Carestream Health.
  • The transformation of Philips’ supply chain and operations and the progress made therein;
  • The progress made on the set up of Global Business Services hubs that enable the centralized execution of business processes;
  • Enterprise risk management, which included an update on the enterprise risk management processes, the outcome of the annual risk assessment dialogue with the Executive Committee and discussion of the key risks faced by Philips, the control and mitigation measures and the possible impact of such risks. Risk domains covered included strategy, operations, finance and compliance;
  • Group security, including cyber-, product- and physical & people security;
  • Talent management and review, the progress made on the people strategy since 2017, inclusion and diversity, culture and succession planning for senior management;
  • Evaluation of the Board of Management and the Executive Committee based on the achievement of specific group and individual targets approved by the Supervisory Board at the beginning of the year;
  • Oversight of adequacy of financial and internal controls;
  • Significant civil litigation claims against and public investigations into Philips;
  • Philips’ sustainability program, focusing on United Nations Sustainable Development Goals 3 (Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages), 12 (Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns), 13 (Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts) and 17 (Revitalize the global partnership for sustainable development).

The Supervisory Board also conducted “deep dives” on a range of topics including:

  • Strategic roadmaps and education sessions on Diagnosis & Treatment, Connected Care and Personal Health;
  • The strategy and performance of Philips North America and International Markets including market developments, business performance and key strategic initiatives.

The Supervisory Board also reviewed Philips’ annual and interim financial statements, including non- financial information, prior to publication.

Supervisory Board meetings and attendance

In 2019, the members of the Supervisory Board convened for seven regular meetings. Moreover, we collectively and individually interacted with members of the Executive Committee and with senior management outside the formal Supervisory Board meetings. The Chairman of the Supervisory Board and the CEO met regularly for bilateral discussions about the company’s progress on a variety of matters. Members of the Supervisory Board also held bilateral meetings with members of the Executive Committee to discuss various topics such as operational performance and trade tariffs headwinds. Liz Doherty, appointed to the Supervisory Board with effect from August 1, 2019, followed an induction program and interacted with various Executive Committee members for deep-dives on strategy, finance and investor relations, governance and legal affairs.

The Supervisory Board meetings were well attended in 2019. All Supervisory Board members were present during the Supervisory Board meetings in 2019, with the exception of one member not able to attend the October meeting and one member not able to attend the December meeting. The Supervisory Board visited the company’s Global Business Services hub in Nashville, Tennessee, USA, and reviewed the strategy and performance of Philips North America. The Supervisory Board also visited the company’s Innovation Center in Best, the Netherlands, and toured the Customer Experience Center. The tour included demonstrations of the latest innovations in the area of diagnostics, clinical applications and image guided therapy. The committees of the Supervisory Board also convened regularly (see the separate reports of the committees below) and all of the committees reported back on their activities to the full Supervisory Board. In addition to the formal meetings of the Board and its committees, the Board members held private meetings. We, as members of the Board, devoted sufficient time to engage (proactively if the circumstances so required) in our supervisory responsibilities.

Composition, diversity and self-evaluation by the Supervisory Board

The Supervisory Board is a separate corporate body that is independent of the Board of Management and the company. Its independent character is also reflected in the requirement that members of the Supervisory Board can be neither a member of the Board of Management nor an employee of the company. The Supervisory Board considers all its members to be independent under the Dutch Corporate Governance Code. Furthermore, the members of its Audit Committee are independent under the applicable US rules.

The Supervisory Board currently consists of eight members. In 2019, there were a number of changes to the composition of the Board. Jackson Tai stepped down from the Supervisory Board on March 31, 2019, after serving two consecutive terms on the Board. The term of appointment of Heino von Prondzynski expired at the end of the 2019 Annual General Meeting of Shareholders, after three consecutive terms on the Board. At the 2019 Annual General Meeting of Shareholders, David Pyott was re-appointed as a member of the Supervisory Board for an additional term of four years and Liz Doherty was appointed (with effect from August 1, 2019) as a member of the Supervisory Board. The agenda for the upcoming 2020 Annual General Meeting of Shareholders will include a proposal to re-appoint Neelam Dhawan as member of the Supervisory Board. Taking into account the desired profile of the Supervisory Board, including its diversity policy and the desired competencies and experiences, the Supervisory Board has decided to propose the re-appointment of Ms Dhawan for an additional period of two years on the basis of Ms Dhawan’s in-depth knowledge of the IT industry, including software engineering, research and IT and her overall qualities as a Supervisory Board member, as demonstrated during her past period as member of the Supervisory Board. The agenda will also include proposals to appoint Feike Sijbesma and Peter Löscher as new members of the Supervisory Board. Feike Sijbesma is a recognized business and sustainability leader, while Peter Löscher is a seasoned business leader in the medical technology and pharmaceutical industries. Their outstanding experience will be highly valuable to Philips, as the company is expanding its leadership in health technology solutions, on a mission to make the world healthier and more sustainable through innovation.

The Supervisory Board attaches great value to diversity in its composition and adopted a Diversity Policy for the Supervisory Board, Board of Management and Executive Committee (see the Corporate Governance and Nomination and Selection Committee report for further details). As laid down in the Diversity Policy, the aim is that the Supervisory Board, Board of Management and Executive Committee comprise members with a European and a non-European background (nationality, working experience or otherwise) and overall at least four different nationalities, and that they comprise at least 30% male and at least 30% female members. The Supervisory Board’s composition furthermore follows the profile included in the Rules of Procedure of the Supervisory Board, which aims for an appropriate combination of knowledge and experience among its members, encompassing marketing, manufacturing, technology, healthcare, financial, economic, social and legal aspects of international business and government and public administration in relation to the global and multiproduct character of Philips’ businesses. The aim is also to have one or more members with an executive or similar position in business or society no longer than five years ago. The composition of the Supervisory Board shall be in accordance with the best practice provisions on independence of the Dutch Corporate Governance Code, and each member of the Supervisory Board shall be capable of assessing the broad outline of the overall policy of the company. The size of the Supervisory Board may vary as it considers appropriate to support its profile.

Currently, 30% (6 out of 20) of the positions to which the Diversity Policy applies (Supervisory Board and Executive Committee/Board of Management) is held by women. We note that there may be various pragmatic reasons – such as other relevant selection criteria and the availability of suitable candidates – that could play a role in the achievement of our diversity goals.

The Supervisory Board spent time throughout 2019 considering its composition, and it will continue to devote attention to this topic during 2020.

In 2019, each member of the Supervisory Board completed a questionnaire to verify compliance with the applicable corporate governance rules and its own Rules of Procedure. The outcome of this survey was satisfactory.

An independent external party facilitated the 2019 self-evaluation process for the Supervisory Board and its committees by drafting the relevant questionnaires as well as reporting on the results. The questionnaire covered topics such as the composition of the Supervisory Board and the required profile of future Supervisory Board members, stakeholder oversight, dynamics and focus of Supervisory Board meetings and the relationship between the Supervisory Board and Management, access to information, the frequency and quality of the meetings, quality and timeliness of the meeting materials, the nature of the topics discussed during meetings and the priority topics for the Supervisory Board in the coming year, strategic oversight, succession planning and the performance of the Supervisory Board’s committees. The responses to the questionnaire were aggregated into a report, after which bilateral meetings were held in early 2020 between the Chairman of the Supervisory Board and each member.

The results of the self-evaluation were shared and discussed in private meetings of the Supervisory Board. The responses provided by the Supervisory Board members indicated that the Board continues to be a well-functioning team. A number of suggestions were made to improve the performance of the Supervisory Board over the coming period, with the top priorities being: an increased focus on talent and succession plans at Executive Committee level, oversight of both organic and inorganic growth of the company and its portfolio, value creation, quality and compliance and technology (including IT and cyber security) developments that are relevant for the company. The functioning of the Supervisory Board committees was rated highly. The Vice-Chairwoman also evaluated the Chairman of the Supervisory Board on a separate questionnaire. The periodic use of an external facilitator to measure the functioning of the Supervisory Board will continue to be considered in the future.

Supervisory Board composition

Jeroen van der Veer

Neelam Dhawan

Orit Gadiesh

Christine Poon

David Pyott

Paul Stoffels

Marc Harrison

Liz Doherty1)

Year of birth

1947

1959

1951

1952

1953

1962

1964

1957

Gender

Male

Female

Female

Female

Male

Male

Male

Female

Nationality

Dutch

Indian

Israeli/American

American

British/American

Belgian

American

British/Irish

Initial appointment date

2009

2012

2014

2009

2015

2018

2018

2019

Date of (last) (re-)appointment

2017

2016

2018

2017

2019

n/a

n/a

n/a

End of current term

2021

2020

2022

2021

2023

2022

2022

2023

Independent

yes

yes

yes

yes

yes

yes

yes

yes

Committee memberships2)

RC & CGNSC

AC

RC

RC, CGNSC & QRC

AC & QRC

n/a

QRC

AC

Attendance at Supervisory Board meetings

(7/7)

(7/7)

(7/7)

(7/7)

(6/7)

(7/7)

(6/7)

(3/3)

Attendance at Committee meetings

RC (7/7)

CGNSC (5/5)

AC (5/5)

AC (4/5)3)

RC (5/5)3)

RC (7/7)

CGNSC (5/5)

QRC (8/8)

AC (5/5)

QRC (6/8)

n/a

QRC (2/4)4)

n/a5)

International business

yes

yes

yes

yes

yes

yes

yes

yes

Marketing

yes

yes

yes

yes

yes

Manufacturing

yes

yes

yes

yes

Technology & informatics

yes

yes

yes

yes

yes

yes

Healthcare

yes

yes

yes

yes

Finance

yes

yes

yes

yes

yes

yes

Supervisory Board committees

The Supervisory Board has assigned certain of its tasks to the three long-standing committees, also referred to in the Dutch Corporate Governance Code: the Corporate Governance and Nomination & Selection Committee, the Remuneration Committee and the Audit Committee. The Supervisory Board also established the Quality & Regulatory Committee. The separate reports of these committees are part of this Supervisory Board report and are published below.

The function of all of the Board’s committees is to prepare the decision-making of the full Supervisory Board, and the committees currently have no independent or assigned powers. The full Board retains overall responsibility for the activities of its committees.

Financial Statements 2019

The financial statements of the company for 2019, as presented by the Board of Management, have been audited by Ernst & Young Accountants LLP, the independent external auditor appointed by the General Meeting of Shareholders. We have approved these financial statements, and all individual members of the Supervisory Board have signed these documents (as did the members of the Board of Management).

We recommend to shareholders that they adopt the 2019 financial statements. We likewise recommend to shareholders that they adopt the proposal of the Board of Management to make a distribution of EUR 0.85 per common share, in cash or in shares at the option of the shareholder (up to EUR 761 million if all shareholders would elect cash), against the net income for 2019.

Finally, we would like to express our thanks to the members of the Board of Management, the Executive Committee and all other employees for their continued contribution during the year.

February 25, 2020

The Supervisory Board

Jeroen van der Veer
Christine Poon
Neelam Dhawan
Liz Doherty
Orit Gadiesh
Marc Harrison
David Pyott
Paul Stoffels

Further information

To gain a better understanding of the responsibilities of the Supervisory Board and the internal regulations and procedures governing its functioning and that of its committees, please refer to Corporate governance and to the following documents published on the company’s website:

  • Articles of Association
  • Rules of Procedure Supervisory Board, including the Charters of the Board committees
  • Diversity Policy for the Supervisory Board, Board of Management and Executive Committee
Changes and (re-)appointments Supervisory Board and committees 2019
  • Jackson Tai and Heino von Prondzynski are no longer members of the Supervisory Board.
  • David Pyott was re-appointed as a member of the Supervisory Board.
  • Liz Doherty was appointed as a member of the Supervisory Board.
Proposed (re-)appointments Supervisory Board 2020
  • It is proposed to re-appoint Neelam Dhawan as member of the Supervisory Board.
  • It is proposed to appoint Feike Sijbesma and Peter Löscher as members of the Supervisory Board.
*)Non-IFRS financial measure. For the definition and reconciliation of the most directly comparable IFRS measure, refer to Reconciliation of non-IFRS information.

8.1Report of the Corporate Governance and Nomination & Selection Committee

The Corporate Governance and Nomination & Selection Committee is chaired by Jeroen van der Veer and its other member is Christine Poon. The Committee is responsible for the review of selection criteria and appointment procedures for the Board of Management, the Executive Committee, certain other key management positions, as well as the Supervisory Board.

In 2019, the Committee met five times.

The Committee devoted time to the appointment or reappointment of candidates to fill current and future vacancies on the Supervisory Board, Board of Management and Executive Committee.

Following those consultations it prepared decisions and advised the Supervisory Board on candidates for appointment. This resulted in the re-appointment of David Pyott and the appointment (effective August 1, 2019) of Liz Doherty as members of the Supervisory Board. This also resulted in the proposal to re-appoint Neelam Dhawan and appoint Feike Sijbesma and Peter Löscher as member of the Supervisory Board, at the upcoming 2020 Annual General Meeting of Shareholders.

Under its responsibility for the selection criteria and appointment procedures for Philips’ senior management, the Committee reviewed the functioning of the Board of Management and its individual members, the Executive Committee succession plans and emergency candidates for key roles in the company. The conclusions from these reviews were taken into account in the performance evaluation of the Board of Management and Executive Committee members and the selection of succession candidatesa).

In 2019, the Committee devoted time to the appointment or reappointment of candidates to fill current and future vacancies on the Board of Management and the Executive Committee. This included the re-appointment of Frans van Houten as President/CEO and member of the Board of Management and Abhijit Bhattacharya as member of the Board of Management fulfilling the role of CFO, at the 2019 Annual General Meeting of Shareholders. Bert van Meurs was appointed as Chief Business Leader Image Guided Therapy effective January 2019. Daniela Seabrook was appointed as Chief Human Resources Officer in August 2019, succeeding Ronald de Jong (effective December 2019).

With respect to corporate governance matters, the Committee discussed relevant developments and legislative changes, including Dutch legislation implementing the EU Directive on Shareholder Rights.

Diversity

In 2017, the Supervisory Board adopted a Diversity Policy for the Supervisory Board, Board of Management and Executive Committee, which is published on the company website.

The criteria in the Diversity Policy aim to ensure that the Supervisory Board, Board of Management and Executive Committee have a sufficient diversity of views and the expertise needed for a good understanding of current affairs and longer-term risks and opportunities related to the company’s business. The nature and complexity of the company’s business is taken into account when assessing optimal board diversity, as well as the social and environmental context in which the company operates.

Pursuant to the Diversity Policy, the selection of candidates for appointment to the Supervisory Board, Board of Management and Executive Committee will be based on merit. With due regard to the above, the company shall seek to fill vacancies by considering candidates that bring a diversity of (amongst others) age, gender and educational and professional backgrounds.

The Supervisory Board’s aim is that the Supervisory Board, Board of Management and Executive Committee comprise members with a European and a non-European background (nationality, working experience or otherwise) and overall at least four different nationalities, and that they comprise at least 30% male and at least 30% female members.

Currently, the Supervisory Board and the Board of Management/Executive Committee comprise members with more than 10 different nationalities. The composition of the Board of Management and Executive Committee does not yet meet the above-mentioned gender diversity goals. Upon the proposed (re-)appointments at the upcoming 2020 Annual General Meeting of Shareholders, approximately 27% (6 out of 22) of the positions to which the Diversity Policy applies (Supervisory Board and Executive Committee/Board of Management) will be held by women. As indicated in the Supervisory Board report, there may be a variety of pragmatic reasons – such as other relevant selection criteria and the availability of suitable candidates – that may impact our achievement of our diversity goals. The company continues to put in place measures to enhance diversity and inclusion. With Diversity being one of the three strategic pillars of the global Human Resources strategy, long-term Inclusion & Diversity ambitions are embedded in that strategy. Execution is monitored monthly based on a global scorecard with specific goals, which ensures clarity, accountability and focus and makes it possible to customize goals where appropriate. During 2019, further work was done to bring the various initiatives together, to drive an ongoing dialogue on this topic within the company and create a more holistic approach to sustainably enhance diversity:

  • The company introduced an integrated approach to recruitment, promotion and retention activities. This has strengthened the overall talent pipeline and resulted in women holding 24% of the most senior-level positions in the company, a milestone for the company;
  • Employee surveys include questions about diversity and inclusion. Results from recent surveys show positive trends, with all employees across all grades becoming more positive about Philips’ commitment to diversity in its widest sense, including background, talent and perspective as well as gender;
  • Building and fostering an inclusive work environment in which diversity can thrive, the company began to develop and deploy tailor-made training designed to deal with unconscious bias. The training creates an awareness of, and an ongoing dialogue around, unconscious bias and its impact on inclusion. In 2019, more than 50% of the members of the Philips leadership teams received training, and this training will be continued in 2020;
  • A global mentoring framework was developed, supporting an environment of mutual learning and enabling employees to connect to different mentoring initiatives. The company also actively supported employees in setting up their own ‘bottom up’ networks. Multiple women’s leadership activities were organized in 2019 across various levels and networks. International Women’s Day was a highlight, being celebrated at more than 72 locations worldwide, and reaching over 15,000 employees. Philips also supported Pride celebrations worldwide;
  • Philips’ senior women-focused employer brand campaign continued in 2019;
  • For the first time ever, the company participated in the 2019 Human Rights Campaign Corporate Equality Index, a national benchmarking tool on corporate policies and practices pertinent to LGBTQ employee equality.

Philips’ commitment towards Inclusion and Diversity is furthermore reflected in the company-wide Inclusion and Diversity Policy, the General Business Principles and the Fair Employment Policy.

The Committee continues to give appropriate weight to diversity in the nomination and appointment process for future vacancies, while taking into account the overall profile and selection criteria for the appointment of suitable candidates to the Supervisory Board, Board of Management and Executive Committee.

a)Reference is made in 2019 Annual Incentive setting out the performance review of the Board of Management and the Executive Committee members by the Remuneration Committee.

8.2Report of the Remuneration Committee


8.2.1Letter from the Remuneration Committee Chair

Dear Stakeholder,

On behalf of the Remuneration Committee, I am pleased to report on the Committee’s activities in 2019 (and part of 2020), and to present the 2019 Remuneration Report in respect of the Board of Management and the Supervisory Board. As explained in more detail below, the Committee addressed a number of recurring topics during its regular annual cycle, and devoted time to two other important topics: the services agreements of Frans van Houten and Abhijit Bhattacharya (which were renewed upon their re-appointment in May 2019), and the actions to be taken following the implementation in Dutch law of the revised EU Shareholder Rights Directive.

Our remuneration structure aspires to support Philips’ stated mission, vision and strategy while motivating, retaining and attracting world-class talent. It aims to reinforce and support our key strategic drivers in both the short and long term - the achievement of which will support sustainable, long-term value creation for all stakeholders. Our Long-Term Incentives form a substantial part of total remuneration, with payouts contingent on achievement of challenging EPS targets and relative TSR performance against a high performing peer group. In designing and executing our policy, we engage with our stakeholders to ensure broad support. By requiring members of the Board of Management and senior management to maintain meaningful levels of share ownership we encourage them to act as stewards and ambassadors of the company.

We delivered a strong 4.5% comparable sales growth*), which is in line with our ambitious target setting. This was achieved in the face of, among others, challenging socio-economic circumstances in Europe, uncertainty in the US around healthcare policy, tariff wars between the US and China and emerging market weakness in some countries. Nevertheless, we delivered a Free cash flow*) of more than EUR 1 billion. Following three years of strong performance, 2019’s profitability performance was below our plan, in part due to external headwinds. Taken all together, the result on the key financial indicators as well as the achievement against individual targets, was below the targets as set for the Board of Management. As a direct consequence, the 2019 Annual Incentive payments are below target as well. For more information please refer to the section 2019 Annual Incentive.

The composition of the Remuneration Committee and its activities

The Remuneration Committee is chaired by Christine Poon (who succeeded Heino von Prondzynski in May 2019). Its other members are Jeroen van der Veer and (since May 2019) Orit Gadiesh. The Committee is responsible for preparing decisions of the Supervisory Board on the remuneration of individual members of the Board of Management and the Executive Committee, as well as the policies governing this remuneration. In performing its duties and responsibilities, the Remuneration Committee is assisted by an external consultant and an in-house remuneration expert acting on the basis of a protocol which ensures that they act on the instructions of the Remuneration Committee. Currently, no member of the Remuneration Committee is a member of the board of management of another listed company. For a full overview of the responsibilities of the Committee, please refer to the Charter of the Remuneration Committee as outlined in Chapter 3 of the Rules of Procedure of the Supervisory Board (which are published on the company’s website).

We have a robust annual Remuneration Committee cycle with a number of regular agenda topics, which enable us to have an effective decision-making process supporting the determination, review and implementation of the Remuneration Policy. The main (recurring) activities during the 2019-2020 cycle are outlined below:

July to September:

October to December:

January to March:

April to June:

  • Review the Remuneration Policy in line with the business strategy and priorities and assess the need for changes

  • Engage in stakeholder dialogues regarding the Remuneration Policy and proposed changes for the next year (if any)

  • Evaluate business perfor-mance and achievement of Annual and Long-Term Incentive targets

  • Effectuate compensation level changes

  • Review the Remuneration Committee Charter

  • Assess compensation levels against the median of the Quantum Peer Group for compensation benchmarking purposes

  • Rigorous target setting of the performance metrics for the upcoming year and multi-year LTI cycle

  • Prepare and hold the Annual General Meeting of Shareholders including a discussion on (the implementation of) the Remuneration Policy

  • Conduct scenario analyses

  • Set compensation levels for upcoming year

  • Prepare Remuneration Report for the previous year

The Committee met seven times in 2019. All Committee members were present during these meetings.

New services agreements of Frans van Houten and Abhijit Bhattacharya

During the 2019 Annual General Meeting of Shareholders, Frans van Houten was re-appointed as President/CEO and member of the Board of Management and Abhijit Bhattacharya was re-appointed as member of the Board of Management fulfilling the role of CFO. As part of their renewed service agreements, an increase in the annual base compensation of Messrs Van Houten and Bhattacharya was provided in line with the company’s Remuneration Policy, while their Pension Transition Allowances were maintained at the current level for the term of their services agreements.

When setting the terms of remuneration and considering remuneration levels, due consideration was given to the performance of the company under the leadership of Messrs Van Houten and Bhattacharya and to the importance of the continuation of their leadership for the transformation of Philips. As a result, the total remuneration of each of Messrs Van Houten and Bhattacharya was set closer to market levels. The new base salary of Mr Van Houten (EUR 1,325,000) implies a compound annual growth rate of 2.4% over the period 2011 – 2019, which is aligned with (and even below) the average increase in the broader executive and employee population in the Netherlands. Mr Bhattacharya’s base salary was below market levels which led to a correction to a now market aligned remuneration (EUR 785,000).

The Supervisory Board engaged with a number of its shareholders and with institutional advisory organizations to solicit their feedback on the terms of remuneration and its considerations. The terms were disclosed prior to, and discussed during, the 2019 Annual General Meeting of Shareholders.

Dutch law implementing the EU Shareholder Rights Directive

The revised EU Shareholders Rights Directive has been implemented in Dutch law, effective December 2019. The new statutory regime requires that the Remuneration Policy and the Long-Term Incentive Plan for the Board of Management be amended to align these with the newly introduced requirements. In addition, the new regime requires that a Remuneration Policy be adopted for the Supervisory Board. The Remuneration Committee feels that these enhanced requirements (and the resulting internal and external discussions) will positively contribute to aligning the interests of the company and its stakeholders.

The agenda for the upcoming 2020 Annual General Meeting of Shareholders will include the proposals needed to address these requirements and to propose certain other amendments. As will be reflected in the relevant proposals that will be published in due course, the Remuneration Committee has been engaging proactively with key stakeholders, including a number of the company’s major shareholders and institutional advisory organizations to solicit their feedback on, and support for the proposed policies.

The new statutory regime also introduces new requirements for the annual reporting on the remuneration of the Board of Management and the Supervisory Board. Please refer to the 2019 Remuneration Report for the Board of Management and the Supervisory Board, respectively, which are included below in section Remuneration report 2019 of our report. Also in accordance with newly introduced requirements, the agenda for the upcoming 2020 Annual General Meeting of Shareholders will include an advisory vote on the 2019 Remuneration Report for the Board of Management and the Supervisory Board.

Christine Poon
Chairwoman of the Remuneration Committee

*)Non-IFRS financial measure. For the definition and reconciliation of the most directly comparable IFRS measure, refer to Reconciliation of non-IFRS information.

8.2.2Remuneration report 2019

Introduction

In this Remuneration Report, the Supervisory Board provides a comprehensive overview, in accordance with article 2:135b of the Dutch Civil Code, of the remuneration paid and owed to the individual members of the Board of Management and the Supervisory Board, respectively, in the financial year 2019.

Board of Management

The Supervisory Board has determined the 2019 pay-outs and awards to the members of the Board of Management, upon the proposal of the Remuneration Committee, in accordance with the Remuneration Policy and the Long-Term Incentive Plan as separately adopted and approved, respectively, by our shareholders during the 2017 Annual General Meeting of Shareholders.

2017 Remuneration Policy and Long-Term Incentive Plan

The objectives of the Remuneration Policy for members of the Board of Management are in line with that for Philips Executives throughout the Philips group: to focus them on improving the performance of the company and enhancing the value of the Philips group, to motivate and retain them, and to be able to attract other highly qualified executives when required.

In determining the Remuneration Policy, the Supervisory Board ensures that a competitive remuneration package for Board-level executive talent is maintained and benchmarked. Total direct remuneration and each main component, such as base salary, Annual Incentive target and Long-Term Incentive target is aimed at or close to, the median of our Quantum Peer Group (see below). To establish this benchmark, data research is carried out each year on the peer companies’ remuneration practices.

The Remuneration Committee conducts a scenario analysis annually. This includes the calculation of remuneration under different scenarios, whereby different Philips performance assumptions and corporate actions are examined. The Supervisory Board concluded that the relationship between the strategic objectives and the chosen performance criteria for the 2019 Annual Incentive, as well as 2017 Long-Term Incentive performance criteria were adequate.

Quantum Peer Group versus TSR Performance Peer Group

We use a Quantum Peer Group for remuneration benchmarking purposes, and therefore we aim to ensure that it includes either business competitors, with an emphasis on companies in the healthcare, technology related or consumer products area and other companies we compete with for executive talent. The Quantum Peer Group consists of predominantly Dutch and other European companies, plus a minority number (up to 25%) of US based global companies, of comparable size, complexity and international scope.

Philips Group

Quantum Peer Group1)

2019

European companies

Atos

Reckitt Benckiser

BAE Systems

Roche

Capgemini

Rolls-Royce

Electrolux

Safran

Ericsson

Siemens Healthineers

Essity

Smith & Nephew

Fresenius Medical Care

Thales

Henkel & Co

Nokia

Dutch companies

US companies

Ahold Delhaize

Becton Dickinson

AkzoNobel

Boston Scientific

ASML

Danaher

Heineken

In addition, we use a TSR Performance Peer Group to benchmark our relative Total Shareholder Return performance for Long-Term Incentive purposes and against our business peers in the health technology market and other markets in which we compete. The companies we have selected for this peer group include predominantly US based healthcare companies.

Philips Group

TSR Performance Peer Group

2019

US companies

European companies

Japanese companies

Becton Dickinson

De Longhi

Hitachi

Boston Scientific

Elekta

Terumo

Cerner

Fresenius Medical Care

Danaher

Getinge

General Electric

Groupe SEV

Hologic

Siemens Healthineers

Johnson & Johnson

Smith & Nephew

Medtronic

Resmed

Stryker

The Remuneration Policy allows certain changes to these peer groups to be made by the Supervisory Board, for example for reasons of changes in business or competitive nature of the companies involved. Such change will be disclosed if it has a substantial impact on peer group composition. No changes were made to the peer groups during 2019.

Remuneration structure

In line with market practice, the remuneration structure for the members of the board of management includes the following remuneration elements: Annual Base Compensation, Annual Incentive, Long-Term Incentive and certain customary benefits and arrangements.

Total direct remuneration and each main component, being Annual Base Compensation, the on-target Annual Incentive and the on-target Long-Term Incentive is aimed at or close to, the median of the Quantum Peer Group. The positioning of total direct remuneration and its main components is reviewed against benchmark data on an annual basis and is recalibrated if and when required. To establish this benchmark, data research is carried out each year on the peer companies’ remuneration practices.

Definition

Policy level

Annual Base Compensation (“ABC”)

Fixed cash payments intended to attract and retain executive of the highest caliber and to reflect their experience and scope of responsibilities

Annual Base Compensation levels and any adjustments made by the Supervisory Board are based on factors including the median of Quantum Peer Group data and performance and experience of the individual member. The annual review date for the base salary is typically April 1.

Annual Incentive (“AI”)

Variable cash bonus incentive of which achievement is tied to specific financial and non-financial targets derived from the company’s annual strategic plan

President & CEO
On-target: 100%
Maximum: 200%
of Annual Base Compensation

Other BoM members
On-target: 80%
Maximum: 160%
of Annual Base Compensation

Long-Term Incentive (“LTI”)

Variable equity incentive of achievement is tied to targets reflecting long-term stakeholder value creation and delivered in the form of performance shares

President & CEO
Annual grant size: 200%
of Annual Base Compensation

Other BoM members
Annual grant size: 150%
of Annual Base Compensation

Pensions

Participation in the Philips Flex ES pension plan in the Netherlands (applicable for all executives) combined with a fixed pension contribution intended to result into an appropriate level at retirement

Additional benefits

Cash value (grossed up) of the benefits received, which are in line with other Philips executives in the Netherlands

Additional arrangements include expense and relocation allowances, medical insurance, accident insurance and company car arrangements.

Mix of remuneration elements

To support the Remuneration Policy’s objectives, the Policy includes a significant variable part in the form of an Annual Incentive (cash bonus) and Long-Term Incentive in the form of performance shares. As a result, a significant proportion of pay is ‘at risk’ through incentives. The chart below shows the relative on-target value of fixed versus variable compensation with 70-75% of compensation being variable.

Remuneration elements

in %

Chart visual
Base salary

Base salary levels and any adjustments made by the Supervisory Board are based on factors including the median Quantum Peer Group data, performance and experience of the individual member and internal relativities. The annual review date for the base salary is typically April 1, and the individual salary levels are shown in the annual report of the company.

Annual Incentive

Each year, a variable Annual Incentive (cash bonus) can be earned based on the achievement of specific targets against criteria as determined at the beginning of the year by the Remuneration Committee on behalf of the Supervisory Board. These targets are set at challenging levels and are partly linked to the results of the company (80% weighting) and partly to the contribution of the individual member (20% weighting).

The Annual Incentive criteria and targets consists of:

  1. two to four key financial indicators of the company, selected from the following list: profit/margin, revenue/growth, cash flow, shareholder/capital return measures, such as ROA, ROE, ROIC and economic/market value added measures; and
  2. individual targets based on area of responsibility. As part of this element, the Remuneration Committee will also consider including non-financial targets, as appropriate, that are linked to strategic objectives, such as sustainability, quality and compliance.

The Annual Incentive pay-out in any year relates to the achievements of the preceding financial year versus agreed targets. Metrics will be disclosed ex-ante in the annual report and there will be no retroactive changes to the selection of metrics used in any given year once approved by the Supervisory Board and disclosed.

Long-Term Incentive

Members of the Board of Management are eligible for grants under the company’s 2017 Long-Term Incentive (LTI) Plan. The 2017 LTI Plan consists of performance shares only.

Grant size

The annual award size is set by reference to a multiple of base salary. For the President/CEO the annual award size is set at 200% of base salary. For the other members of the Board of Management the annual award size is set at 150% of base salary. The actual number of performance shares to be awarded is determined by reference to the average of the closing price of the Royal Philips share on the day of publication of the first quarterly results and the four subsequent trading days.

Vesting schedule

Dependent upon the achievement of the performance conditions, cliff-vesting applies three years after the date of grant. During the vesting period, the value of dividends will be added to the performance shares in the form of shares. These dividend-equivalent shares will only be delivered to the extent that the award actually vests.

Performance conditions

Vesting of the performance shares is based on two equally weighted performance conditions:

  • 50% Adjusted Earnings per Share (EPS) growth; and
  • 50% Relative Total Shareholder Return (TSR)
EPS

EPS growth is calculated by applying a simple point-to-point method at year end. Earnings are the income from continued operations attributable to shareholders, as reported in the Annual Report. To eliminate the impact of any share buyback, stock dividend etcetera, the number of shares to be used for the purpose of the LTI Plan EPS realization will be the number of common shares outstanding (after deduction of treasury shares) on the day prior to the beginning of the performance period.

Earnings are adjusted for changes in accounting principles during the performance period. The Supervisory Board has discretion to include other adjustments, for example, to account for events that were not planned when targets were set or were outside management’s control (e.g., impairments, restructuring activities, pension items, M&A transactions and costs and currency fluctuations).

The following performance-incentive zone applies for the LTI Plan EPS:

Philips Group

Performance-incentive zone for LTI Plan EPS

i

n %

2019

Below threshold

Threshold

Target

Maximum

Payout

0

40

100

200

The LTI Plan EPS targets are set annually by the Supervisory Board upon the proposal of the Remuneration Committee. Given that these targets are considered to be company sensitive, LTI Plan EPS targets and the achieved performance are published in the Annual Report after the relevant performance period.

TSR

A ranking approach to TSR applies with Philips itself included in the TSR Performance Peer Group. TSR scores are calculated based on a local currency approach and by taking an averaging period prior to the start and end of the 3-year performance period. The performance incentive pay-out zone is outlined in the following table, which results in zero vesting for performance below the 40th percentile and 200% vesting for performance levels above the 75th percentile. The incentive zone range has been constructed such that the average pay-out over time is expected to be approximately 100%.

Philips Group

Performance-incentive zone for TSR

in %

2019

Position

20-14

13

12

11

10

9

8

7

6

5-1

Payout

0

60

80

100

120

140

160

180

190

200

Mandatory share ownership and holding requirement

Simultaneously with the approval of the revised LTI Plan in 2017, the guideline for members of the Board of Management to hold a certain number of shares in the Company was increased to the level of at least 300% of annual base compensation (400% for the CEO). Until this level has been reached the members of the Board of Management are required to retain all after-tax shares derived from any long-term incentive plan. The guideline does not require own purchases. All Board of Management members have reached the required share ownership level.

The shares granted under the Long-Term Incentive Plan shall be retained for a period of at least 5 years or until at least the end of their contract period if this period is shorter.

Pensions

Effective January 1, 2015 pension plans which allow pension accrual based on a pensionable salary exceeding an amount in 2019 of EUR 107,593 are, for fiscal purposes, considered to be non-qualifying schemes. For this reason the Executive Pension Plan in the Netherlands was terminated.

The following pension arrangement is in place for the current members of the Board of Management working under a Dutch contract:

  • Flex ES Pension Plan in the Netherlands, which is a Collective Defined Contribution plan with a fixed contribution of (currently) 30.3% (including an own contribution of 2%) of the maximum pensionable salary of EUR 107,593 (effective January 1, 2019) minus the offset. The Flex ES Plan has a target retirement age of 67 and a target accrual rate of 1.85%;
  • A gross Pension Allowance equal to 25% of the base compensation exceeding EUR 107,593;
  • A temporary gross Transition Allowance, for a maximum period of 8 years (first 5 years in full; year 6: 75%; year 7: 50%, year 8: 25%) for members of the Board who were participants of the former Executive Pension Plan. The level of the allowance is based on the age and salary of the Board member on December 31, 2014.
Services agreements

The members of the Board of Management are engaged by means of a services agreement (overeenkomst van opdracht). Termination of the contract by either party is subject to six months’ notice period. The severance payment is set at a maximum of one year’s annual base compensation. No severance payment is due in case the agreement is terminated early on behalf of the Board of Management member or in case of urgent cause (dringende reden) as defined in article 7:678 DCC and further. The term of the services agreement is aligned with the term for which the relevant member has been appointed by the General Meeting of Shareholders (which is maximum period of four years, it being understood that this period expires no later than at the end of the AGM held in the fourth year after the year of appointment).

Philips Group

Contract terms for current members

2019

end of term

F.A. van Houten

AGM 2023

A. Bhattacharya

AGM 2023

M.J. van Ginneken

AGM 2021

Additional arrangements

In addition to the main conditions as stipulated in the services agreements, a number of additional arrangements apply to members of the Board of Management.

Unless the law provides otherwise, the members of the Board of Management shall be reimbursed by the company for various costs and expenses, like reasonable costs of defending claims, as formalized in the Articles of Association. Under certain circumstances, described in the Articles of Association, such as an action or failure to act by a member of the Board of Management that can be characterized as intentional (“opzettelijk”), intentionally reckless (“bewust roekeloos”) or seriously culpable (“ernstig verwijtbaar”), there will be no entitlement to this reimbursement. The Company has also taken out liability insurance (D&O - Directors & Officers) for the persons concerned.

Remuneration of the Board of Management in 2019

Annual Base Compensation changes

The annual compensation of the members of the Board of Management has been reviewed as part of the regular remuneration review. In the case of Frans van Houten and Abhijit Bhattacharya, the annual compensation was included in the services contracts as published in advance of the 2019 Annual General Meeting of Shareholders. As a result, the annual compensation of Frans van Houten, Abhijit Bhattacharya and Marnix van Ginneken has been increased per April 1, 2019, from EUR 1,205,000 to EUR 1,325,000, from EUR 725,000 to EUR 785,000 and from EUR 560,000 to EUR 575,000 respectively. The increases were made to move the total compensation levels closer to market levels, as well as to reflect internal relativities.

2019 Annual Incentive
Company financial results (80% weighting)

To support the performance culture, the financial targets we set are at group level for all members of the Board of Management. The 2019 realizations, shown in the following table, reflect the performance on the criteria at Group level that apply to the Board of Management. The performance on the comparable sales growth*) criterion was at target, whereas the performance on the EBITA*) and free cash flow*) based criteria were below target.

Philips Group

Annual Incentive - Financial targets

in %

2019

Metric definition

weighting

threshold performance

target performance

maximum performance

realized performance

resulting payout as % of target

Comparable Sales Growth1)

37.5%

2.5%

4.5%

6.5%

100.0%

37.5%

EBITA1)

37.5%

10.5%

12.5%

14.5%

67.5%

25.3%

Free Cash Flow1)

25.0%

672

1,050

1,428

70.9%

17.7%

Total

80.5%

Individual targets based on area of responsibility (20% weighting)

The individual targets set for the members of the Board of Management reflect their area of responsibility and are tied to, among others, customer focus, quality, strategy execution, sustainability and people. Based on a holistic assessment of all targets by the Supervisory Board, the following resulting payouts have been determined:

Philips Group

Annual Incentive - Individual targets

in %

2019

resulting payout as % of target

F.A. van Houten

90.0%

A. Bhattacharya

90.0%

M.J. van Ginneken

95.0%

When applying the 80% and 20% weightings to the resulting payout as % of target for the financial and individual targets, respectively, this leads to the following total Annual Incentive realization and payout:

Philips Group

Annual Incentive realization

in EUR

2019 (payout in 2020)

realized annual incentive

total payout as % of target

as a % of base compensation (2019)

F.A. van Houten

1,091,800

82.40%

82.40%

A. Bhattacharya

517,472

82.40%

65.90%

M.J. van Ginneken

335,685

83.40%

58.40%

*)Non-IFRS financial measure. For the definition and reconciliation of the most directly comparable IFRS measure, refer to Reconciliation of non-IFRS information.
2017 Long-Term Incentive

The 3-year performance period of the 2017 performance share grant ended on December 31, 2019. The payout results are explained below.

TSR (50% weighting)

The TSR achieved by Philips during the performance period was 60.89%. This resulted in Philips being positioned at rank 7 in the TSR performance peer group shown in the following table, resulting in a LTI Plan TSR achievement of 180%.

TSR results LTI Plan 2017 grant: 60.89%

Total Shareholder Return ranking per December 31, 2019

Start date: October 2016

End date: December 2019

Company

total return

rank number

ResMed

146.69%

1

Boston Scientific

91.77%

2

Terumo

88.15%

3

Stryker

86.87%

4

Danaher

85.31%

5

Elekta

64.60%

6

Philips

60.89%

7

Smith & Nephew

58.31%

8

Becton Dickinson

56.49%

9

Hitachi

54.59%

10

Medtronic

49.20%

11

Getinge

33.59%

12

Cerner

30.97%

13

Hologic

29.02%

14

Johnson & Johnson

27.15%

15

Siemens

12.11%

16

Groupe SEB

9.57%

17

De Longhi

(8.83)%

18

Fresenius Medical

(11.83)%

19

General Electric

(61.84)%

20

Adjusted EPS growth (50% weighting)

The LTI Plan EPS payouts and targets set at the beginning of the performance period were as follows:

Philips Group

LTI Plan EPS payouts

2019

Below threshold

Threshold

Target

Maximum

EPS (euro)

<1.05

1.05

1.20

1.35

Payout

0%

40%

100%

200%

LTI Plan EPS is based on the underlying income from continuing operations attributable to shareholders, as included in the Annual Report, adjusted for changes in accounting principles. Furthermore, the Supervisory Board has also deemed it appropriate to make adjustments relating to certain other items that were not contemplated when the targets were set in 2017. These relate to the profit and loss impact of acquisitions and divestitures, impact of foreign exchange variations versus plan and non-recurring tax impacts. The sum of these adjustments reduced the achieved LTI Plan EPS by EUR 0.30.

The resulting LTI Plan EPS achievement was determined by the Supervisory Board as 64%.

In view of the above, the following performance achievement and vesting levels have been determined by the Supervisory Board in respect of the 2017 grant of performance shares:

Philips Group

Performance achievement and vesting levels

2019

achievement

weighting

vesting level

TSR

180%

50%

90%

EPS

64%

50%

32%

total

122%

Total remuneration costs in 2019

The following table gives an overview of the costs incurred by the company in 2019 in relation to the remuneration of the Board of Management. Costs related to performance shares and restricted share right grants are taken by the company over a number of years. Therefore, the costs mentioned below in the performance shares and restricted share rights columns are the accounting cost of multi-year Long-Term Incentive grants to members of the Board of Management.

Philips Group

Remuneration Board of Management1)

in EUR

2019

Costs in the year

annual base compen­sation2)

base compen­sation

realized annual incentive

perfor­mance shares3)

restricted share rights

pension allowan­ces4)

pension scheme costs

other compen­sation5)

total cost

F.A. van Houten

1,325,000

1,295,000

1,091,800

2,235,166

-

559,052

26,380

52,713

5,260,111

A. Bhattacharya

785,000

770,000

517,472

995,483

-

230,006

26,380

63,265

2,602,606

M.J. van Ginneken

575,000

571,250

335,685

713,815

-

171,018

26,380

38,278

1,856,426

2,636,250

1,944,957

3,944,464

-

960,076

79,140

154,256

9,719,143

For further details on the pension allowances and pension scheme costs see Pensions.

Further details on historical LTI grants and holdings
Number of performance shares (holdings)

Under the LTI Plan the current members of the Board of Management were granted 125,019 performance shares in 2019.

The following table provides an overview at end December 2019 of performance share grants. The reference date for board membership is December 31, 2019.

Philips Group

Number of performance shares (holdings)

in number of shares unless otherwise stated

2019

grant date

number of shares originally granted

value at grant date

vesting date

end of holding period

unvested opening balance at Jan. 1, 2019

number of shares awarded in 2019

(dividend) shares awarded

number of shares vested in 20191)

value at vesting date in 2019

unvested closing balance at Dec. 31, 2019

F.A. van Houten

4/29/2016

59,287

1,446,000

4/29/2019

4/29/2021

64,303

-

-

92,596

3,435,312

-

5/11/2017

73,039

2,410,000

5/11/2020

5/11/2022

76,571

-

1,841

-

-

78,413

4/27/2018

69,005

2,410,000

4/27/2021

4/27/2023

70,566

-

1,697

-

-

72,262

5/6/2019

70,640

2,650,000

5/6/2022

5/6/2024

-

70,640

1,699

-

-

72,339

A. Bhattacharya

4/29/2016

26,650

2)

650,000

4/29/2019

4/29/2021

28,905

-

-

41,623

1,544,213

-

5/11/2017

31,822

1,050,000

5/11/2020

5/11/2022

33,361

-

802

-

-

34,163

4/27/2018

31,138

1,087,500

4/27/2021

4/27/2023

31,842

-

766

-

-

32,608

5/6/2019

31,388

1,177,500

5/6/2022

5/6/2024

-

31,388

755

-

-

32,143

M.J. van Ginneken

4/29/2016

20,972

2)

511,500

4/29/2019

4/29/2021

22,746

-

-

32,755

1,215,211

-

5/11/2017

18,563

2)

612,500

5/11/2020

5/11/2022

19,461

-

468

-

-

19,929

4/27/2018

24,052

840,000

4/27/2021

4/27/2023

24,596

-

591

-

-

25,187

5/6/2019

22,991

862,500

5/6/2022

5/6/2024

-

22,991

553

-

-

23,544

Number of stock options (holdings)

The tables below give an overview of the stock options held by the members of the Board of Management.

Philips Group

Stock options (holdings)

in number of shares unless otherwise stated

2019

grant date

vesting date

exercise price (in EUR)

expiry date

opening balance at January 1, 2019

number of stock options awarded in 2019

number of stock options exercised in 2019

share (closing) price on exercise date

number of stock options expired in 2019

closing balance at December 31, 2019

F.A. van Houten

10/18/2010

10/18/2013

22.88

10/18/2020

20,400

-

20,400

42.17

-

-

4/18/2011

4/18/2014

20.90

4/18/2021

75,000

-

-

-

-

75,000

4/23/2012

4/23/2015

14.82

4/23/2022

75,000

-

-

-

-

75,000

1/29/2013

1/29/2014

22.43

1/29/2023

55,000

-

-

-

-

55,000

A. Bhattacharya

10/18/2010

10/18/2013

22.88

10/18/2020

16,500

-

16,500

42.20

-

-

4/18/2011

4/18/2014

20.90

4/18/2021

16,500

-

-

-

-

16,500

1/30/2012

1/30/2014

15.24

1/30/2022

20,000

-

-

-

-

20,000

4/23/2012

4/23/2015

14.82

4/23/2022

16,500

-

-

-

-

16,500

M.J. van Ginneken

4/14/2009

4/14/2012

12.63

4/14/2019

5,250

-

5,250

33.24

-

-

4/19/2010

4/19/2013

24.90

4/19/2020

6,720

-

-

-

-

6,720

4/18/2011

4/18/2014

20.90

4/18/2021

8,400

-

-

-

-

8,400

1/30/2012

1/30/2014

15.24

1/30/2022

10,000

-

-

-

-

10,000

4/23/2012

4/23/2015

14.82

4/23/2022

8,400

-

-

-

-

8,400

Comparison of change in CEO and BoM versus average employee remuneration costs and company performance

In line with the Dutch Corporate Governance Code and Dutch law, internal pay ratios are an important input for determining the Remuneration Policy for the Board of Management. For the 2019 financial year, the ratio between the annual total compensation for the CEO and the average annual total compensation for an employee was 60:1. The ratio increased/decreased from 63:1 in 2018. Further details on the development of these amounts and ratios over time can be found in the table below.

Philips Group

Remuneration cost

in EUR

2019

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

CEO Total Remuneration Costs (A)1)

3,890,265

4,675,042

5,101,429

5,391,265

5,260,111

CFO Total Remuneration Cost

2)

1,856,175

2,247,822

2,595,688

2,602,606

CLO Total Remuneration Cost

2)

1,861,200

1,856,426

Chief Business Leader Personal Health Total Remuneration Cost

2,097,119

2,373,642

3)

Average Employee (FTE) Total Remuneration Costs (B)4)

97,237

86,074

91,288

86,136

87,321

Ratio A versus B5)

40:1

54:1

56:1

63:1

60:1

Company performance [annual TSR]6)

7.12%

18.38%

26.51%

1.22%

25.62%

Remuneration of the Supervisory Board in 2019

The remuneration levels for the Supervisory Board were determined by our shareholders during the 2018 Extraordinary General Meeting of Shareholders, upon the proposal of the Supervisory Board.

The remuneration of the Supervisory Board is not tied to the performance of the company in any way, which serves the company through guaranteeing independent supervision and is in line with the Dutch Corporate Governance Code.

The table below provides an overview of the current remuneration structure:

Philips Group

Remuneration Supervisory Board

in EUR

2019

Chair

Vice Chair

Member

Supervisory Board

155,000

115,000

100,000

Audit Committee

27,000

n.a.

18,000

Remuneration Committee

21,000

n.a.

14,000

Corporate Governance and Nomination & Selection Committee

21,000

n.a.

14,000

Quality & Regulatory Committee

21,000

n.a.

14,000

Attendance fee per inter-European trip

2,500

2,500

2,500

Attendance fee per intercontinental trip

5,000

5,000

5,000

Entitlement to Philips product arrangement

2,000

2,000

2,000

The individual members of the Supervisory Board received, by virtue of the positions they held, the following remuneration in 2019:

Philips Group

Remuneration of the Supervisory Board1)

i

n EUR

2019

membership

committees

other compensation2)

total

20193)

J. van der Veer

155,000

35,000

7,000

197,000

C.A. Poon

115,000

50,167

22,000

187,167

H.N.F.M. von Prondzynski

33,333

16,333

5,667

55,333

J.P. Tai

25,000

10,250

5,500

40,750

N. Dhawan

100,000

18,000

27,000

145,000

O. Gadiesh

100,000

19,833

12,000

131,833

D.E.I. Pyott

100,000

41,500

17,000

158,500

P.A.M. Stoffels

100,000

-

14,500

114,500

A.M. Harrison

100,000

9,333

12,000

121,333

M.E. Doherty

41,667

1,500

8,333

51,500

870,000

201,917

131,000

1,202,917

8.3Report of the Audit Committee

The Audit Committee is currently chaired by David Pyott, and its other members are Neelam Dhawan and Liz Doherty. Jeroen van der Veer also regularly participates in Audit Committee meetings. The Committee assists the Supervisory Board in fulfilling its supervisory responsibilities for, among other things, ensuring the integrity of the company’s financial statements, reviewing the company’s internal controls and enterprise risk management.

The Audit Committee met five times during 2019 and reported its findings to the plenary Supervisory Board. All Audit Committee members were present during these meetings.

The CEO, the CFO, the Chief Legal Officer, the Head of Internal Audit, the Group Chief Accountant and the external auditor (Ernst & Young Accountants LLP) attended all regular meetings.

Furthermore, the Committee met separately, together with the Chief Legal Officer, with each of the CEO, the CFO, the Head of Internal Audit and the external auditor. In addition, the Audit Committee chair met one-on-one with the above and also with the Group Treasurer and the Group Chief Accountant, prior to Committee meetings.

The overview below indicates a number of matters that were reviewed and/or discussed during Committee meetings throughout 2019:

  • The company’s 2019 annual and interim financial statements, including non-financial information, prior to publication. In its quarterly meetings, the Committee also assessed the adequacy and appropriateness of internal control policies and execution, as well as internal audit programs and findings;
  • The re-alignment of the company’s reporting segments;
  • Matters relating to accounting policies, financial risks, reporting and compliance with accounting standards. Compliance with statutory and legal requirements and regulations, particularly in the financial domain, was also reviewed. Important findings, Philips’ top and emerging areas of risk (including the internal auditor’s reporting thereon, and the Chief Legal Officer’s review of litigation and other claims) and follow-up actions and appropriate measures were examined thoroughly;
  • Each quarter, the Committee reviewed the company’s cash flow generation, liquidity and financing headroom, its ability under its capital structure and credit ratings, to pay dividends and to fund capital investments, including share repurchases and other financial initiatives. The Committee also monitored ongoing goodwill impairment indicators and reviewed the goodwill impairment tests performed in the fourth quarter, risk management, information and cybersecurity risks, legal compliance and developments in regulatory investigations as well as legal proceedings including antitrust investigations and related provisions;
  • Specific finance topics included dividend policy, share repurchases, capital spending and the company’s debt financing strategy;
  • The Committee reviewed Philips’ Enterprise Risk Management, which included an annual risk assessment and discussion of Philips’ top and emerging risks and mitigating actions;
  • The Committee engaged in a post-investment review of projects in the area of Information Technology, Research & Development, Real Estate and Restructuring and assessed the actual spend and timing of such projects against the original budget and timing;
  • The Committee was updated on the company’s continuous efforts and major achievements in establishing a strong compliance culture in China;
  • With regard to Internal Audit, the Committee reviewed and approved the revised Internal Audit charter, audit plan, audit scope and its coverage in relation to the scope of the external audit, as well as the staffing, independence, performance and organizational structure of the Internal Audit function;
  • With regard to the external auditor, the Committee reviewed the performance of the external auditor in conducting the group and statutory audits as required by the Auditor Policy, and evaluated the proposal for re-appointment of Ernst & Young Accountants LLP. Subsequently, Ernst & Young Accountants LLP was re-appointed as external auditor for a term of three years, starting on January 1, 2020, at the 2019 Annual General Meeting of Shareholders;
  • With regard to the external audit, the Committee reviewed the proposed audit scope, including key audit areas, approach and fees, the non-audit services provided by the external auditor in conformity with the Philips Auditor Policy, as well as any changes to this policy;
  • The Committee reviewed the independence as well as the professional fitness and good standing of the external auditor and its engagement partners. For information on the fees of the Group auditor, please refer to ‘Audit fees’ in the note Income from operations;
  • The company’s policy on business controls, legal compliance and the General Business Principles (including deployment). The Committee was informed on, and discussed and monitored closely the company’s internal control certification processes, in particular compliance with section 404 of the US Sarbanes-Oxley Act and its requirements regarding assessment, review and monitoring of internal controls. It also discussed on a regular basis the developments in and findings relating to conduct resulting from investigations into alleged violations of the General Business Principles and, if required, any measures taken.

In February 2020, the Committee also reviewed the key audit matters and the critical audit matters identified by the Auditor in relation to the 2019 financial statements, included in the Annual Report 2019 and the Annual Report on Form 20-F respectively.

During each Audit Committee meeting, the Committee reviewed the quarterly report from the external auditor, in which the auditor set forth its findings and attention points during the relevant period. Apart from the Audit Committee meetings, the external auditor also attended all private sessions with the Audit Committee, where their observations were further discussed. The Annual Audit Letter was circulated to the full Supervisory Board, and planned actions to address the items raised were discussed with Management in the subsequent Audit Committee meetings and also in private sessions with Management.

Finally, the Committee also reviewed its own Charter and concluded that it was satisfactory.

8.4Report of the Quality & Regulatory Committee

The Quality & Regulatory Committee was established in view of the importance of the Quality of the company’s products, systems, services, and software. The Committee provides broad oversight of compliance with the regulatory requirements that govern the development, manufacturing, marketing and servicing of the company’s products. The Quality & Regulatory Committee assists the Supervisory Board in fulfilling its oversight responsibilities in these areas. It is chaired by David Pyott and its members are Christine Poon and Marc Harrison.

The Quality & Regulatory Committee met eight times in 2019. All Committee members were present during these meetings, with the exception of one member, who was unable to attend the January and October Committee meetings and one member who was unable to attend the June and December Committee meeting. The Chief Executive Officer, the Chief Legal Officer and the Chief Quality Officer were present during these meetings.

The overview below indicates some of the matters that were discussed during meetings throughout 2019:

  • Adherence to the company’s Quality Management System, including the global transformation initiatives around customer-centric risk management, complaint handling and post-market surveillance monitoring of supplier quality performance, management of supplier performance, supply base enhancement and the product development lifecycle management process;
  • Quality and regulatory dashboards, which display key performance indicators for businesses and markets, measuring performance and continuous improvement to enhance quality and compliance;
  • The discretionary quality and regulatory multiplier applied to the 2018 Annual Incentive realization of the Executive Committee members as well as the alignment of performance and rewards throughout the organization;
  • The status and outcome of quality & regulatory investigations and related matters, including the progress made in line with the terms of the Consent Decree with the US Department of Justice, representing the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), focusing primarily on Philips’ defibrillator manufacturing in the US;
  • Regulatory developments, including the company’s preparations to implement the EU Medical Device Regulation;
  • Review of progress in the development of talent and capabilities in the company’s Quality & Regulatory function;
  • The budgeted 2020 human and financial resources for the company’s Quality & Regulatory function.

9Corporate governance

9.1Introduction

Koninklijke Philips N.V. (Royal Philips), a company organized under Dutch law, is the parent company of the Philips group. Its shares have been listed on the Amsterdam stock exchange (Euronext Amsterdam) since 1912. Furthermore, its shares have been traded in the United States since 1962 and have been listed on the New York Stock Exchange since 1987.

Royal Philips has a two-tier board structure consisting of a Board of Management and a Supervisory Board, each of which is accountable to the General Meeting of Shareholders for the fulfillment of its respective duties.

The company is governed by Dutch corporate and securities laws, its Articles of Association, and the Rules of Procedure of the Board of Management and the Executive Committee and of the Supervisory Board respectively. Its corporate governance framework is also based on the Dutch Corporate Governance Code (dated December 8, 2016) and US laws and regulations applicable to Foreign Private Issuers. Additionally, the Board of Management has implemented the Philips General Business Principles (GBP) and underlying policies, as well as separate codes of ethics that apply to employees working in specific areas of our business, i.e. the Financial Code of Ethics and the Procurement Code of Ethics. Many of the documents referred to are published on the company’s website and more information can be found in Our approach to risk management.

In this section of the Annual Report, the company addresses the main elements of its corporate governance structure, reports on how it applies the principles and best practices of the Dutch Corporate Governance Code and provides the information required by the Dutch governmental Decree on Corporate Governance (Besluit inhoud bestuursverslag) and governmental Decree on Article 10 Takeover Directive (Besluit artikel 10 overnamerichtlijn). When deemed necessary in the interests of the company, the company may deviate from aspects of the company’s corporate governance structure, and any such deviations will be disclosed in the company’s corporate governance report.

In compliance with the Dutch Corporate Governance Code, other parts of the management report (within the meaning of section 2:391 of the Dutch Civil Code) included in the Annual Report address the strategy and culture of Philips aimed at long-term value creation. Philips' strategy is described in more detail in Strategy and Businesses. Here, reference is also made to the Philips Business System, an interdependent, collaborative operating model that covers all aspects of how we operate – strategy, governance, processes, people, culture and performance management. As set out in Social performance, Philips promotes a behavior and competency-driven growth and performance culture, which is anchored by the integrity norms described in the GBP. The Message from the CEO explains how the company’s strategy was executed in 2019; in this regard, please refer also to Financial performance.

9.2Board of Management and Executive Committee

Introduction

The Board of Management is entrusted with the management of the company. Certain key officers have been appointed to support the Board of Management in the fulfilment of its managerial duties. The members of the Board of Management and these key officers together constitute the Executive Committee. In this Corporate Governance report, wherever the Executive Committee is mentioned, this also includes the members of the Board of Management, unless the context requires otherwise. Please refer to Board of Management and Executive Committee for an overview of the current members of the Board of Management and the Executive Committee.

Under the chairmanship of the President/Chief Executive Officer (CEO), and supported by the other members of the Executive Committee, the members of the Board of Management drive the company’s management agenda and share responsibility for the continuity of the Philips group, focusing on long-term value creation. Please refer to the Rules of Procedure of the Board of Management and the Executive Committee, which are published on the company’s website, for a description of further responsibilities and tasks, as well as procedures for meetings, resolutions and minutes.

In fulfilling their duties, the members of the Board of Management and Executive Committee shall be guided by the interests of the company and its affiliated enterprise, taking into account the interests of shareholders and other stakeholders. The Board of Management and the Executive Committee have adopted a division of responsibilities based on the functional and business areas, each of which is monitored and reviewed by the individual members. The Board of Management is accountable for the actions and decisions of the Executive Committee and has ultimate responsibility for the company’s external reporting (including reporting to the shareholders of the company).

The Board of Management and the Executive Committee are supervised by the Supervisory Board. Members of the Board of Management and the Executive Committee will be present in the meetings of the Supervisory Board if so invited. In addition, the CEO and other members of the Board of Management (and if needed, the other members of the Executive Committee) meet on a regular basis with the Chairman and other members of the Supervisory Board. The Board of Management and the Executive Committee are required to keep the Supervisory Board informed of all facts and developments concerning Philips that the Supervisory Board may need to be aware of in order to function as required and to properly carry out its duties.

Certain important decisions of the Board of Management require Supervisory Board approval, including decisions concerning the operational and financial objectives of the company and the strategy designed to achieve these objectives, the issue, repurchase or cancellation of shares, and major acquisitions or divestments.

Appointment and composition

Members of the Board of Management, including the CEO, are appointed by the General Meeting of Shareholders upon a binding recommendation drawn up by the Supervisory Board after consultation with the CEO. This binding recommendation may be overruled by a resolution of the General Meeting of Shareholders adopted by a simple majority of the votes cast and representing at least one-third of the issued share capital. If a simple majority of the votes cast is in favor of the resolution to overrule the binding recommendation, but such majority does not represent at least one-third of the issued share capital, a new meeting may be convened, at which the resolution may be passed by a simple majority of the votes cast, regardless of the portion of the issued share capital represented by such majority. In the event that a binding recommendation has been overruled, a new binding recommendation shall be submitted to the General Meeting of Shareholders. If such second binding recommendation has been overruled, the General Meeting of Shareholders shall be free to appoint a board member.

The CEO and the other members of the Board of Management are appointed for a term of four years, it being understood that this term expires at the closing of the General Meeting of Shareholders to be held in the fourth calendar year after the year of their appointment or, if applicable, at a later retirement date or other contractual termination date in the fourth year, unless the General Meeting of Shareholders resolves otherwise. The same applies in the case of re-appointment, which is possible for consecutive terms of four years. A (re-)appointment schedule for the Board of Management is published on the company’s website.

Pursuant to Dutch law, the members of the Board of Management are engaged by means of a services agreement (overeenkomst van opdracht). The term of the services agreement is aligned with the term for which the relevant member has been appointed by the General Meeting of Shareholders. In case of termination of the services agreement by the company, severance payment is limited to a maximum of one year’s base salary. The services agreements provide no additional termination benefits.

Members of the Board of Management may be suspended by the Supervisory Board and by the General Meeting of Shareholders and members of the Board of Management may be dismissed by the General Meeting of Shareholders (in each case in accordance with the Articles of Association). The other members of the Executive Committee are appointed, suspended and dismissed by the CEO, subject to approval by the Supervisory Board.

9.3Supervisory Board

Introduction

The Supervisory Board supervises the policies and management and the general affairs of Philips, and assists the Board of Management and the Executive Committee with advice on general policies related to the activities of the company. In fulfilling their duties, the members of the Supervisory Board shall be guided by the interests of the company and its affiliated enterprise, taking into account the interests of shareholders and other stakeholders.

In the two-tier corporate structure under Dutch law, the Supervisory Board is a separate body that is independent of the Board of Management and the company. Its independent character is also reflected in the requirement that members of the Supervisory Board can be neither a member of the Board of Management nor an employee of the company. The Supervisory Board considers all its members to be independent under the Dutch Corporate Governance Code. Furthermore, the members of its Audit Committee are independent under the applicable US rules.

The Supervisory Board must approve certain important decisions of the Board of Management, including decisions concerning the operational and financial objectives of the company and the strategy designed to achieve these objectives, the issue, repurchase or cancellation of shares and major acquisitions or divestments. The Supervisory Board and its individual members each have a responsibility to request from the Board of Management, the Executive Committee and the external auditor all information that the Supervisory Board needs in order to be able to carry out its duties properly as a supervisory body.

Please refer to the Rules of Procedure of the Supervisory Board, which are published on the company’s website, for a description of further responsibilities and tasks, as well as procedures for meetings, resolutions and minutes.

In its report (included in the company’s Annual Report), the Supervisory Board describes the composition and functioning of the Supervisory Board and its committees, their activities in the financial year, the number of committee meetings held and the main items discussed. Please refer to Supervisory Board report. Please also refer to Supervisory Board for an overview of the current members of the Supervisory Board.

Appointment and composition

Members of the Supervisory Board are appointed by the General Meeting of Shareholders upon a binding recommendation drawn up by the Supervisory Board. This binding recommendation may be overruled by a resolution of the General Meeting of Shareholders adopted by a simple majority of the votes cast and representing at least one-third of the issued share capital. If a simple majority of the votes cast is in favor of the resolution to overrule the binding recommendation, but such majority does not represent at least one-third of the issued share capital, a new meeting may be convened. At this new meeting the resolution may be passed by a simple majority of the votes cast, regardless of the portion of the issued share capital represented by such majority. In the event that a binding recommendation has been overruled, a new binding recommendation shall be submitted to the General Meeting of Shareholders. If such second binding recommendation has been overruled, the General Meeting of Shareholders shall be free to appoint a board member.

The term of appointment of members of the Supervisory Board expires at the closing of the General Meeting of Shareholders to be held after a period of four years following their appointment. There is no age limit requiring the retirement of board members.

In line with the Dutch Corporate Governance Code, members of the Supervisory Board are eligible for re-appointment for a fixed term of four years once, and may subsequently be re-appointed for a period of two years, which appointment may be extended by at most two years. The report of the Supervisory Board must state the reasons for any re-appointment beyond an eight-year period. A (re-)appointment schedule for the Supervisory Board is published on the company’s website.

Members of the Supervisory Board may be suspended or dismissed by the General Meeting of Shareholders in accordance with the Articles of Association.

Candidates for appointment to the Supervisory Board are selected taking into account the company’s Diversity Policy, which is published on the company’s website. The Supervisory Board’s composition furthermore follows the profile included in the Rules of Procedure of the Supervisory Board, and the size of the board may vary as it considers appropriate to support its profile. Please refer to Composition, diversity and self-evaluation by the Supervisory Board.

Supervisory Board committees

The Supervisory Board, while retaining overall responsibility, has assigned certain tasks to four committees: the Corporate Governance and Nomination & Selection Committee, the Audit Committee, the Remuneration Committee, and the Quality & Regulatory Committee. Each committee reports to the full Supervisory Board. Please refer to the charters of the respective committees, which are published on the company’s website as part of the Rules of Procedure of the Supervisory Board, for a description of their responsibilities, composition, meetings and working procedures.

The Corporate Governance and Nomination & Selection Committee is responsible for preparing selection criteria and appointment procedures for members of the Supervisory Board, the Board of Management and the Executive Committee. The Committee makes proposals to the Supervisory Board for the (re)appointment of such members, and periodically assesses their functioning. The Committee also periodically assesses the Diversity Policy, and supervises the policy of the Executive Committee on the selection criteria and appointment procedures for Philips executives. At least once a year, the Committee reviews the corporate governance principles applicable to the company, and advises the Supervisory Board on any changes to these principles that it deems appropriate.

The Remuneration Committee is responsible for preparing decisions of the Supervisory Board on the remuneration of individual members of the Board of Management and the Executive Committee. The Committee prepares an annual remuneration report, which is included in the Annual Report. In performing its duties and responsibilities, the Remuneration Committee is assisted by an external consultant and an in-house remuneration expert acting on the basis of a protocol to ensure that the expert acts on the instructions of the Remuneration Committee and on an independent basis in which conflicts of interest are avoided.

The Audit Committee assists the Supervisory Board in fulfilling its oversight responsibilities for: the integrity of the company’s financial statements; the financial reporting process; the effectiveness (also in respect of the financial reporting process) of the system of internal controls and risk management; the internal and external audit process; the internal and external auditor’s qualifications, independence and performance; as well as the company’s process for monitoring compliance with laws and regulations and the GBP (including related manuals, training and tools). It reviews the company’s annual and interim financial statements, including non-financial information, prior to publication and advises the Supervisory Board on the adequacy and appropriateness of internal control policies and internal audit programs and their findings. The Committee furthermore supervises the internal audit function, maintains contact with and supervises the external auditor and prepares the nomination of the external auditor for appointment by the General Meeting of Shareholders.

The composition of the Audit Committee meets the relevant requirements under Dutch law and the applicable US rules. All of the members are considered to be independent and financially literate and the Audit Committee as a whole has the competence relevant to the sector in which the company is operating. In addition, David Pyott and Elizabeth Doherty are each designated as an Audit Committee financial expert, as defined under the regulations of the US Securities and Exchange Commission. The Supervisory Board considers the expertise and experience available in the Audit Committee, in conjunction with the possibility to take advice from internal and external experts and advisors, to be sufficient for the fulfillment of the tasks and responsibilities of the Audit Committee.

The Quality & Regulatory Committee has been established by the Supervisory Board in view of the central importance of the quality of the company’s products, systems, services and software as well as the development, testing, manufacturing, marketing and servicing thereof, and the regulatory requirements relating thereto. The Quality & Regulatory Committee assists the Supervisory Board in fulfilling its oversight responsibilities in this area, whilst recognizing that the Audit Committee assists the Supervisory Board in its oversight of other areas of regulatory, compliance and legal matters.

9.5General Meeting of Shareholders

Meetings

The Annual General Meeting of Shareholders shall be held no later than six months after the end of the financial year. The agenda for the meeting typically includes: implementation of the remuneration policies for the Board of Management and the Supervisory Board; discussion of the Annual Report, the adoption of the financial statements; policy on additions to reserves and dividends; any proposed dividends or other distributions; discharge of the members of the Board of Management and the Supervisory Board; any other matters proposed by the Supervisory Board, the Board of Management or shareholders in accordance with Dutch law and the Articles of Association.

Shareholders’ meetings are convened by public notice via the company’s website, and registered shareholders are notified by letter or by electronic means of communication at least 42 days prior to the day of the relevant meeting. Shareholders who wish to exercise the rights attached to their shares in respect of a shareholders’ meeting are required to register for such meeting. Shareholders may attend a meeting in person, vote by proxy (via an independent third party) or grant a power of attorney to a third party to attend the meeting and vote on their behalf. Details on registration for meetings, attendance and proxy voting will be included in the notice convening the relevant meeting.

Pursuant to Dutch law, the record date for the exercise of voting rights and rights relating to shareholders’ meetings is set at the 28th day prior to the day of the relevant meeting. Shareholders registered on such date are entitled to attend the meeting and to exercise the other shareholder rights (at the relevant meeting) notwithstanding any subsequent sale of their shares after the record date.

In accordance with the Articles of Association and Dutch law, requests from shareholders for items to be included on the agenda will generally be honored, subject to the company’s rights to refuse to include the requested agenda item under Dutch law, provided that such requests are made in writing at least 60 days before a General Meeting of Shareholders to the Board of Management and the Supervisory Board by shareholders representing at least 1% of the company’s outstanding capital or, according to the official price list of Euronext Amsterdam, representing a value of at least EUR 50 million. Written requests may be submitted electronically and shall comply with the procedure stipulated by the Board of Management, which procedure is posted on the company’s website.

Pursuant to Dutch law, shareholders requesting an item to be included on the agenda of a meeting have an obligation to disclose their full economic interest (i.e. long position and short position) to the company. The company has the obligation to publish such disclosures on its website.

Main powers of the General Meeting of Shareholders

The main powers of the General Meeting of Shareholders are:

  • to appoint, suspend and dismiss members of the Board of Management and the Supervisory Board;
  • to adopt remuneration policies for the Board of Management and the Supervisory Board, determine the remuneration of the individual members of the Supervisory Board and to approve long-term incentive (equity-based) plans for the Board of Management;
  • to adopt the annual accounts, to declare dividends and to discharge the Board of Management and the Supervisory Board from any liability in respect of the performance of their respective duties for the previous financial year;
  • to appoint the company’s external auditor;
  • to adopt amendments to the Articles of Association and proposals to dissolve or liquidate the company;
  • to issue shares or rights to shares;
  • to restrict or exclude pre-emptive rights of shareholders and to repurchase or cancel outstanding shares; and
  • in accordance with Dutch law, to approve decisions of the Board of Management that are so far-reaching that they would greatly change the identity or nature of the company or the business.

The company applies principle 4.1 of the Dutch Corporate Governance Code within the framework of the Articles of Association and Dutch law and in the manner described in this corporate governance report. All issued and outstanding shares carry voting rights and each share confers the right to cast one vote in a shareholders’ meeting. Pursuant to Dutch law, no votes may be cast at a General Meeting of Shareholders in respect of shares which are held by the company. There are no special statutory rights attached to the shares of the company and no restrictions on the voting rights of the company’s shares exist. Subject to certain exceptions provided by Dutch law and/or the Articles of Association, resolutions of the General Meeting of Shareholders are passed by an absolute majority of votes cast and do not require a quorum.

Share capital; issue and repurchase of (rights to) shares

The authorized share capital of the company amounts to EUR 800 million, divided into 2 billion common shares with a nominal value of 20 eurocents each and 2 billion preference shares also with a nominal value of 20 eurocents each. On December 31, 2019, the issued share capital amounted to EUR 179,346,744.20, divided into 896,733,721 common shares and no preference shares. All shares are fully paid-up. There are currently no limitations, either under Dutch law or the Articles of Association, to the transfer of the common shares.

Only Euroclear shares are traded on Euronext Amsterdam. Only New York Registry Shares are traded on the New York Stock Exchange. Pursuant to Section 10:138(2) of the Dutch Civil Code, the laws of the State of New York are applicable to the proprietary regime with respect to the New York Registry Shares, which proprietary regime includes the requirements for a transfer of, or the creation of an in rem right in, such New York Registry Shares. Euroclear shares and New York Registry Shares may be exchanged for each other.

As per December 31, 2019, approximately 93% of the common shares were held through the system of Euroclear Nederland (Euroclear shares) and approximately 7% of the common shares were represented by New York Registry Shares issued in the name of approximately 952 holders of record, including Cede & Co. Cede & Co which acts as nominee for The Depository Trust Company holding the shares (indirectly) for individual investors as beneficiaries. Deutsche Bank Trust Company Americas is Philips’ New York transfer agent, registrar and dividend disbursing agent. Since certain shares are held by brokers and other nominees, these numbers may not be representative of the actual number of United States beneficial holders or the number of New York Registry Shares beneficially held by US residents.

At the 2019 Annual General Meeting of Shareholders, it was resolved to authorize the Board of Management, subject to the approval of the Supervisory Board, to issue shares or to grant rights to acquire shares in the company as well as to restrict or exclude the pre-emption right accruing to shareholders up to and including November 8, 2020. This authorization is limited to a maximum of 10% of the number of shares issued as of May 9, 2019.

In addition, at the 2019 Annual General Meeting of Shareholders, it was resolved to authorize the Board of Management, subject to the approval of the Supervisory Board, to acquire shares in the company within the limits of the Articles of Association and within a certain price range up to and including November 8, 2020. The maximum number of shares the company may hold will not exceed 10% of the issued share capital as of May 9, 2019. The number of shares may be increased by 10% of the issued capital as of that same date in connection with the execution of share repurchase programs for capital reduction programs.

9.6Risk management approach

Risk management and control forms an integral part of the Philips business planning and performance review cycle. The company’s risk management policy and framework are designed to provide reasonable assurance that its strategic and operational objectives are met, that legal requirements are complied with, and that the integrity of the company’s financial reporting and its related disclosures is safeguarded. Please refer to Risk management for a more detailed description of Philips’ approach to risk management (including Internal Control over Financial Reporting), risk categories and factors, and certain specific risks that have been identified.

With respect to financial reporting, a structured self-assessment and monitoring process is used company-wide to assess, document, review and monitor compliance with Internal Control over Financial Reporting. On the basis of the outcome of this process, the Board of Management confirms that: (i) the management report (within the meaning of section 2:391 of the Dutch Civil Code) provides sufficient insights into any failings in the effectiveness of the internal risk management and control systems; (ii) such systems provide a reasonable level of assurance that the financial reporting does not contain any material inaccuracies; (iii) based on the current state of affairs, it is justified that the financial reporting is prepared on a going concern basis; and (iv) the management report states those material risks and uncertainties that are relevant to the expected continuity of the company for a period of 12 months after the preparation of the report. The financial statements fairly represent the financial condition and result of operations of the company and provide the required disclosures.

In view of the above, the Board of Management believes that it is in compliance with best practice 1.4.2 of the Dutch Corporate Governance Code. It should be noted that the above does not imply that the internal risk management and control systems provide certainty as to the realization of operational and financial business objectives, nor can they prevent all misstatements, inaccuracies, errors, fraud or non- compliances with rules and regulations. The above statement on internal control should not be construed as a statement in response to the requirements of section 404 of the US Sarbanes-Oxley Act. The statement as to compliance with section 404 is set forth in . Management’s report on internal control

9.7Annual financial statements and external audit

The annual financial statements are prepared by the Board of Management and reviewed by the Supervisory Board upon the advice of its Audit Committee, taking into account the report of the external auditor. Upon approval by the Supervisory Board, the accounts are signed by all members of both the Board of Management and the Supervisory Board and are published together with the opinion of the external auditor. The Board of Management is responsible, under the supervision of the Supervisory Board, for the quality and completeness of such publicly disclosed financial reports. The annual financial statements are presented for discussion and adoption at the Annual General Meeting of Shareholders, to be convened subsequently.

The external auditor is appointed by the General Meeting of Shareholders in accordance with the Articles of Association. Philips’ current external auditor, Ernst & Young Accountants LLP, was appointed by the General Meeting of Shareholders held on May 7, 2015, for a term of four years starting January 1, 2016 and was re-appointed at the Annual General Meeting of Shareholders held on May 9, 2019 for a term of three years starting January 1, 2020.

Dutch law requires the separation of audit and non-audit services, meaning the company’s external auditor is not allowed to provide non-audit services. This is reflected in the Auditor Policy, which is published on the company’s website. The policy is also in line with (and in some ways stricter than) applicable US rules, under which the appointed external auditor must be independent from the company both in fact and appearance.

The Auditor Policy specifies certain audit services and audit-related services (also known as assurance services) that will or may be provided by the external auditor, and includes rules for the pre-approval by the Audit Committee of such services. Audit services must be pre-approved on the basis of the annual audit services engagement agreed with the External Auditor. Proposed audit-related services may be pre-approved at the beginning of the year by the Audit Committee (annual pre-approval) or may be pre-approved during the year by the Audit Committee in respect of a particular engagement (specific pre-approval). The annual pre-approval is based on a detailed, itemized list of services to be provided, which is designed to ensure that there is no management discretion in determining whether a service has been approved, and to ensure that the Audit Committee is informed of each of the services it is pre-approving. Unless pre-approval with respect to a specific service has been given at the beginning of the year, each proposed service requires specific pre-approval during the year. Any annually pre-approved services where the fee for the engagement is expected to exceed pre-approved cost levels or budgeted amounts will also require specific pre-approval. The term of any annual pre-approval is 12 months from the date of the pre-approval unless the Audit Committee states otherwise. During 2019, there were no services provided to the Company by the external auditor which were not pre-approved by the Audit Committee.

9.8Stichting Preferente Aandelen Philips

Stichting Preferente Aandelen Philips, a Foundation (stichting) organized under Dutch law, has been granted the right to acquire preference shares the Royal Philips, as stated in the company’s Articles of Association. In addition, the Foundation has the right to file a petition with the Enterprise Chamber of the Amsterdam Court of Appeal to commence an inquiry procedure within the meaning of section 2:344 Dutch Civil Code.

The object of the Foundation is to represent the interests of Royal Philips, the enterprises maintained by the company and its affiliated companies within the company’s group, in such a way that the interests of the company, these enterprises and all parties involved with them are safeguarded as effectively as possible, and that they are afforded maximum protection against influences which, in conflict with those interests, may undermine the autonomy and identity of Philips and those enterprises, and also to do anything related to the above ends or conducive to them. This object includes the protection of Philips against (an attempt at) an unsolicited takeover or other attempt to exert (de facto) control of the company. The arrangement will allow Philips to determine its position in relation to the relevant third party (or parties) and its (their) plans, to seek alternatives and to defend the company’s interests and those of its stakeholders.

The mere notification that the Foundation exercises its right to acquire preference shares will result in such shares being effectively issued. The Foundation may exercise this right for as many preference shares as there are common shares in the company outstanding at that time. No preference shares have been issued as of December 31, 2019.

The members of the self-electing Board of the Foundation are Messrs J.M. Hessels, F.J.G.M. Cremers and P.N. Wakkie. No Philips Supervisory Board or Board of Management members or Philips officers are represented on the board of the Foundation.

Other than the arrangements made with the Foundation referred to above, the company does not have any measures which exclusively or almost exclusively have the purpose of defending against unsolicited public offers for shares in the capital of the company. It should be noted that the Board of Management and the Supervisory Board remain under all circumstances authorized to exercise all powers vested in them to promote the interests of Philips.

The company has issued certain corporate bonds, the provisions of which contain a ‘Change of Control Triggering Event’ or a ‘Change of Control Put Event’. Upon the occurrence of such events, the company might be required to offer to redeem or purchase any outstanding bonds at certain pre-determined prices. Please also refer to note 18 Debt.

9.9Investor Relations

Philips is continuously focused on maintaining strong and open relations with its shareholders. In addition to communication with its shareholders at shareholders’ meetings, the company may discuss its financial results during conference calls, which are broadly accessible. The company also publishes annual, semi-annual and quarterly reports and press releases, and informs investors via its website.

From time to time the company communicates with investors and analysts via roadshows, broker conferences and a Capital Markets Day, which are announced in advance on the company’s website. The purpose of these engagements is to further inform the market of the results, strategy and decisions made, as well as to receive feedback from shareholders. It is the company’s policy to post presentations to investors and analysts on its website. Philips applies recommendation 4.2.3 of the Dutch Corporate Governance Code, which it does not view (in line with market practice) as extending to less important analyst meetings and presentations.

Furthermore, Philips engages in bilateral communications with investors and analysts. These communications take place either at the initiative of the company or at the initiative of investors/analysts. The company is generally represented by its Investor Relations department during these interactions, however, on a limited number of occasions the Investor Relations department is accompanied by one or more members of the senior management. The subject matter of the bilateral communications ranges from individual queries from investors/analysts to more elaborate discussions following disclosures that the company has made, such as its annual and quarterly reports. Philips complies with applicable rules and regulations on fair and non-selective disclosure and equal treatment of shareholders.

9.10Major shareholders

The Dutch Act on Financial Supervision imposes an obligation on persons holding certain interests to disclose (inter alia) percentage holdings in the capital and/or voting rights in the company when such holdings reach, exceed or fall below 3, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 40, 50, 60, 75 and 95 percent (as a result of an acquisition or disposal by a person, or as a result of a change in the company’s total number of voting rights or capital issued). Certain derivatives (settled in kind or in cash) are also taken into account when calculating the capital interest. The statutory obligation to disclose capital interest relates not only to gross long positions, but also to gross short positions. Required disclosures must be made to the Netherlands Authority for the Financial Markets (AFM) without delay. The AFM then notifies the company of such disclosures and includes them in a register, which is published on the AFM’s website. Furthermore, an obligation to disclose (net) short positions is set out in the EU Regulation on Short Selling.

The AFM register shows the following notifications of substantial holdings and/or voting rights at or above the 3% threshold: BlackRock, Inc.: substantial holding of 5.03% and 6.19% of the voting rights (January 5, 2017); Wellington Management Group LLP: 6.58 % of the voting rights (October 1, 2019); Capital Research and Management Company / Capital Group International Inc.: 5.00 % of the voting rights (November 19, 2019).

9.11Corporate information

The company began as a limited partnership with the name Philips & Co in Eindhoven, the Netherlands, in 1891, and was converted into the company with limited liability N.V. Philips’ Gloeilampenfabrieken on September 11, 1912. The company’s name was changed to Philips Electronics N.V. on May 6, 1994, to Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V. on April 1, 1998, and to Koninklijke Philips N.V. on May 15, 2013.

The majority of the shares in Royal Philips are held through the system maintained by the Dutch Central Securities Depository (Euroclear Nederland). In the past, Philips has also issued (physical) bearer share certificates ("Share Certificates"). A limited number of Share Certificates have not been surrendered yet, although the holders of Share Certificates are still entitled to a corresponding number of shares in Royal Philips. It is noted that, as a result of Dutch legislation that became effective per July 2019, the relevant shares will be registered in the name of Royal Philips by operation of law per January 1, 2021. Owners of Share Certificates will continue to be entitled to a corresponding number of shares, but may not exercise the rights attached to such shares until they surrender their Share Certificates. Owners of Share Certificates may come forward to do so and to receive a corresponding number of shares until January 1, 2026 at the latest. As per January 2, 2026, entitlements attached to the Share Certificates not surrendered, will expire by operation of law. For more information, please contact the Investor Relations department by email (investor.relations@philips.com) or telephone (+31-20-59 77222).

The statutory seat of the company is Eindhoven, the Netherlands, and the statutory list of all subsidiaries and affiliated companies, prepared in accordance with the relevant legal requirements (Dutch Civil Code, Book 2, Sections 379 and 414), forms part of the notes to the consolidated financial statements and is deposited at the office of the Commercial Register in Eindhoven, the Netherlands (file no. 17001910). The executive offices of the company are located at the Philips Center, Amstelplein 2, 1096 BC Amsterdam, the Netherlands, telephone +31-20-59 77777.

The Board of Management and the Supervisory Board are of the opinion that the principles and best practice provisions of the Dutch Corporate Governance Code that are addressed to the boards, are being applied. The full text of the Dutch Corporate Governance Code can be found on the website of the Monitoring Commission Corporate Governance Code (www.commissiecorporategovernance.nl).

10Group financial statements

Introduction

This section of the Annual Report contains the audited consolidated financial statements including the notes thereon that have been prepared in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) as endorsed by the European Union (EU) and with the statutory provisions of Part 9, Book 2 of the Dutch Civil Code.

All standards and interpretations issued by the International Accounting Standards Board (IASB) and the IFRS Interpretations Committee effective 2019 have been endorsed by the EU, consequently, the accounting policies applied by Koninklijke Philips N.V. (Royal Philips) also comply with IFRS as issued by the IASB.

This section ‘Group financial statements’ and the section 'Company financial statements' together contain the statutory financial statements of the company. These statements are subject to adoption by the company’s shareholders at the upcoming 2020 Annual General Meeting of Shareholders.

The following sections and chapters:

form the management report within the meaning of section 2:391 of the Dutch Civil Code (and related Decrees).

The sections Strategy and Businesses, Financial performance and Societal impact provide an extensive analysis of the developments during the financial year 2019 and the results. These sections also provide information on the business outlook, investments, financing, personnel and research and development.

For ‘Additional information’ within the meaning of section 2:392 of the Dutch Civil Code, please refer to Independent auditor’s report and the Appropriation of profits.

Please refer to Forward-looking statements and other information for more information about forward-looking statements, third-party market share data, fair value information, and revisions and reclassifications.

The Board of Management of Royal Philips hereby declares that, to the best of our knowledge, the Group financial statements and Company financial statements give a true and fair view of the assets, liabilities, financial position and profit or loss of the company and the undertakings included in the consolidation taken as a whole and that the management report referred to above gives a true and fair view concerning the position as per the balance sheet date, the development and performance of the business during the financial year of the company and the undertakings included in the consolidation taken as a whole, together with a description of the principal risks that they face.

Board of Management
Frans van Houten
Abhijit Bhattacharya
Marnix van Ginneken

February 25, 2020


10.1Management’s report on internal control

Management’s report on internal control over financial reporting pursuant to section 404 of the US Sarbanes-Oxley Act

The Board of Management of Koninklijke Philips N.V. (Royal Philips) is responsible for establishing and maintaining an adequate system of internal control over financial reporting (as such term is defined in Rule 13a15 (f) under the US Securities Exchange Act). Internal control over financial reporting is a process to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of our financial reporting for external purposes in accordance with IFRS as issued by the IASB.

Internal control over financial reporting includes maintaining records that, in reasonable detail, accurately and fairly reflect our transactions; providing reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary for preparation of our financial statements; providing reasonable assurance that receipts and expenditures of company assets are made in accordance with management authorization; and providing reasonable assurance that unauthorized acquisition, use or disposition of company assets that could have a material effect on our financial statements would be prevented or detected on a timely basis. Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting is not intended to provide absolute assurance that a misstatement of our financial statements would be prevented or detected. Also, projections of any evaluation of the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting to future periods are subject to the risk that the controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.

The Board of Management conducted an assessment of Royal Philips' internal control over financial reporting based on the “Internal Control Integrated Framework (2013)” established by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO).

Based on the Board of Management’s assessment of the effectiveness of Royal Philips' internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2019, it has concluded that, as of December 31, 2019, Royal Philips' internal control over Group financial reporting is considered effective.

The effectiveness of the Royal Philips' internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2019, as included in this section Group financial statements, has been audited by Ernst & Young Accountants LLP, an independent registered public accounting firm, as stated in their report which follows hereafter.

Board of Management
Frans van Houten
Abhijit Bhattacharya
Marnix van Ginneken

February 25, 2020

10.1.1Changes in internal control over financial reporting

There were no changes in our internal control over financial reporting during 2019 that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

10.2Report of the independent auditor

Management’s report on internal control over financial reporting is set out in Management’s report on internal control. The report set out in section Independent auditor’s report on internal control over financial reporting, is provided in compliance with standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board in the US and includes an opinion on the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting as at December 31, 2019, based on COSO criteria.

Ernst & Young Accountants LLP has also issued a report on the 2019 consolidated financial statements and the company financial statements, in accordance with Dutch law, including the Dutch standards on Auditing, of Koninklijke Philips N.V., which is set out in Independent auditor’s report.

Ernst & Young Accountants LLP has also issued a report on the consolidated financial statements 2018 and 2019 in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board in the US, which will be included in the Annual Report on Form 20-F expected to be filed with the US Securities and Exchange Commission on February 25, 2020.

10.3Independent auditor’s report on internal control over financial reporting

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

To: The Supervisory Board and Shareholders of Koninklijke Philips N.V.

Opinion on Internal Control over Financial Reporting

We have audited Koninklijke Philips N.V.’s internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2019, based on criteria established in Internal Control — Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (2013 framework) (the COSO criteria). In our opinion, Koninklijke Philips N.V. (the Company) maintained, in all material respects, effective internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2019, based on the COSO criteria.

We also have audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States) (PCAOB), the consolidated balance sheets of the Company as of December 31, 2019 and 2018, the related consolidated statements of income, comprehensive income, cash flows and changes in equity for each of the three years in the period ended December 31, 2019, and the related notes and our report dated February 25, 2020 expressed an unqualified opinion thereon.

Basis for Opinion

The Company’s management is responsible for maintaining effective internal control over financial reporting, and for its assessment of the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting included in the accompanying section ‘Management’s report on internal control’, of this Annual Report. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the Company’s internal control over financial reporting based on our audit. We are a public accounting firm registered with the PCAOB and are required to be independent with respect to the Company in accordance with the U.S. federal securities laws and the applicable rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission and the PCAOB.

We conducted our audit in accordance with the standards of the PCAOB. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether effective internal control over financial reporting was maintained in all material respects.

Our audit included obtaining an understanding of internal control over financial reporting, assessing the risk that a material weakness exists, testing and evaluating the design and operating effectiveness of internal control based on the assessed risk, and performing such other procedures as we considered necessary in the circumstances. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion.


Definition and Limitations of Internal Control over Financial Reporting

A company’s internal control over financial reporting is a process designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. A company’s internal control over financial reporting includes those policies and procedures that (1) pertain to the maintenance of records that, in reasonable detail, accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of the assets of the company; (2) provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, and that receipts and expenditures of the company are being made only in accordance with authorizations of management and directors of the company; and (3) provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use, or disposition of the company’s assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements.

Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.

Ernst & Young Accountants LLP

Amsterdam, the Netherlands
February 25, 2020

10.4Consolidated statements of income

Philips Group

Consolidated statements of income

in millions of EUR

For the years ended December 31

2017

2018

2019

Sales6

17,780

18,121

19,482

Cost of sales

(9,600)

(9,568)

(10,607)

Gross margin

8,181

8,554

8,875

Selling expenses

(4,398)

(4,500)

(4,682)

General and administrative expenses

(577)

(631)

(631)

Research and development expenses

(1,764)

(1,759)

(1,884)

Other business income6

152

88

155

Other business expenses6

(76)

(33)

(188)

Income from operations6

1,517

1,719

1,644

Financial income7

126

51

117

Financial expenses7

(263)

(264)

(233)

Investments in associates, net of income taxes

(4)

(2)

1

Income before taxes

1,377

1,503

1,529

Income tax expense8

(349)

(193)

(337)

Income from continuing operations

1,028

1,310

1,192

Discontinued operations, net of income taxes3

843

(213)

(19)

Net income

1,870

1,097

1,173

Attribution of net income

Net income attributable to Koninklijke Philips N.V. shareholders

1,657

1,090

1,167

Net income attributable to non-controlling interests

214

7

5

Philips Group

Earnings per common share attributable to Koninklijke Philips N.V. shareholders

in EUR unless otherwise stated

For the years ended December 31

2017

2018

2019

Basic earnings per common share in EUR

Income from continuing operations attributable to shareholders

1.10

1.41

1.31

Net income attributable to shareholders

1.78

1.18

1.29

Diluted earnings per common share in EUR

Income from continuing operations attributable to shareholders

1.08

1.39

1.30

Net income attributable to shareholders

1.75

1.16

1.28

Amounts may not add up due to rounding.

10.5Consolidated statements of comprehensive income

Philips Group

Consolidated statements of comprehensive income

in millions of EUR

for the year ended December 31

2017

2018

2019

Net income for the period

1,870

1,097

1,173

Pensions and other-post employment plans:20

Remeasurement

102

(8)

30

Income tax effect on remeasurements8

(78)

(19)

3

Financial assets fair value through OCI:

Net current-period change, before tax

(147)

82

Reclassification directly into retained earnings

(5)

Total of items that will not be reclassified to Income Statement

25

(179)

114

Currency translation differences:

Net current period change, before tax

(1,177)

383

218

Income tax effect on net current-period change8

39

(29)

-

Reclassification adjustment for (gain) loss realized

4

Reclassification adjustment for (gain) loss realized, in discontinued operations

191

(6)

16

Available-for-sale financial assets:13

Net current period change, before tax

(66)

Income tax effect on net current-period change8

(1)

Reclassification adjustment for loss (gain) realized

1

Cash flow hedges:

Net current-period change, before tax

33

(13)

(53)

Income tax effect on net current-period change8

(3)

11

6

Reclassification adjustment for loss (gain) realized

(17)

(31)

33

Total of items that are or may be reclassified to Income Statement

(1,000)

315

225

Other comprehensive income for the period

(975)

136

340

Total comprehensive income for the period

895

1,233

1,512

Total comprehensive income attributable to:

Shareholders of Koninklijke Philips N.V.

805

1,225

1,507

Non-controlling interests

90

8

5

Amounts may not add up due to rounding.

10.6Consolidated balance sheets

Amounts may not add up due to rounding.

Philips Group

Consolidated balance sheets

in millions of EUR unless otherwise stated

As of December 31

2018

2019

Non-current assets

Property, plant and equipment1)102

1,712

2,866

Goodwill112

8,503

8,654

Intangible assets excluding goodwill122

3,589

3,466

Non-current receivables16

162

178

Investments in associates5

244

233

Other non-current financial assets13

360

248

Non-current derivative financial assets28

1

1

Deferred tax assets8

1,828

1,865

Other non-current assets14

47

47

Total non-current assets

16,447

17,557

Current assets

Inventories15

2,674

2,773

Other current financial assets13

436

1

Other current assets14

469

476

Current derivative financial assets28

36

38

Income tax receivable8

147

177

Current receivables2516

4,035

4,554

Assets classified as held for sale3

87

13

Cash and cash equivalents29

1,688

1,425

Total current assets

9,572

9,459

Total assets

26,019

27,016

Equity17

Equity

12,088

12,597

Common shares

185

179

Reserves

548

652

Other

11,355

11,766

Non-controlling interests17

29

28

Group equity

12,117

12,625

Non-current liabilities

Long-term debt1)18

3,427

4,939

Non-current derivative financial liabilities28

114

124

Long-term provisions2019

1,788

1,603

Deferred tax liabilities8

152

143

Non-current contract liabilities22

226

348

Non-current tax liabilities2)8

181

186

Other non-current liabilities22

72

71

Total non-current liabilities

5,959

7,413

Current liabilities

Short-term debt1)18

1,394

508

Current derivative financial liabilities28

176

67

Income tax payable8

118

100

Accounts payable25

2,303

2,089

Accrued liabilities21

1,537

1,632

Current contract liabilities22

1,303

1,170

Short-term provisions2019

363

556

Liabilities directly associated with assets held for sale3

12

-

Other current liabilities22

737

856

Total current liabilities

7,943

6,978

Total liabilities and group equity

26,019

27,016

10.7Consolidated statements of cash flows

Amounts may not add up due to rounding.

Philips Group

Consolidated statements of cash flows1)

in millions of EUR

For the years ended December 31

2017

2018

2019

Cash flows from operating activities

Net income (loss)

1,870

1,097

1,173

Results of discontinued operations, net of income tax

(843)

213

19

Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by (used for) operating activities:

Depreciation, amortization, and impairment of fixed assets

1,025

1,089

1,402

Impairment of goodwill and other non-current financial assets

15

1

97

Share-based compensation

116

97

98

Net gain on sale of assets

(107)

(71)

(77)

Interest income

(40)

(31)

(27)

Interest expense on debt, borrowings, and other liabilities

186

165

174

Income taxes

349

193

337

Investments in associates, net of income taxes

2

6

Decrease (increase) in working capital

101

(179)

(819)

Decrease (increase) in receivables and other current assets

64

(97)

(274)

Decrease (Increase) in inventories

(144)

(394)

(175)

Increase (decrease) in accounts payable, accrued and other current liabilities

181

311

(369)

Decrease (increase) in non-current receivables, other assets and other liabilities

(358)

(49)

122

Increase (decrease) in provisions19

(252)

(271)

27

Other items

261

(59)

(5)

Interest paid

(215)

(170)

(172)

Interest received

40

35

27

Dividends received from investments in associates

6

20

12

Income taxes paid

(284)

(301)

(363)

Net cash provided by (used for) operating activities

1,870

1,780

2,031

Cash flows from investing activities

Net capital expenditures

(685)

(796)

(978)

Purchase of intangible assets

(106)

(123)

(156)

Expenditures on development assets

(333)

(298)

(339)

Capital expenditures on property, plant and equipment

(420)

(422)

(518)

Proceeds from sales of property, plant and equipment3

175

46

35

Net proceeds from (cash used for) derivatives and current financial assets23

(198)

(175)

385

Purchase of other non-current financial assets23

(42)

(34)

(63)

Proceeds from other non-current financial assets23

6

77

162

Purchase of businesses, net of cash acquired4

(2,344)

(628)

(255)

Net proceeds from sale of interests in businesses, net of cash disposed of3

64

70

146

Net cash provided by (used for) for investing activities

(3,199)

(1,486)

(603)

Cash flows from financing activities

Proceeds from issuance (payments on) short-term debt18

12

34

23

Principal payments on short-term portion of long-term debt18

(1,332)

(1,161)

(761)

Proceeds from issuance of long-term debt18

1,115

1,287

847

Re-issuance of treasury shares17

227

94

58

Purchase of treasury shares17

(642)

(1,042)

(1,376)

Proceeds from sale of Signify (Philips Lighting) shares5

1,065

Transaction costs paid for sale of Signify (Philips Lighting) shares5

(5)

Dividends paid to shareholders of Koninklijke Philips N.V.17

(384)

(401)

(453)

Dividends paid to shareholders of non-controlling interests

(2)

(3)

(2)

Net cash provided by (used for) financing activities

55

(1,192)

(1,665)

Net cash provided by (used for) continuing operations

(1,274)

(898)

(237)

Net cash provided by (used for) discontinued operations3

1,063

647

(25)

Net cash provided by (used for) continuing and discontinued operations

(211)

(251)

(262)

Effect of changes in exchange rates on cash and cash equivalents

(184)

-

(2)

Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the year

2,334

1,939

1,688

Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the period

1,939

1,688

1,425

10.8Consolidated statements of changes in equity

Philips Group

Consolidated statements of changes in equity

in millions of EUR

For the year ended December 31

Common share

Currency translation differences1)

Fair value through OCI2)

Cash flow hedges

Capital in excess of par value

Retained earnings

Treasury shares at cost

Total shareholders' equity

Non-controlling interests

Group equity

reserves

other

Balance as of Jan. 1, 2017

186

1,234

36

10

3,083

8,178

(181)

12,546

907

13,453

Total comprehensive income (loss)

(823)

(66)

12

1,681

805

90

895

Dividend distributed

2

356

(742)

(384)

(94)

(478)

Sale of shares of Philips Lighting (now Signify)

(19)

346

327

712

1,039

Deconsolidation Philips Lighting (now Signify)

(66)

54

(12)

(1,590)

(1,602)

Purchase of treasury shares

(318)

(318)

(318)

Re-issuance of treasury shares

(205)

3

334

133

133

Forward contracts

(1,018)

(61)

(1,079)

(1,079)

Share call options

95

(255)

(160)

(160)

Share-based compensation plans

151

151

151

Income tax share-based compensation plans

(8)

(8)

(8)

Balance as of Dec. 31, 2017

188

392

(30)

23

3,311

8,596

(481)

11,999

24

12,023

IFRS 9 and 15 adjustment

(4)

(25)

(29)

(29)

Balance as of Jan. 1, 2018

188

392

(34)

23

3,311

8,571

(481)

11,970

24

11,993

Total comprehensive income (loss)

347

(147)

(33)

1,058

1,225

8

1,233

Dividend distributed

2

336

(738)

(400)

(3)

(403)

Purchase of treasury shares

(514)

(514)

(514)

Re-issuance of treasury shares

(276)

(4)

341

61

61

Forward contracts

124

(443)

(319)

(319)

Share call options

34

(85)

(51)

(51)

Cancellation of treasury shares

(5)

(779)

783

Share-based compensation plans

107

107

107

Income tax share-based compensation plans

11

11

11

Balance as of Dec. 31, 2018

185

739

(181)

(10)

3,487

8,266

(399)

12,088

29

12,117

IFRS 16 adjustment3)

(33)

(33)

(33)

Balance as of Jan. 1, 2019

185

739

(181)

(10)

3,487

8,232

(399)

12,055

29

12,084

Total comprehensive income (loss)

239

82

(13)

1,200

1,507

5

1,512

Dividend distributed

2

319

(775)

(453)

(2)

(456)

Minority Buy-out

(3)

(3)

(3)

(6)

Transfer of gain on disposal of equity investments at FVTOCI to retained earnings

(204)

204

Purchase of treasury shares

(621)

(621)

(621)

Re-issuance of treasury shares

(246)

11

266

31

31

Forward contracts

706

(706)

Share call options

28

(58)

(30)

(30)

Cancellation of treasury shares

(8)

(1,308)

1,316

Share-based compensation plans

101

101

101

Income tax share-based compensation plans

10

10

10

Balance as of Dec. 31, 2019

179

978

(303)

(24)

3,671

8,296

(201)

12,597

28

12,625

Amounts may not add up due to rounding.

10.9Notes

Notes to the Consolidated financial statements of the Philips Group

1Significant accounting policies

The Consolidated financial statements in the Group financial statements section have been prepared in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) as endorsed by the European Union (EU) and with the statutory provisions of Part 9, Book 2 of the Dutch Civil Code.

All standards and interpretations issued by the International Accounting Standards Board (IASB) and the IFRS Interpretations Committee effective 2019 have been endorsed by the EU; consequently, the accounting policies applied by Philips also comply with IFRS as issued by the IASB. These accounting policies have been applied by group entities.

The Consolidated financial statements have been prepared under the historical cost convention, unless otherwise indicated.

The Consolidated financial statements are presented in euros, which is the presentation currency. Due to rounding, amounts may not add up precisely to the totals provided.

Use of estimates

The preparation of the Consolidated financial statements in conformity with IFRS requires management to make judgments, estimates and assumptions that affect the application of accounting policies and the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, income and expenses. These estimates inherently contain a degree of uncertainty. Actual results may differ from these estimates under different assumptions or conditions.

In the process of applying the accounting policies, management has made estimates and assumptions concerning the future and other key sources of estimation uncertainty at the reporting date that have a significant risk of causing a material adjustment to the reported amounts of assets and liabilities within the next financial year, as well as to the disclosure of contingent liabilities at the date of the Consolidated financial statements, and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. The company evaluates these estimates and judgments on an ongoing basis and bases the estimates on historical experience, current and expected future outcomes, third-party evaluations and various other assumptions that Philips believes are reasonable under the circumstances. Existing circumstances and assumptions about future developments may change due to circumstances beyond the company’s control and are reflected in the assumptions if and when they occur. The results of these estimates form the basis for making judgments about the carrying value of assets and liabilities as well as identifying and assessing the accounting treatment with respect to commitments and contingencies. The company revises material estimates if changes occur in the circumstances or if there is new information or experience on which an estimate was or can be based.

The areas where the most significant judgments and estimates are made are goodwill, deferred tax asset recoverability, impairments, classification and measurement of financial instruments, the accounting for an arrangement containing a lease, the assessment whether a lease option to extend or cancel a lease in which the company is a lessee is reasonably certain to be exercised or not, revenue recognition, tax risks and other contingencies, assessment of control, classification of assets and liabilities held for sale and the presentation of items of profit and loss and cash flows as continuing or discontinued, as well as when determining the fair values of acquired identifiable intangible assets, contingent considerations and investments based on an assessment of future cash flows (e.g. earn out arrangements as part of acquisitions). For further discussion of these significant judgements and estimates, reference is made to the respective accounting policies and notes within these Consolidated financial statements that relate to the above topics.

Further judgment is applied when analyzing impairments of goodwill and intangible assets not yet ready for use that are performed annually and whenever a triggering event has occurred to determine whether the carrying value exceeds the recoverable amount. These analyses are generally based on estimates of discounted future cash flows. Furthermore, the company applies judgment when actuarial assumptions are established to anticipate future events that are used in calculating post-employment benefit expenses and liabilities. These factors include assumptions with respect to interest rates, rates of increase in healthcare costs, rates of future compensation increases, turnover rates and life expectancy.

Changes in presentation from the prior year

Accounting policies have been applied consistently for all periods presented in these consolidated financial statements, except for the items mentioned below and the impact of the adoption of IFRS 16 Leases, for which reference is made to the section New standards and interpretations of this note. In addition, certain prior-year amounts have been reclassified to conform to the current year presentation.

Change in Segment reporting

From January 1, 2019, Philips realigned the composition of its reporting segments. The most notable changes are the shifts of the Sleep & Respiratory Care business from the Personal Health segment to the renamed Connected Care segment and most of the Healthcare Informatics business from the renamed Connected Care segment to the Diagnosis & Treatment segment. The new segment structure had no significant impact on the headroom or lead to goodwill impairment as disclosed in Goodwill.

Consequential changes to comparative segment disclosures have been processed in Receivables and Provisions. The 2018 and 2017 segment results have been reclassified according to the revised reporting structure. Segment information can be found in Information by segment and main country.

Change in presentation of non-current portion of income tax payable due to IFRIC 23

Following the adoption of IFRIC 23 Uncertainty over Income Tax Treatments, the company has changed the presentation of uncertain tax positions in the Consolidated balance sheets. The Other tax liability included in the line Other non-current liabilities is reclassified to the new Non-current tax liabilities line item on the face of the Consolidated balance sheets. For the comparative figures per December 31, 2018 an amount of EUR 181 million is reclassified from Other non-current liabilities to Income tax payable (under non-current liabilities). Further reference is made to Income taxes.

Specific choices within IFRS

In certain instances, IFRS allows alternative accounting treatments for measurement and/or disclosure. Philips has adopted one of the treatments as appropriate to the circumstances of the company. The most important of these alternative treatments are mentioned below.

Tangible and intangible fixed assets

Under IFRS, an entity shall choose either the cost model or the revaluation model as its accounting model for tangible and intangible fixed assets. In this respect, items of property, plant and equipment are measured at cost less accumulated depreciation and accumulated impairment losses. The useful lives and residual values are evaluated annually. Furthermore, the company chose to apply the cost model, meaning that costs relating to product development, the development and purchase of software for internal use and other intangible assets are capitalized and subsequently amortized over the estimated useful life. Further information on Tangible and Intangible fixed assets can be found in Property, plant and equipment and in Intangible assets excluding goodwill, respectively.

Employee benefit accounting

IFRS does not specify how an entity should present its service costs related to pensions and net interest on the net defined-benefit liability (asset) in the Consolidated statements of income. With regards to these elements, the company presents service costs in Income from operations and the net interest expenses related to defined-benefit plans in Financial expense.

Further information on employee benefit accounting can be found in Post-employment benefits.

Cash flow statements

Under IFRS, an entity shall report cash flows from operating activities using either the direct method (whereby major classes of gross cash receipts and gross cash payments are disclosed) or the indirect method (whereby profit or loss is adjusted for the effects of transactions of a non-cash nature, any deferrals or accruals of past or future operating cash receipts or payments, and items of income or expense associated with investing or financing cash flows). In this respect, the company chose to prepare the cash flow statements using the indirect method.

Furthermore, interest cash flows are presented in cash flows from operating activities rather than in cash flows from financing or investing activities, because they enter into the determination of profit or loss. The company chose to present dividends paid to shareholders of Koninklijke Philips N.V. as a component of cash flows from financing activities, rather than to present such dividends as cash flows from operating activities, which is an allowed alternative under IFRS.

Consolidated statements of cash flows can be found in Consolidated statements of cash flows.

Policies that are more critical in nature

Revenue recognition

Revenue from the sale of goods in the normal course of business is recognized at a point in time when the performance obligation is satisfied and it is based on the amount of the transaction price that is allocated to the performance obligation. The transaction price is the amount of the consideration to which the company expects to be entitled in exchange for transferring the promised goods to the customer. The consideration expected by the company may include fixed and/or variable amounts which can be impacted by sales returns, trade discounts and volume rebates. The company adjusts the consideration for the time value of money for the contracts where no explicit interest rate is mentioned if the period between the transfer of the promised goods or services to the customer and payment by the customer exceeds six months. Revenue for the sale of goods is recognized when control of the asset is transferred to the buyer and only when it is highly probable that a significant reversal of revenue will not occur when uncertainties related to a variable consideration are resolved.

Transfer of control varies depending on the individual terms of the contract of sale. For consumer-type products in the segment Personal Health businesses, control is transferred when the product is shipped and delivered to the customer and title and risk have passed to the customer (depending on the delivery conditions) and acceptance of the product has been obtained. Examples of delivery conditions are ‘Free on Board point of delivery’ and ‘Costs, Insurance Paid point of delivery’, where the point of delivery may be the shipping warehouse or any other point of destination as agreed in the contract with the customer and where control is transferred to the customer.

Revenues from transactions relating to distinct goods or services are accounted for separately based on their relative stand-alone selling prices. The stand-alone selling price is defined as the price that would be charged for the goods or service in a separate transaction under similar conditions to similar customers, which within the company is mainly the Country Target Price (CTP). The transaction price determined (taking into account variable considerations) is allocated to performance obligations based on relative stand-alone selling prices. These transactions mainly occur in the segments Diagnosis & Treatment businesses and Connected Care businesses and include arrangements that require subsequent installation and training activities in order to make distinct goods operable for the customer. As such, the related installation and training activities are part of equipment sales rather than separate performance obligations. Revenue is recognized when the performance obligation is satisfied, i.e. when the installation has been completed and the equipment is ready to be used by the customer in the way contractually agreed.

Revenues are recorded net of sales taxes. A variable consideration is recognized to the extent that it is highly probable that a significant reversal in the amount of cumulative revenue recognized will not occur when the uncertainty associated with the variable consideration is subsequently resolved. Such assessment is performed on each reporting date to check whether it is constrained. For products for which a right of return exists during a defined period, revenue recognition is determined based on the historical pattern of actual returns, or in cases where such information is not available revenue recognition is postponed until the return period has lapsed. Return policies are typically based on customary return arrangements in local markets.

A provision is recognized for assurance-type product warranty at the time of revenue recognition and reflects the estimated costs of replacement and free-of-charge services that will be incurred by the company with respect to the products sold. For certain products, the customer has the option to purchase the warranty separately, which is considered a separate performance obligation on top of the assurance-type product warranty. For such warranties which provide distinct service, revenue recognition occurs on a straight-line basis over the extended warranty contract period.

In the case of loss under a sales agreement, the loss is recognized immediately.

Expenses incurred for shipping and handling of internal movements of goods are recorded as cost of sales. Shipping and handling related to sales to third parties are recorded as selling expenses. When shipping and handling are part of a project and billed to the customer, then the related expenses are recorded as cost of sales. Shipping and handling billed to customers are distinct and separate performance obligations and recognized as revenues. Expenses incurred for sales commissions that are considered incremental to the contracts are recognized immediately in the Consolidated statements of income as selling expenses as a practical expedient under IFRS 15 Revenue from Contracts with Customers.

Revenue from services is recognized over a period of time as the company transfers control of the services to the customer which is demonstrated by the customer simultaneously receiving and consuming the benefits provided by the company. The amount of revenues is measured by reference to the progress made towards complete satisfaction of the performance obligation, which in general is evenly over time. Service revenue related to repair and maintenance activities for goods sold is recognized ratably over the service period or as services are rendered.

Royalty income from brand license arrangements is recognized based on a right to access the license, which in practice means over the contract period based on a fixed amount or reliable estimate of sales made by a licensee.

Royalty income from intellectual property rights such as technology licenses or patents is recognized based on a right-to-use the license, which in practice means at a point in time based on the contractual terms and substance of the relevant agreement with a licensee. However, revenue related to intellectual property contracts with variable consideration where a constraint in the estimation is identified, is recognized over the contract period and is based on actual or reliably estimated sales made by a licensee.

The company receives payments from customers based on a billing schedule or credit period, as established in our contracts. Credit periods are determined based on standard terms, which vary according to local market conditions. Amounts posted in deferred revenue for which the goods or services have not yet been transferred to the customer and amounts that have either been received or are due, are presented as Contract liabilities in the Consolidated balance sheets.

Income taxes

Income taxes comprise current, non-current and deferred tax. Income tax is recognized in the Consolidated statements of income except to the extent that it relates to items recognized directly within equity or in other comprehensive income. Current tax is the expected taxes payable on the taxable income for the year, using tax rates enacted or substantively enacted at the reporting date, and any adjustment to tax payable in respect of previous years.

Tax liabilities are recognized when it is considered probable that there will be a future outflow of funds to a taxing authority. In such cases, provision is made for the amount that is expected to be settled, where this can be reasonably estimated. This assessment relies on estimates and assumptions and may involve a series of judgments about future events. New information may become available that causes the company to change its judgment regarding the adequacy of existing tax liabilities. Such changes to tax liabilities will impact the income tax expense in the period during which such a determination is made.

Deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized, using the consolidated balance sheets method, for the expected tax consequences of temporary differences between the carrying amounts of assets and liabilities and the amounts used for taxation purposes. Deferred tax is not recognized for the following temporary differences: the initial recognition of goodwill; the initial recognition of assets and liabilities in a transaction that is not a business combination and that affects neither accounting nor taxable profit; and differences relating to investments in subsidiaries, joint ventures and associates where the reversal of the respective temporary difference can be controlled by the company and it is probable that it will not reverse in the foreseeable future. Deferred taxes are measured at the tax rates that are expected to be applied to temporary differences when they reverse, based on the laws that have been enacted or substantively enacted by the reporting date. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are offset if there is a legally enforceable right to offset current tax liabilities and assets, and they relate to income taxes levied by the same tax authority on the same taxable entity or on different taxable entities, but the company intends to settle current tax liabilities and assets on a net basis or their tax assets and liabilities will be realized simultaneously.

A deferred tax asset is recognized for unused tax losses, tax credits and deductible temporary differences to the extent that it is probable that there will be future taxable profits against which they can be utilized. The ultimate realization of deferred tax assets is dependent upon the generation of future taxable income in the countries where the deferred tax assets originated and during the periods when the deferred tax assets become deductible. Management considers the scheduled reversal of deferred tax liabilities, projected future taxable income and tax planning strategies in making this assessment.

Deferred tax liabilities for withholding taxes are recognized for subsidiaries in situations where the income is to be paid out as dividend in the foreseeable future and for undistributed earnings of unconsolidated companies to the extent that these withholding taxes are not expected to be refundable or deductible. Changes in tax rates and tax laws are reflected in the period when the change was enacted or substantively enacted by the reporting date.

Any subsequent adjustment to a tax asset or liability that originated in discontinued operations and for which no specific arrangements were made at the time of divestment, due to a change in the tax base or its measurement, is allocated to discontinued operations (i.e. backwards tracing). Examples are a tax rate change or change in retained assets or liabilities directly relating to the discontinued operation. Any subsequent change to the recognition of deferred tax assets is allocated to the component in which the taxable gain is or will be recognized. The above principles are applied to the extent the ‘discontinued operations’ are sufficiently separable from continuing operations.

Further information on income tax can be found in Income taxes.

Provisions

Provisions are recognized if, as a result of a past event, the company has a present legal or constructive obligation, the amount can be estimated reliably, and it is probable that an outflow of economic benefits will be required to settle the obligation. Provisions are measured at the present value of the expenditures expected to be required to settle the obligation using a pre-tax discount rate that reflects current market assessments of the time value of money. The increase in the provision due to passage of time is recognized as interest expense. The accounting and presentation for some of the company’s provisions is as follows:

  • Product warranty – A provision for assurance-type product warranty is recognized when the underlying products or services are sold. The provision is based on historical warranty data and a weighing of possible outcomes against their associated probabilities.
  • Environmental provisions – Measurement of liabilities associated with environmental obligations is based on current legal and constructive requirements. Liabilities and expected insurance recoveries, if any, are recorded separately. The carrying amount of environmental liabilities is regularly reviewed and adjusted for new facts and changes in law.
  • Restructuring-related provisions – The provision for restructuring mainly relates to the estimated costs of initiated restructurings, the most significant of which have been approved by the Executive Committee, and which generally involve the realignment of certain parts of the industrial and commercial organization. When such restructurings require discontinuance and/or closure of lines of activities, the anticipated costs of closure or discontinuance are included in restructuring provisions. A liability is recognized for those costs only when the company has a detailed formal plan for the restructuring and has raised a valid expectation with those affected that it will carry out the restructuring by starting to implement that plan or announcing its main features to those affected by it. Before a provision is established, the company recognizes any impairment loss on the assets associated with the restructuring.
  • Litigation provisions – In relation to legal claim provisions and settlements, the relevant balances are transferred to Other liabilities at the point when the amount and timing of cash outflows are no longer uncertain. Settlements which are agreed for amounts in excess of existing provisions are reflected as increases in Other liabilities.

Further information on provisions can be found in Provisions.

Goodwill

The measurement of goodwill at initial recognition is described in the Basis of consolidation note. Goodwill is subsequently measured at cost less accumulated impairment losses. Further information on goodwill can also be found in Goodwill.

Intangible assets other than goodwill

Acquired finite-lived intangible assets are amortized using the straight-line method over their estimated useful life. The useful lives are evaluated annually. Intangible assets are initially capitalized at cost, with the exception of intangible assets acquired as part of a business combination, which are capitalized at their acquisition date fair value.

The company expenses all research costs as incurred. Expenditure on development activities, whereby research findings are applied to a plan or design for the production of new or substantially improved products and processes, is capitalized as an intangible asset if the product or process is technically and commercially feasible, the company has sufficient resources and the intention to complete development and can measure the attributable expenditure reliably.

The capitalized development expenditure comprises of all directly attributable costs (including the cost of materials and direct labor). Other development expenditures and expenditures on research activities are recognized in the Consolidated statements of income. Capitalized development expenditure is stated at cost less accumulated amortization and impairment losses. Amortization of capitalized development expenditure is charged to the Consolidated statements of income on a straight-line basis over the estimated useful lives of the intangible assets.

Further information on intangible assets other than goodwill can be found in Intangible assets excluding goodwill.

Discontinued operations and non-current assets held for sale

Non-current assets and disposal groups comprising assets and liabilities that are expected to be recovered primarily through sale rather than through continuing use are classified as held for sale.

Non-current assets classified as held for sale and the assets of a disposal group classified as held for sale are presented separately from the other assets in the Consolidated balance sheets. The liabilities of a disposal group classified as held for sale are presented separately from other liabilities in the Consolidated balance sheets.

A discontinued operation is a component of an entity that has either been disposed of or is classified as held for sale, and represents a separate major line of business or geographical area of operations; or is a part of a single coordinated plan to dispose of a separate major line of business or geographical area of operations; or is a subsidiary acquired exclusively with a view to sell.

If a discontinued operation is sold in stages as part of a single coordinated plan until it is completely sold, then the Investment in associate that is recognized upon sale of a portion that results in Philips having significant influence in the operation (rather than control) is continued to be treated as discontinued operation provided that the held for sale criteria are met.

Non-current assets held for sale and discontinued operations are carried at the lower of carrying amount or fair value less cost of disposal. Any gain or loss from disposal, together with the results of these operations until the date of disposal, is reported separately as discontinued operations. The financial information of discontinued operations is excluded from the respective captions in the Consolidated financial statements and related notes for all periods presented. Comparatives in the Consolidated balance sheets are not represented when a non-current asset or disposal group is classified as held for sale. Comparatives are represented for presentation of discontinued operations in the Consolidated statements of cash flows and Consolidated statements of income.

Adjustments in the current period to amounts previously presented in discontinued operations that are directly related to the disposal of a discontinued operation in a prior period, and for which no specific arrangements were made at the time of divestment, are classified separately in discontinued operations. Circumstances to which these adjustments may relate include resolution of uncertainties that arise from the terms of the disposal transaction, such as the resolution of purchase price adjustments and indemnifications, resolution of uncertainties that arise from and are directly related to the operations of the component before its disposal, such as environmental and assurance-type product warranty obligations retained by the company, and the settlement of employee benefit plan obligations provided that the settlement is directly related to the disposal transaction.

Further information on discontinued operations and non-current assets held for sale can be found in Discontinued operations and assets classified as held for sale.

Impairment
Impairment of goodwill and intangible assets not yet ready for use

Goodwill and intangible assets not yet ready for use are not amortized but are tested for impairment annually and whenever impairment indicators require. In case of goodwill and intangible assets not yet ready for use, either internal or external sources of information are considered indicators that an asset or a CGU may be impaired. In most cases the company identified its cash-generating units for goodwill at one level below that of an operating segment. Cash flows at this level are substantially independent from other cash flows and this is the lowest level at which goodwill is monitored by the Executive Committee. An impairment loss is recognized in the Consolidated statements of income whenever and to the extent that the carrying amount of a cash-generating unit exceeds the unit’s recoverable amount, whichever is the greater, its value in use or its fair value less cost of disposal. Value in use is measured as the present value of future cash flows expected to be generated by the asset. Fair value less cost of disposal is measured as the amount obtained from the sale of an asset in an arm’s length transaction, less costs of disposal.

Further information on impairment of goodwill and intangible assets not yet ready for use can be found in Goodwill and Intangible assets excluding goodwill respectively.

Impairment of non-financial assets other than goodwill, intangible assets not yet ready for use, inventories and deferred tax assets

Non-financial assets other than goodwill, intangible assets not yet ready for use, inventories and deferred tax assets are reviewed for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of an asset may not be recoverable. Recoverability of assets to be held and used is assessed by a comparison of the carrying amount of an asset with the greater of its value in use and fair value less cost of disposal. Value in use is measured as the present value of future cash flows expected to be generated by the asset. Fair value less cost of disposal is measured as the amount obtained from a sale of an asset in an arm’s length transaction, less costs of disposal. If the carrying amount of an asset is deemed not recoverable, an impairment charge is recognized in the amount by which the carrying amount of the asset exceeds the recoverable amount. The review for impairment is carried out at the level where cash flows occur that are independent of other cash flows.

Impairment losses recognized in prior periods are assessed at each reporting date for any indications that the loss has decreased or no longer exists. An impairment loss is reversed if and to the extent that there has been a change in the estimates used to determine the recoverable amount. The loss is reversed only to the extent that the asset’s carrying amount does not exceed the carrying amount that would have been determined, net of depreciation or amortization, if no impairment loss had been recognized. Reversals of impairment are recognized in the Consolidated statements of income.

Impairment of financial assets

The company recognizes an allowance for expected credit losses (ECLs) for trade receivables, contract assets, lease receivables, debt investments carried at fair value through Other comprehensive income (FVTOCI) and amortized cost. ECLs are based on the difference between the contractual cash flows due in accordance with the contract and all the cash flows that the company expects to receive, discounted at an approximation of the original effective interest rate.

ECLs are recognized in two stages. For credit risk exposures for which there has not been a significant increase in credit risk since initial recognition, ECLs are provided for credit losses that result from default events that are possible within the next 12 months (12-month ECLs). The company considers a financial asset to be in default when the counterparty is unlikely to pay its credit obligations to the company in full or when the financial asset is past due. For those credit exposures for which there has been a significant increase in credit risk since initial recognition, a loss allowance is required for credit losses expected over the remaining life of the exposure, irrespective of the timing of the default (lifetime ECLs). When determining whether the credit risk of a financial asset has increased significantly since initial recognition, the company considers reasonable and supportable information that is relevant and available without undue cost or effort. This includes both quantitative and qualitative information and analysis, based on the company's historical experience and informed credit assessment and including forward-looking information, such as forecast economic conditions that affect the ability of the customers to settle the receivables.

For all trade receivables, contract assets and lease receivables, the company applies the IFRS 9 simplified approach to measuring ECLs, which uses the lifetime ECL allowance. To measure the ECLs on trade receivables, contract assets and lease receivables, the company takes into account credit-risk concentration, collective debt risk based on average historical losses, specific circumstances such as serious adverse economic conditions in a specific country or region, and other forward-looking information. Trade receivables, contract assets and lease receivables are written off when there is no reasonable expectation of recovery of the asset, for example because of bankruptcy or other forms of receivership.

Further information on financial assets can be found in Other financial assets.

Other policies

Basis of consolidation

The Consolidated financial statements comprise the financial statements of Koninklijke Philips N.V. and all subsidiaries that the company controls, i.e. when it is exposed or has rights to variable returns from its involvement with the investee and has the ability to affect those returns through its power over the investee. Generally, there is a presumption that a majority of voting rights results in control. To support this presumption and in cases where Philips has less than a majority of the voting or similar rights of an investee, Philips considers all relevant facts and circumstances in assessing whether it has power over an investee, including the contractual arrangement(s) with the other vote holders of the investee, rights arising from other contractual arrangements and the company’s voting rights and potential voting rights. Subsidiaries are fully consolidated from the date that control commences until the date that control ceases. All intercompany balances and transactions have been eliminated in the Consolidated financial statements. Unrealized losses are eliminated in the same way as unrealized gains, but only to the extent that there is no evidence of impairment.

Loss of control

Upon loss of control, the company derecognizes the assets and liabilities of the subsidiary, any non-controlling interests and the other components of equity related to the subsidiary. Any surplus or deficit arising from the loss of control is recognized in the Consolidated statements of income. If the company retains any interest in the previous subsidiary, such interest is measured at fair value at the date the control is lost. Subsequently it is accounted for as either an equity-accounted investee (associate) or as a financial asset, depending on the level of influence retained. Further information on loss of control can be found in Discontinued operations and assets classified as held for sale.

Business combinations

Business combinations are accounted for using the acquisition method. Under the acquisition method, the identifiable assets acquired, liabilities assumed and any non-controlling interest in the acquiree are recognized at the acquisition date, which is the date on which control is transferred to the company.

The company measures goodwill at the acquisition date as:

  • the fair value of the consideration transferred; plus
  • the recognized amount of any non-controlling interest in the acquiree; plus
  • if the business combination is achieved in stages, the fair value of the existing equity interest in the acquiree; less
  • the net recognized amount (generally fair value) of the identifiable assets acquired and liabilities assumed.

Costs related to the acquisition, other than those associated with the issue of debt or equity securities, that the company incurs are expensed as incurred.

Any contingent consideration payable is recognized at fair value at the acquisition date and initially is presented in Long-term provisions. When the timing and amount of the consideration become more certain, it is reclassified to Accrued liabilities. If the contingent consideration that meets the definition of a financial instrument is classified as equity, it is not remeasured and settlement is accounted for within equity. Otherwise, subsequent changes to the fair value of the contingent consideration are recognized in the Consolidated statements of income.

Non-controlling interests are measured on the basis of their proportionate share of the acquiree’s identifiable net assets at the date of acquisition.

Further information on business combinations can be found in Acquisitions and divestments.

Acquisitions of and adjustments to non-controlling interests

Acquisitions of non-controlling interests are accounted for as transactions with owners in their capacity as owners and therefore no goodwill is recognized. Adjustments to non-controlling interests arising from transactions that do not involve the loss of control are based on a proportionate amount of the net assets of the subsidiary.

Investments in associates (equity-accounted investees)

Associates are all entities over which the company has significant influence, but no control. Significant influence is presumed with a shareholding of between 20% and 50% of the voting rights or when the company has board representation through which it is able to exercise significant influence. Investments in associates are accounted for using the equity method of accounting and are initially recognized at cost. The carrying amount of an investment includes the carrying amount of goodwill identified on acquisition. An impairment loss on such investment is allocated to the investment as a whole.

The company’s share of the net income of these companies is included in Investments in associates, net of income taxes, in the Consolidated statements of income, after adjustments to align the accounting policies with those of the company, from the date that significant influence commences until the date that significant influence ceases. Dilution gains and losses arising from investments in associates are recognized in the Consolidated statements of income as part of Investments in associates, net of income taxes. When the company’s share of losses exceeds its interest in an associate, the carrying amount of that interest (including any long-term loans) is reduced to zero and recognition of further losses is discontinued except to the extent that the company has incurred legal or constructive obligations or made payments on behalf of the associate. Unrealized gains on transactions between the company and its associates are eliminated to the extent of the company’s interest in the associates. Unrealized losses are also eliminated unless the transaction provides evidence of an impairment of the asset transferred. Remeasurement differences of an equity stake resulting from gaining control over an investee that was previously recorded as an associate are recorded under Investments in associates.

Further information on investments in associates can be found in Interests in entities.

Foreign currencies
Foreign currency transactions

The financial statements of all group entities are measured using the currency of the primary economic environment in which the entity operates (functional currency). The euro (EUR) is the functional currency of the company and the presentation currency of the Group financial statements. Foreign currency transactions are translated into the functional currency using the exchange rates prevailing at the dates of the transactions or the valuation in cases where items are remeasured. Foreign exchange gains and losses resulting from the settlement of such transactions and from the translation at year-end exchange rates of monetary assets and liabilities denominated in foreign currencies are recognized in the Consolidated statements of income, except when deferred in Other comprehensive income as qualifying cash flow hedges and qualifying net investment hedges.

Foreign currency differences arising from translations are recognized in the Consolidated statements of income, except for equity investments measured at fair value through OCI which are recognized in Other comprehensive income. If there is an impairment which results in foreign currency differences being recognized, these differences are reclassified from Other comprehensive income to the Consolidated statements of income.

All foreign exchange differences are presented as part of Cost of sales, with the exception of tax items and financial income and expense, which are recognized in the same line item as they relate to in the Consolidated statements of income.

Non-monetary assets and liabilities denominated in foreign currencies that are measured at fair value are retranslated to the functional currency using the exchange rate at the date the fair value was determined. Non-monetary items in a foreign currency that are measured based on historical cost are translated using the exchange rate at the transaction date.

Foreign operations

The assets and liabilities of foreign operations, including goodwill and fair value adjustments arising on acquisition, are translated to euros at the exchange rates prevailing at the reporting date. The income and expenses of foreign operations are translated to euros at the exchange rates prevailing at the dates of the transactions.

Foreign currency differences arising upon translation of foreign operations into euros are recognized in Other comprehensive income, and presented as part of Currency translation differences in Equity. However, if the operation is a non-wholly-owned subsidiary, the relevant proportionate share of the translation difference is allocated to Non-controlling interests.

When a foreign operation is disposed of such that control, significant influence or joint control is lost, the cumulative amount in the Currency translation differences related to the foreign operation is reclassified to the Consolidated statements of income as part of the gain or loss on disposal. When the company disposes of only part of its interest in a subsidiary that includes a foreign operation while retaining control, the respective proportion of the cumulative amount is reattributed to Non-controlling interests. When the company disposes of only part of its investment in an associate or joint venture that includes a foreign operation while retaining significant influence or joint control, the relevant proportion of the cumulative amount is reclassified to the Consolidated statements of income.

Financial instruments
Non-derivative financial assets
Recognition and initial measurement

Non-derivative financial assets are recognized when the company becomes a party to the contractual provisions of the instrument. Purchases and sales of financial assets in the normal course of business are accounted for at the trade date. Dividend and interest income are recognized when earned. Gains or losses, if any, are recorded in Financial income and expense. Non-derivative financial assets are derecognized when the rights to receive cash flows from the asset have expired or the company has transferred its rights to receive cash flows from the asset.

At initial recognition, the company measures a financial asset at its fair value plus, in the case of a financial asset not measured at fair value through profit or loss (FVTPL), transaction costs that are directly attributable to the acquisition of the financial asset. Transaction costs of financial assets carried at FVTPL are expensed in the Consolidated statements of income.

Classification and subsequent measurement

The company classifies its non-derivative financial assets in the following measurement categories:

  • those that are measured subsequently at fair value (either through OCI (FVTOCI) or profit or loss (FVTPL);
  • those that are measured at amortized cost.

In assessing the classification, the company considers the business model for managing the financial assets and the contractual terms of the cash flows.

For assets measured at fair value, gains and losses will be recorded in either the Consolidated statements of income or in Other comprehensive income (OCI). For investments in equity instruments that are not held for trading, this will depend on whether the company has made an irrevocable election at the time of initial recognition to account for the equity investment at FVTOCI. For investments in these equity instruments, the company does not subsequently reclassify between FVTOCI and FVTPL. For debt investments, assets are reclassified between FVTOCI, FVTPL and amortized cost only when its business model for managing those assets changes.

Non-derivative financial assets comprise cash and cash equivalents, receivables and other financial assets.

Cash and cash equivalents

Cash and cash equivalents include all cash balances, certain money market funds and short-term highly liquid investments with an original maturity of three months or less that are readily convertible into known amounts of cash. Further information on cash and cash equivalents can be found in Cash flow statement supplementary information.

Receivables

Receivable balances that are held to collect are subsequently measured at amortized cost and are subject to impairment as explained in the impairment section of this note. Receivables that are held to collect and sell are subsequently measured at FVTOCI and are also subject to impairment. The company derecognizes receivables on entering into factoring transactions if the company has transferred substantially all risks and rewards or if the company does not retain control over those receivables. Further information on receivables can be found in Receivables.

Other (non-)current financial assets

Other (non-)current financial assets include both debt instruments and equity instruments.

Debt instruments include those subsequently carried at amortized cost, those carried at FVTPL and those carried at FVTOCI. Classification depends on the company’s business model for managing the asset and the cash flow characteristics of the asset.

Debt instruments that are held for collection of contractual cash flows, where those cash flows represent solely payments of principal and interest, are measured at amortized cost and are subject to impairment. Interest income from these financial assets is included in Financial income using the effective interest rate method. Financial assets with embedded derivatives are considered in their entirety when determining whether their cash flows are solely payment of principal and interest.

Debt instruments that are held for collection of contractual cash flows and for selling the financial assets, where the assets’ cash flows represent solely payments of principal and interest, are measured at FVTOCI and are subject to impairment. Movements in the carrying amounts are taken through OCI, except for the recognition of impairment gains or losses, interest revenue and foreign exchange gains and losses, which are recognized in the Consolidated statements of income. When the financial asset is derecognized, the cumulative gain or loss previously recognized in OCI is reclassified from equity to the Consolidated statements of income. Interest income from these financial assets is included in Financial income using the effective interest rate method.

Debt instruments that do not meet the criteria for amortized cost or FVTOCI are measured at FVTPL. A gain or loss on a debt investment that is subsequently measured at FVTPL is recognized in the Consolidated statements of income in the period in which it arises.

Equity investments are subsequently measured at fair value. Equity instruments that are held for trading are measured at FVTPL. For equity instruments that are not held for trading, the company makes an irrevocable election at the time of initial recognition whether to account for the equity investment at FVTPL or FVTOCI. Where management has elected to present fair value gains and losses on equity investments in OCI, there is no subsequent reclassification of fair value gains and losses to the Consolidated statements of income following the derecognition of the investment. Dividends from such investments continue to be recognized in the Consolidated statements of income when the company’s right to receive payments is established.

Further information on other (non-)current financial assets can be found in Other financial assets

Debt and other financial liabilities

Debt and other financial liabilities, excluding derivative financial liabilities and provisions, are initially measured at fair value and, in the case of debt and payables, net of directly attributable transaction costs. Debt and other financial liabilities are subsequently measured at amortized cost using the effective interest rate. Amortized cost is calculated by taking into account any discount or premium on acquisition and fees or costs that are an integral part of the effective interest rate.

Debt and other financial liabilities are derecognized when the obligation under the liability is discharged, cancelled or has expired.

Further information on debt and other financial liabilities can be found in Debt.

Equity

Common shares are classified as equity. Incremental costs directly attributable to the issuance of shares are recognized as a deduction from equity. Where the company purchases the company’s equity share capital (treasury shares), the consideration paid, including any directly attributable incremental transaction costs (net of income taxes), is deducted from equity attributable to the company’s equity holders until the shares are cancelled or reissued. Where such ordinary shares are subsequently reissued, any consideration received, net of any directly attributable incremental transaction costs and the related income tax effects, is included in equity attributable to the company’s equity holders.

Call options on own shares are treated as equity instruments.

Dividends are recognized as a liability in the period in which they are declared and approved by shareholders. The income tax consequences of dividends are recognized when a liability to pay the dividend is recognized.

Further information on equity can be found in Equity.

Derivative financial instruments, including hedge accounting

The company uses derivative financial instruments principally to manage its foreign currency risks and, to a more limited extent, interest rate and commodity price risks. All derivative financial instruments are accounted for at the trade date and classified as current or non-current assets or liabilities based on the maturity date or the early termination date. The company measures all derivative financial instruments at fair value that is derived from the market prices of the instruments, calculated on the basis of the present value of the estimated future cash flows based on observable interest yield curves, basis spread, credit spreads and foreign exchange rates, or derived from option pricing models, as appropriate. Gains or losses arising from changes in fair value of derivatives are recognized in the Consolidated statements of income, except for derivatives that are highly effective and qualify for cash flow or net investment hedge accounting.

Changes in the fair value of foreign exchange forward contracts attributable to forward points and changes in the time value of the option contracts are deferred in the cash flow hedges reserve within equity. The deferred amounts are recognized in the Consolidated statements of income against the related hedged transaction when it occurs.

Changes in the fair value of a derivative that is highly effective and that is designated and qualifies as a cash flow hedge are recorded in OCI until the Consolidated statements of income are affected by the variability in cash flows of the designated hedged item. To the extent that the hedge is ineffective, changes in the fair value are recognized in the Consolidated statements of income.

The company formally assesses, both at the hedge’s inception and on an ongoing basis, whether the derivatives that are used in hedging transactions are highly effective in offsetting changes in fair values or cash flows of hedged items. When it is established that a derivative is not highly effective as a hedge or that it has ceased to be a highly effective hedge, the company discontinues hedge accounting prospectively. When hedge accounting is discontinued because it is expected that a forecasted transaction will not occur, the company continues to carry the derivative on the Consolidated balance sheets at its fair value, and gains and losses that were accumulated in OCI are recognized immediately in the same line item as they relate to in the Consolidated statements of income.

Foreign currency differences arising upon retranslation of financial instruments designated as a hedge of a net investment in a foreign operation are recognized directly in the currency translation differences reserve through OCI, to the extent that the hedge is effective. To the extent that the hedge is ineffective, such differences are recognized in the Consolidated statements of income.

Offsetting and master netting agreements

The company presents financial assets and financial liabilities on a gross basis as separate line items in the Consolidated balance sheets.

Master netting agreements may be entered into when the company undertakes a number of financial instrument transactions with a single counterparty. Such an agreement provides for a net settlement of all financial instruments covered by the agreement in the event of default or certain termination events associated with any of the transactions. A master netting agreement may create a right to offset that becomes enforceable and affects the realization or settlement of individual financial assets and financial liabilities only following a specified termination event. However, if this contractual right is subject to certain limitations then it does not necessarily provide a basis for offsetting, unless both of the offsetting criteria are met, i.e. there is a legally enforceable right and an intention to settle net or simultaneously.

Property, plant and equipment

The costs of property, plant and equipment comprise all directly attributable costs (including the cost of material and direct labor).

Depreciation is generally calculated using the straight-line method over the useful life of the asset. Gains and losses on the sale of property, plant and equipment are included in Other business income. Costs related to repair and maintenance activities are expensed in the period in which they are incurred unless leading to an extension of the original lifetime or capacity.

Leasehold improvements are amortized using the straight-line method over the shorter of the lease term or the estimated useful life of the asset.

Further information on property, plant and equipment can be found in Property, plant and equipment.

Leases

The company determines whether an arrangement constitutes or contains a lease at inception, which is based on the substance of the arrangement at the inception of the lease. The arrangement constitutes or contains a lease if fulfillment is dependent on the use of a specific asset and the arrangement conveys a right to use the asset, even if that asset is not explicitly specified in the arrangement.

Company as a lessee

Until the financial year ended December 31, 2018, leases of property, plant and equipment were classified as either finance or operating leases. Payments made under operating leases (net of any incentives received from the lessor) were charged to profit or loss on a straight-line basis over the period of the lease.

From January 1, 2019, leases are recognized as a right-of-use asset and a corresponding liability at the date at which the leased asset is available for use by the company. The right-of-use asset is depreciated over the shorter of the asset's useful life and the lease term on a straight-line basis.

Assets and liabilities arising from a lease are initially measured on a present value basis. Lease liabilities include the net present value of the following lease payments:

  • fixed payments (including in-substance fixed payments) less any lease incentives receivable;
  • variable lease payments that are based on an index or a rate;
  • amounts expected to be payable by the lessee under residual value guarantees;
  • the exercise price of a purchase option if the lessee is reasonably certain to exercise that option;
  • payments of penalties for terminating the lease, if the lease term reflects the lessee exercising that option.

The lease payments are discounted using the interest rate implicit in the lease. If that rate cannot be determined, the lessee’s incremental borrowing rate at the lease commencement date is used, which is based on an assessment of interest rates the company would have to pay to borrow funds, including the consideration of factors such as the nature of the asset and location, collateral, market terms and conditions, as applicable. After the commencement date, the amount of lease liabilities is increased to reflect the accretion of interest and reduced for the lease payments made.

Each lease payment is allocated between the liability and finance charges. The interest element of the finance cost is charged to the Consolidated statements of income over the lease period so as to produce a constant periodic rate of interest on the remaining balance of the liability for each period. In addition, the carrying amount of lease liabilities is remeasured if there is a modification, a change in the lease term, a change in the in-substance fixed lease payments or a change in the assessment to purchase the underlying asset.

Right-of-use assets are measured at cost comprising the following:

  • the amount of the initial measurement of lease liability;
  • any lease payments made at or before the commencement date less any lease incentives received;
  • any initial direct costs;
  • restoration costs.
The right-of-use assets are subsequently accounted for using principles for property, plant and equipment. Payments associated with short-term leases and leases of low-value assets are recognized on a straight-line basis as an expense in the Consolidated statements of income. Short-term leases are leases with a lease term of 12 months or less. Low-value assets comprise IT-equipment and small items of office furniture considered to be of low value (i.e. less than EUR 5,000).

The company determines the lease term as the non-cancellable term of the lease, together with any periods covered by an option to extend the lease if it is reasonably certain to be exercised, or any periods covered by an option to terminate the lease, if it is reasonably certain not to be exercised. The company applies judgement in evaluating whether it is reasonably certain to exercise the option to renew. That is, it considers all relevant factors that create an economic incentive for it to exercise the renewal.

The company leases various items of real estate, vehicles and other equipment. Rental contracts are typically made for fixed periods but may have extension or termination options.

The related year end disclosures pertaining to leases as lessee under the new standard IFRS 16 have been disclosed in respective notes according to the nature of the reported item. Below are the references with respect to IFRS 16 year-end disclosures as lessee:

Company as a lessor

When the company acts as a lessor, it determines at lease inception whether a lease is a finance lease or an operating lease. Leases in which the company does not transfer substantially all the risks and rewards incidental to ownership of an asset are classified as operating leases. The company recognizes lease payments received under operating leases as income on a straight-line basis over the lease terms in the Statement of income.

The related year end disclosures pertaining to leases as lessor under the new standard IFRS 16 have been disclosed in respective notes according to the nature of the reported item. Below are the references with respect to IFRS 16 year-end disclosures as lessor:

Inventories

Inventories are stated at the lower of cost or net realizable value. The cost of inventories comprises all costs of purchase, costs of conversion and other costs incurred in bringing the inventories to their present location and condition. The costs of conversion of inventories include direct labor and fixed and variable production overheads, taking into account the stage of completion and the normal capacity of production facilities. Costs of idle facility and abnormal waste are expensed. The cost of inventories is determined using the first-in, first-out (FIFO) method. Inventory is reduced for the estimated losses due to obsolescence. This reduction is determined for groups of products based on sales in the recent past and/or expected future demand.

Further information on inventories can be found in Inventories.

Employee benefit accounting

A defined-contribution plan is a post-employment benefit plan under which an entity pays fixed contributions into a separate entity and will have no legal or constructive obligation to pay further amounts. Obligations for contributions to defined-contribution pension plans are recognized as an employee benefit expense in the Consolidated statements of income in the periods during which services are rendered by employees.

A defined-benefit plan is a post-employment benefit plan other than a defined-contribution plan. Plans for which the company has no legal or constructive obligation to pay further amounts, but to which it does pay non-fixed contributions, are also treated as a defined-benefit plan. The net pension asset or liability recognized in the Consolidated balance sheets in respect of defined-benefit post-employment plans is the fair value of plan assets less the present value of the projected defined-benefit obligation at the Consolidated balance sheets date. The defined-benefit obligation is calculated annually by qualified actuaries using the projected unit credit method. Recognized assets are limited to the present value of any reductions in future contributions or any future refunds. The net pension liability is presented as a long-term provision; no distinction is made for the short-term portion.

For the company’s major plans, a full discount rate curve of high-quality corporate bonds is used to determine the defined-benefit obligation. The curves are based on Willis Towers Watson’s rate methodology which uses data of corporate bonds rated AA or equivalent. For the other plans a single-point discount rate is used based on corporate bonds for which there is a deep market and on the plan’s maturity. Plans in countries without a deep corporate bond market use a discount rate based on the local sovereign curve and the plan’s maturity.

Pension costs in respect of defined-benefit post-employment plans primarily represent the increase of the actuarial present value of the obligation for post-employment benefits based on employee service during the year and the interest on the net recognized asset or liability in respect of employee service in previous years.

Remeasurements of the net defined-benefit asset or liability comprise actuarial gains and losses, the return on plan assets (excluding interest) and the effect of the asset ceiling (excluding interest). The company recognizes all remeasurements in Other comprehensive income.

The company recognizes gains and losses on the settlement of a defined-benefit plan when the settlement occurs. The gain or loss on settlement is the difference between the present value of the defined-benefit obligation being settled, as determined on the date of settlement, and the settlement price, including any plan assets transferred and any payments made directly by the company in connection with the settlement. Past service costs arising from the introduction of a change to the benefit payable under a plan or a significant reduction of the number of employees covered by a plan (curtailment) are recognized in full in the Consolidated statements of income.

Further information on post-employment benefit accounting can be found in Post-employment benefits.

Short-term employee benefit obligations are measured on an undiscounted basis and are expensed as the related service is provided. The company recognizes a liability and an expense for bonuses and incentives based on a formula that takes into consideration the profit attributable to the company’s shareholders after certain adjustments.

The company’s net obligation in respect of long-term employee benefits is the amount of future benefit that employees have earned in return for their service in the current and prior periods, such as jubilee entitlements. That benefit is discounted to determine its present value. Remeasurements are recognized in the Consolidated statements of income in the period in which they arise.

Further information on other employee benefits can be found in Provisions in the Other provisions section.

Share-based payment
Equity-settled transactions

The cost of equity-settled transactions is determined by the fair value at the date when the grant is made using an appropriate valuation model, further details of which are given in Share-based compensation.

The grant-date fair value of equity-settled share-based payment awards granted to employees is recognized as personnel expense, with a corresponding increase in equity, over the vesting period of the award. The cumulative expense recognized for equity-settled transactions at each reporting date until the vesting date reflects the extent to which the vesting period has expired and the company’s best estimate of the number of equity instruments that will ultimately vest. The expense or credit in the statement of income for a period represents the movement in cumulative expense recognized at the beginning and end of that period.

Service and non-market performance conditions are not taken into account when determining the grant-date fair value of awards, but the likelihood of the conditions being met is assessed as part of the company’s best estimate of the number of equity instruments that will ultimately vest. Market performance conditions are reflected within the grant-date fair value. No expense is recognized for awards that do not ultimately vest because non-market performance and/or service conditions have not been met.

When an award is cancelled by the entity or by the counterparty, any remaining element of the fair value of the award is expensed immediately through profit or loss. The dilutive effect of outstanding options and shares is reflected as additional share dilution in the computation of diluted earnings per share (further details are given in Earnings per share).

Financial income and expenses

Financial income comprises interest income on funds invested (including financial assets), dividend income, net gains on the disposal of financial assets, net fair value gains on financial assets at FVTPL, net gains on the remeasurement to fair value of any pre-existing interest in an acquiree, and net gains on foreign exchange impacts that are recognized in the Consolidated statements of income.

Interest income is recognized on an accrual basis in the Consolidated statements of income, using the effective interest method. Dividend income is recognized in the Consolidated statements of income on the date that the company’s right to receive payment is established, which in the case of quoted securities is normally the ex-dividend date.

Financial expenses comprise interest expenses on borrowings, unwinding of the discount on provisions and contingent consideration, losses on disposal of financial assets, net fair value losses on financial assets at FVTPL, impairment losses recognized on financial assets (other than trade receivables), net interest expenses related to defined-benefit plans, interest on lease liabilities and net losses on foreign exchange impacts that are recognized in the Consolidated statements of income.

Further information on financial income and expenses can be found in Financial income and expenses.

Government grants

Grants from governments are recognized at their fair value where there is a reasonable assurance that the grant will be received and the company will comply with all attached conditions. Government grants relating to costs are deferred and recognized in the Consolidated statements of income as a reduction of the related costs over the period necessary to match them with the costs that they are intended to compensate. Grants related to assets are deducted from the cost of the asset and presented net in the Consolidated balance sheets.

Financial guarantees

The company recognizes a liability at the fair value of the obligation at the inception of a financial guarantee contract. The guarantee is subsequently measured at the higher of the best estimate of the obligation or the amount initially recognized less, when appropriate, cumulative amortization.

Cash flow statements

Cash flows arising from transactions in a foreign currency are translated into the company’s functional currency using the exchange rate at the date of the cash flow. Cash flows from derivative instruments that are accounted for as cash flow hedges are classified in the same category as the cash flows from the hedged items. Cash flows from other derivative instruments are classified as investing cash flows.

Segment information

Operating segments are components of the company’s business activities about which separate financial information is available that is evaluated regularly by the chief operating decision maker (the Executive Committee of the company). The Executive Committee decides how to allocate resources and assesses performance. Reportable segments comprise the operating segments Diagnosis & Treatment businesses, Connected Care businesses and Personal Health businesses. Additionally, besides these reportable segments, segment Other exists. Segment accounting policies are the same as the accounting policies applied by the company.

Earnings per Share

The company presents basic and diluted earnings per share (EPS) data for its common shares. Basic EPS is calculated by dividing the Net income (loss) attributable to shareholders by the weighted average number of common shares outstanding during the period, adjusted for own shares held. Diluted EPS is determined by adjusting the Net income (loss) attributable to shareholders and the weighted average number of common shares outstanding during the period, adjusted for own shares held, for the effects of all dilutive potential common shares, which comprises forward purchase contracts, restricted shares, performance shares and share options granted to employees.

Further information on earnings per share can be found in Earnings per share.

New standards and interpretations

IFRS accounting standards adopted as from 2019

The company applies, for the first time, IFRS 16 Leases. The impact of the adoption of this new standard and the new accounting policy is disclosed below. Other amendments and interpretations applied for the first time in 2019 did not have a material impact on the consolidated financial statements of the company.

Impact on the financial statements

IFRS 16 supersedes IAS 17 Leases, IFRIC 4 Determining whether an Arrangement contains a Lease, SIC-15 Operating Leases-Incentives and SIC-27 Evaluating the Substance of Transactions Involving the Legal Form of a Lease. The standard sets out the principles for the recognition, measurement, presentation and disclosure of leases and requires lessees to account for all leases under a single on-balance-sheet model.

Lessor accounting under IFRS 16 is substantially unchanged compared to IAS 17. Lessors will continue to classify leases as either operating or finance leases using similar principles as in IAS 17. Therefore, IFRS 16 did not have an impact for leases where the company is the lessor.

The company adopted IFRS 16 using the modified retrospective method of adoption with the date of initial application of January 1, 2019. The company did not restate prior-year financial statements or notes.

Nature of the effect of adoption of IFRS 16

The company has lease contracts for various items of real estate, vehicles and other equipment. Before the adoption of IFRS 16, the company classified each of its leases (as lessee) at the inception date as either a finance lease or an operating lease. A lease was classified as a finance lease if it transferred substantially all of the risks and rewards incidental to ownership of the leased asset to the company otherwise it was classified as an operating lease. Finance leases were capitalized at the commencement of the lease at the inception date fair value of the leased property or, if lower, at the present value of the minimum lease payments. Lease payments were apportioned between interest (recognized as financial expenses) and reduction of the lease liability. In an operating lease, the leased item was not capitalized and the lease payments were recognized as rent expense in the Consolidated statement of income on a straight-line basis over the lease term. Any prepaid rent and accrued rent were recognized under Other current assets and Accrued liabilities respectively. Upon adoption of IFRS 16, the company applied a single recognition and measurement approach for all leases, except for short-term leases and leases of low-value assets. The standard provides specific transition requirements and practical expedients which have been applied by the company.

Leases previously classified as finance leases

The company did not change the initial carrying amounts of recognized assets and liabilities at the date of initial application for leases previously classified as finance leases (i.e. the right-of-use assets and lease liabilities equal the lease assets and liabilities recognized under IAS 17). The requirements of IFRS 16 have been applied to these leases from January 1, 2019.

Leases previously accounted for as operating leases

The company recognized right-of-use assets and lease liabilities for those leases previously classified as operating leases, except for short-term leases and leases of low-value assets. The right-of-use assets for most leases were recognized based on the amount equal to the lease liabilities, adjusted for any related prepaid and accrued lease payments previously recognized. For certain property leases, the right-of- use assets were recognized based on the carrying amount as if the standard had always been applied, apart from the use of incremental borrowing rate at the date of initial application. Lease liabilities were recognized based on the present value of the remaining lease payments, discounted using the incremental borrowing rate at the date of initial application.

Practical expedients applied

In applying IFRS 16 for the first time, the company has used the following practical expedients permitted by the standard:

  • Reliance on previous assessments on whether leases are onerous;
  • Accounting for operating leases with an original lease term or remaining lease term of less than 12 months as at January 1, 2019 as short-term leases;
  • Exclusion of initial direct costs for the measurement of the right-of-use asset at the date of initial application;
  • Use of hindsight in determining the lease term where the contract contains options to extend or terminate the lease;
  • Exclusion of low-value leases (i.e. individually less than EUR 5,000);
  • Not separating lease from non-lease components for car leases.

The company has also elected not to reassess whether a contract is, or contains, a lease at the date of initial application. Instead, for contracts entered into before the transition date, the company relied on its assessment made applying IAS 17 and IFRIC 4 Determining whether an Arrangement contains a Lease.

Adjustments recognized on adoption of IFRS 16

On adoption of IFRS 16, the company recognized lease liabilities in relation to leases which had previously been classified as operating leases under the principles of IAS 17 Leases. These liabilities were measured at the present value of the remaining lease payments, discounted using the lessee’s incremental borrowing rate as of January 1, 2019. The weighted average incremental borrowing rate applied to the lease liabilities on January 1, 2019 was 2.4%.

In addition, the existing finance lease assets and liabilities, determined as per IAS 17 with a carrying value of approximately EUR 330 million each as at December 31, 2018, have been reclassified and added to the right-of-use asset and lease liability determined as per IFRS 16 on January 1, 2019.

The change in accounting policy affected the following items on the balance sheet on January 1, 2019:

Balance sheet impact of IFRS 16 adoption

in millions of EUR

Balance sheet captions

January 1, 2019

IFRS 16

January 1, 2019

Property, plant and equipment

1,712

760

2,472

Other current assets

469

(12)

457

Deferred tax assets

1,828

5

1,833

Shareholders' equity

12,088

(33)

12,055

Long-term debt

3,427

656

4,083

Long-term provisions

1,788

(6)

1,782

Short-term debt

1,394

147

1,541

Accrued liabilities

1,537

(11)

1,526

The lease liabilities as of January 1, 2019 are reconciled to the operating lease commitments as of December 31, 2018 as follows:

Reconciliation of operating lease commitments to lease liabilities

in millions of EUR

Operating lease commitments disclosed as of December 31, 2018

756

Discounted using the lessee’s incremental borrowing rate at the date of initial application

699

Add: finance lease liabilities recognized as at December 31, 2018

330

(Less): short-term leases recognized on a straight-line basis as expense

(17)

Add: lease extensions considered reasonably certain

121

Lease liability recognized as of January 1, 2019

1,133

Of which are:

Current lease liabilities

241

Non-current lease liabilities

892

The impact on opening retained earnings as of January 1, 2019 due to IFRS 16 adoption is as follows:

Retained earnings impact of IFRS 16 adoption

in millions of EUR

Retained earnings as of December 31, 2018

8,266

IFRS 16 adjustments due to modified retrospective approach

Asset retrospective calculation

(38)

Deferred tax asset impact

5

Opening balance Retained earnings as of January 1, 2019

8,233

The costs incurred during the financial year following the IFRS 16 adoption consisted of depreciation amounting to EUR 166 million, interest charges amounting to EUR 20 million and EUR 52 million for short-term and low value leases, compared to EUR 225 million of operating lease expenses booked in financial year 2018. In 2019, operating cash flows increased and financing cash flows decreased by EUR 171 million compared to the previous year as the repayment of the principal portion of the lease liabilities is now classified as cash flows from financing activities, while previously the operating lease payments were classified as cash flows from operating activities.

There is no material impact on basic and diluted EPS.

IFRS accounting standards to be adopted from 2020 onwards

A number of amendments to existing standards have been published and are mandatory for the company beginning on or after January 1, 2020, or later periods, and the company has not early-adopted them. The changes to those standards are not expected to have a material impact on the company’s financial statements.

2Information by segment and main country

Philips Group

Information on income statements

in millions of EUR

2017 - 2019

sales

sales including intercompany

depreciation and amortization1)

Adjusted EBITA2)3)

2019

Diagnosis & Treatment4)

8,485

8,579

(564)

1,078

Connected Care

4,674

4,760

(327)

618

Personal Health

5,854

5,864

(186)

943

Other

469

542

(326)

(76)

Inter-segment eliminations

(263)

Philips Group

19,482

19,482

(1,402)

2,563

2018

Diagnosis & Treatment

7,726

7,825

(349)

872

Connected Care

4,341

4,516

(326)

662

Personal Health

5,524

5,538

(171)

860

Other

530

612

(244)

(28)

Inter-segment eliminations

(369)

Philips Group

18,121

18,121

(1,089)

2,366

2017

Diagnosis & Treatment

7,365

7,445

(301)

747

Connected Care

4,331

4,492

(355)

684

Personal Health

5,685

5,702

(181)

879

Other

400

535

(188)

(157)

Inter-segment eliminations

(393)

Philips Group

17,780

17,780

(1,025)

2,153

As required by IFRS 8 Operating Segments, Philips operating segments are Diagnosis & Treatment businesses, Connected Care businesses and Personal Health businesses, each being responsible for the management of its business worldwide. From January 1, 2019, Philips realigned the composition of its reporting segments. The most notable changes are the shifts of the Sleep & Respiratory Care business from the Personal Health segment to the renamed Connected Care segment and most of the Healthcare Informatics business from the renamed Connected Care segment to the Diagnosis & Treatment segment. The 2018 and 2017 segment results have been reclassified according to the revised reporting structure.

Philips focuses on improving people’s lives through meaningful innovation across the health continuum – from healthy living and prevention to diagnosis, treatment and home care. The Diagnosis & Treatment unites the businesses related to the promise of precision diagnosis and disease pathway selection, and the businesses related to image-guided, minimally invasive treatments. The Connected Care businesses focuses on patient care solutions, advanced analytics and patient and workflow optimization inside and outside the hospital, and aims to unlock synergies from integrating and optimizing patient care pathways, and leveraging provider-payer-patient business models. The Personal Health businesses focuses on healthy living and preventative care.

The Executive Committee of Philips is deemed to be the chief operating decision maker (CODM) for IFRS 8 segment reporting purposes. The key segmental performance measure is Adjusted EBITA*), which Management believes is the most relevant measure to evaluate the results of the segments.

The term Adjusted EBITA*) is used to evaluate the performance of Philips and its segments. EBITA*) represents Income from operations excluding amortization and impairment of acquired intangible assets and impairment of goodwill. Adjusted EBITA*) represents EBITA *)excluding gains or losses from restructuring costs, acquisition-related charges and other items.

Adjusted EBITA*) is not a recognized measure of financial performance under IFRS. Below is a reconciliation of Adjusted EBITA*) to the most directly comparable IFRS measure, Net income, for the years indicated. Net income is not allocated to segments as certain income and expense line items are monitored on a centralized basis, resulting in them being shown on a Philips Group level only.

Philips Group

Reconciliation from net income to Adjusted EBITA1)

In millions of EUR

2017 - 2019

Philips Group

Diagnosis & Treatment

Connected Care

Personal Health

Other

2019

Net Income

1,173

Discontinued operations, net of income taxes

19

Income tax expense

337

Investments in associates, net of income taxes

(1)

Financial expenses

233

Financial income

(117)

Income from operations

1,644

660

267

844

(127)

Amortization of intangible assets

350

177

141

25

8

Impairment of goodwill

97

19

78

EBITA1)

2,091

856

486

869

(119)

Restructuring and acquisition-related charges

318

149

64

50

54

Other items

153

73

67

23

(11)

Adjusted EBITA1)

2,563

1,078

618

943

(76)

2018

Net Income

1,097

Discontinued operations, net of income taxes

213

Income tax expense

193

Investments in associates, net of income taxes

2

Financial expenses

264

Financial income

(51)

Income from operations

1,719

629

399

796

(105)

Amortization of intangible assets

347

98

140

31

79

EBITA1)

2,066

727

539

827

(27)

Restructuring and acquisition-related charges

258

146

66

15

31

Other items

41

-

56

18

(33)

Adjusted EBITA1)

2,366

872

662

860

(28)

2017

Net Income

1,870

Discontinued operations, net of income taxes

(843)

Income tax expense

349

Investments in associates, net of income taxes

4

Financial expenses

263

Financial income

(126)

Income from operations

1,517

512

424

834

(252)

Amortization of intangible assets

260

57

138

39

26

Impairment of goodwill

9

9

EBITA1)

1,787

568

562

873

(217)

Restructuring and acquisition-related charges

316

156

91

6

64

Other items

50

22

31

(3)

Adjusted EBITA1)

2,153

747

684

879

(157)

Transactions between the segments are mainly related to components and parts included in the product portfolio of the other segments. The pricing of such transactions was at cost or determined on an arm’s length basis. Philips has no single external customer that represents 10% or more of sales.

Philips Group

Main countries

in millions of EUR

2017 - 2019

sales1)

tangible and intangible assets2)

2019

Netherlands

522

2,148

United States

6,667

9,864

China

2,707

340

Japan

1,186

550

Germany

1,087

308

France

505

46

United Kingdom

470

611

Other countries

6,338

1,119

Total main countries

19,482

14,986

2018

Netherlands

510

1,666

United States

6,050

9,493

China

2,380

353

Japan

1,045

491

Germany

1,032

263

France

519

30

South Korea

498

3

Other countries

6,087

1,506

Total main countries

18,121

13,805

2017

Netherlands

414

1,154

United States

6,084

8,408

China

2,322

959

Japan

1,059

457

Germany

1,011

270

France

530

33

India

425

100

Other countries

5,935

1,263

Total main countries

17,780

12,644

*)Non-IFRS financial measure. For the definition and reconciliation of the most directly comparable IFRS measure, refer to Reconciliation of non-IFRS information.

3Discontinued operations and assets classified as held for sale

In 2019, Discontinued operations consist primarily of certain other divestments formerly reported as discontinued operations. The below table summarizes the discontinued operations, net of income taxes results reported in the consolidated statements of income.

Philips Group

Discontinued operations, net of income taxes

in millions of EUR

2017 - 2019

2017

2018

2019

Signify

896

(198)

The combined Lumileds and Automotive businesses

(29)

12

Other

(24)

(27)

(19)

Discontinued operations, net of income taxes

843

(213)

(19)

As explained below, in 2019, there were no results from discontinued operations for Signify and combined Lumileds and Automotive businesses.

Signify

As from December 31, 2018, Philips was no longer able to exercise significant influence with respect to Signify. The results related to Philips' retained interest in Signify until the moment the company lost significant influence were recognized in discontinued operations. These results related to an overall EUR 198 million loss, which reflected dividends received of EUR 32 million and a loss due to value adjustments of EUR 218 million.

As of December 31, 2018 the remaining shareholding in Signify was part of continued operations. For further details, please refer to Other financial assets.

The following table summarizes the results of Signify included in the Consolidated statements of income as discontinued operations.

Results of Signify

in millions of EUR

2017 - 2018

2017

2018

Sales

6,319

Costs and expenses

(5,776)

(18)

Result on the deconsolidation of discontinued operations

538

Fair value adjustment retained interest

(104)

(218)

Dividend income

32

Income before tax

977

(204)

Income tax expense

(150)

7

Income tax on the deconsolidation of discontinued operations

61

US Tax Cuts and Jobs Act

8

Results from discontinued operations

896

(198)

Discontinued operations: Combined Lumileds and Automotive businesses

On June 30, 2017, Philips completed the sale of an 80.1% interest in the combined Lumileds and Automotive businesses to certain funds managed by affiliates of Apollo Global Management, LLC. In the first quarter of 2018 we reached a final settlement resulting in a gain of EUR 8 million.

The combined businesses of Lumileds and Automotive were reported as discontinued operations as from the end of November 2014.

For details on the retained interest in the combined Lumileds and Automotive businesses we refer to Other financial assets.

The following table summarizes the results of the combined businesses of Lumileds and Automotive in the Consolidated statements of income as discontinued operations.

Philips Group

Results of combined Lumileds and Automotive businesses

in millions of EUR

2017 - 2018

2017

2018

Sales

804

Costs and expenses

(630)

5

Result on the sale of discontinued operations

(98)

8

Income before tax

76

13

Income tax expense

(25)

(1)

Income tax on the sale of discontinued operations

26

US Tax Cuts and Jobs Act

(107)

Results from discontinued operations

(29)

12

Discontinued operations: Other

Certain costs related to other divestments, which were previously reported as discontinued operations, resulted in a net loss of EUR 19 million in 2019 (2018: a net loss of EUR 27 million; 2017: a net loss of EUR 24 million) .

Discontinued operations cash flows

The following table presents the net cash flows of operating, investing and financing activities reported in the Consolidated cash flow statements related to discontinued operations.

Discontinued operations cash flows

in millions of EUR

2017 - 2019

2017

2018

2019

Cash flows from operating activities

350

(15)

(11)

Cash flows from investing activities

856

662

(14)

Cash flows from financing activities

(144)

Total discontinued operations cash flows

1,063

647

(25)

In 2019, net cash used for discontinued operations consists primarily of settlements related to divestment formerly reported as discontinued operations.

In 2018, discontinued operations cash flows mainly include EUR 642 million related to the sale of Signify shares and dividend received from Signify reported in investing activities. The sale of Signify shares in 2017 (prior to losing control) are included in cash flows from financing activities of continuing operations.

In 2017, cash flows from operating activities reflect the period prior to the divestment of the combined Lumileds and Automotive businesses (six months of cash flows) and prior to the deconsolidation of Signify (eleven months of cash flows). In 2017, cash flows from investing activities includes the net cash outflow related to the deconsolidation of Signify of EUR 175 million, consisting of EUR 545 million proceeds from the sale of shares on November 28, 2017, offset by the deconsolidation of EUR 720 million of cash and cash equivalents, and proceeds of EUR 1,067 million received from the sale of the combined Lumileds and Automotive businesses.

Assets classified as held for sale

As of December 31, 2019, assets held for sale consisted of property, plant and equipment for an amount of EUR 13 million.

As of December 31, 2018, assets held for sale consisted of property, plant and equipment for an amount of EUR 23 million, and assets and liabilities directly associated with assets-held-for-sale businesses of EUR 52 million.

As of December 31, 2017, assets held for sale consisted of the retained interest in Signify for an amount of EUR 1,264 million, property, plant and equipment for an amount of EUR 40 million, and assets and liabilities directly associated with assets held for sale businesses of EUR 44 million.

4Acquisitions and divestments

2019

Acquisitions

Philips completed three acquisitions in 2019, with the Healthcare Information Systems business of Carestream Health being the most notable. The acquisitions involved an aggregated net cash outflow of EUR 199 million and a contingent consideration of EUR 11 million at fair value, the latter recognized as a Long-term provision. The aggregated impact on Goodwill and Other intangible assets was EUR 69 million and EUR 105 million respectively.

Opening balance positions are provisional and subject to final purchase price adjustments, which are expected to be finalized in the third quarter of 2020. The primary provisional accounts subject to change are related to acquired intangible assets and goodwill.

Divestments

Philips completed two divestments in 2019 which resulted in an aggregated cash consideration of EUR 122 million and a gain of EUR 62 million. The most notable was the sale of Photonics business in Germany.

2018

Philips completed nine acquisitions in 2018. The acquisitions involved an aggregated net cash outflow of EUR 476 million and a contingent consideration (including 2019 purchase price adjustments) of EUR 361 million at fair value. Including 2019 purchase price adjustments, these acquisitions had an aggregated impact on Goodwill and Other intangible assets of EUR 444 million and EUR 416 million respectively.

EPD Solutions Ltd. (EPD) was the most notable acquisition and is discussed below.

The remaining eight acquisitions involved an aggregated net cash outflow of EUR 228 million and a contingent consideration (including 2019 purchase price adjustments) of EUR 116 million at fair value. Separately, the net cash outflow ranged from EUR 2 million to EUR 90 million. Including 2019 purchase price adjustments, these remaining acquisitions had an aggregated impact on Goodwill and Other intangible assets of EUR 173 million and EUR 189 million respectively. The purchase price adjustments for the other acquisitions in aggregate recognized in 2019, resulted in an increase of EUR 5 million Goodwill, a decrease of EUR 27 million Other intangible assets, a decrease of EUR 11 million contingent consideration and an increase of EUR 11 million related to various other assets and liabilities.

EPD

On July 9, 2018 Philips acquired 100% of the outstanding shares of EPD for an upfront cash consideration of EUR 250 million and a contingent consideration, due between December 31, 2018 and December 31, 2030. In connection with the contingent consideration, the company recognized a Long-term provision of EUR 239 million at closing of the transaction, which was increased to EUR 245 million due to purchase price adjustments processed in the course of 2019. The estimated fair value of the contingent consideration is re-measured at each reporting period. Therefore, any changes in the fair value impacts reported earnings in each reporting period, thereby resulting in variability in earnings. For more details about the fair value measurements please refer to Fair value of financial assets and liabilities. The overall cash position of EPD on the transaction date was EUR 2 million.

EPD is an innovator in image-guided procedures for cardiac arrhythmias (heart rhythm disorders). As of the date of acquisition, EPD is part of the Diagnosis & Treatment segment.

In 2018, acquisition-related costs of EUR 6 million were recognized in General and administrative expenses.

The condensed opening balance sheet of EPD, including final purchase price adjustments processed in the course of 2019, was as follows:

EPD

Opening Balance sheet as of acquisition date

in millions of EUR

Goodwill

271

Intangible assets excluding goodwill

227

Cash

2

Accounts payable and other payables

(2)

Deferred tax liabilities

(3)

Provision for contingent consideration

(245)

Total assets and liabilities

250

Financed by equity

(250)

The purchase price adjustments to Goodwill, contingent consideration and Deferred tax liabilities recognized in 2019 resulted in an increase of respectively EUR 9 million, EUR 6 million and EUR 3 million.

Goodwill recognized in the amount of EUR 271 million mainly represents expected revenue synergies leveraging the complementarity between EPD's cardiac imaging and navigation system solutions and Philips' interventional imaging systems.

Other intangible assets comprised of EUR 227 million of Technology amortized over 10 years.

The fair value of Technology is determined using the multi-period excess earnings method, which is a valuation technique that estimates the fair value of an asset based on market participants' expectations of the cash flows associated with that asset over its remaining useful life. The fair value of Technology is based on an estimate of positive future cash flows associated with incremental profits related to excess earnings until 2032, discounted at a rate of 14.4%.

As from acquisition date, the contribution of EPD to revenue and net income in 2018 was not material.

Divestments

Philips completed two divestments in 2018. The divestments involved an aggregated cash consideration of EUR 68 million.

5Interests in entities

In this section we discuss the nature of the company’s interests in its consolidated entities and associates, and the effects of those interests on the company’s financial position and financial performance.

Group companies

Below is a list of material subsidiaries as per December 31, 2019 representing greater than 5% of either the consolidated group Sales, Income from operations or Income from continuing operations (before any intra-group eliminations) of Group legal entities. All of the entities are fully consolidated in the group accounts of the company.

Philips Group

Interests in group companies

in alphabetical order

2019

Legal entity name

Principal country of business

Philips (China) Investment Company, Ltd.

China

Philips Medizin Systeme Böblingen GmbH

Germany

Philips GmbH

Germany

Philips Japan, Ltd.

Japan

Philips Electronics Nederland B.V.

Netherlands

Philips Consumer Lifestyle B.V.

Netherlands

Philips Ultrasound, Inc.

United States

Philips Oral Healthcare, LLC

United States

Philips North America LLC

United States

Respironics, Inc.

United States

Information related to Non-controlling interests

As of December 31, 2019, six consolidated subsidiaries are not wholly owned by Philips (December 31, 2018: six). In 2019, Sales to third parties and Net income for these subsidiaries in aggregate are EUR 581 million (December 31, 2018: EUR 627 million) and EUR 9 million (December 31, 2018: EUR 27 million) respectively.

Investments in associates

Philips has investments in a number of associates. None of them are regarded as individually material. During 2019, Philips purchased three investments in associates, which involved an aggregate amount of EUR 1 million.

Involvement with unconsolidated structured entities

Philips founded three Philips Medical Capital (PMC) entities, in the United States, France and Germany, in which Philips holds a minority interest. Philips Medical Capital, LLC in the United States is the most significant entity. PMC entities provide healthcare equipment financing and leasing services to Philips customers for diagnostic imaging equipment, patient monitoring equipment, and clinical IT systems.

The company concluded that it does not control, and therefore should not consolidate the PMC entities. In the United States, PMC operates as a subsidiary of De Lage Landen Financial Services, Inc. The same structure and treatment are applied to the PMC entities in the other countries, with other majority shareholders. Operating agreements are in place for all PMC entities, whereby acceptance of sales and financing transactions resides with the respective majority shareholder. After acceptance of a transaction by PMC, Philips transfers control and does not retain any obligations towards PMC or its customers, from the sales contracts.

At December 31, 2019, Philips’ stake in Philips Medical Capital, LLC had a carrying value of EUR 25 million (December 31, 2018: EUR 24 million).

The company does not have any material exposures to losses from interests in unconsolidated structured entities other than the invested amounts.

6Income from operations

For information related to Sales on a segment and geographical basis, see Information by segment and main country.

Philips Group

Sales and costs by nature

in millions of EUR

2017 - 2019

2017

2018

2019

Sales

17,780

18,121

19,482

Costs of materials used

(4,918)

(4,826)

(5,321)

Employee benefit expenses

(5,824)

(5,827)

(6,307)

Depreciation and amortization1)2)

(1,025)

(1,089)

(1,402)

Shipping and handling

(602)

(605)

(636)

Advertising and promotion

(939)

(937)

(972)

Lease expense2)3)4)

(227)

(225)

(52)

Other operational costs5)

(2,804)

(2,947)

(3,114)

Other business income (expenses)

76

55

(34)

Income from operations

1,517

1,719

1,644

Sales composition and disaggregation

Philips Group

Sales composition

in millions of EUR

2017 - 2019

2017

2018

2019

Goods

13,974

13,973

14,810

Services

3,477

3,325

3,811

Royalties

329

402

381

Total sales from contracts with customers

17,780

17,700

19,003

Other sources1)

421

479

Sales

17,780

18,121

19,482

At December 31, 2019, the aggregate amount of the transaction price allocated to remaining performance obligations from a sale of goods and services was EUR 11,692 million. The company expects to recognize approximately 49% of the remaining performance obligations within 1 year. Revenue expected to be recognized beyond 1 year is mostly related to longer term customer service and software contracts.

Philips Group

Disaggregation of Sale per segment

in millions of EUR

2019

2019

Sales at a point in time

Sales over time

Total sales from contracts with customers

Sales from other sources1)

Total sales2)

Diagnosis & Treatment

5,428

2,988

8,417

68

8,485

Connected Care

3,545

718

4,263

411

4,674

Personal Health

5,848

6

5,854

-

5,854

Other

162

308

469

-

469

Philips Group

14,982

4,021

19,003

479

19,482

Philips Group

Disaggregation of Sale per segment

in millions of EUR

2017-2018

2017

2018

Total sales

Sales at a point in time

Sales over time

Total sales from contracts with customers

Sales from other sources1)

Total sales2)

Diagnosis & Treatment

7,365

5,034

2,631

7,665

61

7,726

Connected Care

4,331

3,351

630

3,981

360

4,341

Personal Health

5,685

5,519

5

5,524

-

5,524

Other

400

282

249

530

-

530

Philips Group

17,780

14,186

3,514

17,700

421

18,121

Philips Group

Disaggregation of Sales per geographical cluster

in millions of EUR

2019

2019

Sales at a point in time

Sales over time

Total sales from contracts with customers

Sales from other sources1)

Total sales2)

Western Europe

3,165

931

4,096

38

4,134

North America

4,944

1,894

6,837

114

6,951

Other mature geographies

1,226

357

1,583

322

1,905

Total mature geographies

9,335

3,181

12,515

474

12,990

Growth geographies

5,647

840

6,488

5

6,492

Sales

14,982

4,021

19,003

479

19,482

Philips Group

Disaggregation of Sales per geographical cluster

in millions of EUR

2017 - 2018

2017

2018

Total sales

Sales at a point in time

Sales over time

Total sales from contracts with customers

Sales from other sources1)

Total sales2)

Western Europe

3,802

3,174

780

3,955

35

3,990

North America

6,409

4,542

1,696

6,238

100

6,338

Other mature geographies

1,707

1,270

339

1,609

283

1,892

Total mature geographies

11,918

8,987

2,815

11,802

418

12,221

Growth geographies

5,862

5,199

700

5,898

2

5,901

Sales

17,780

14,186

3,514

17,700

421

18,121

Costs of materials used

Cost of materials used represents the inventory recognized in cost of sales.

Employee benefit expenses

Philips Group

Employee benefit expenses

in millions of EUR

2017 - 2019

2017

2018

2019

Salaries and wages1)

4,856

4,849

5,251

Post-employment benefits costs

347

351

379

Other social security and similar charges:

- Required by law

514

524

564

- Voluntary

108

103

112

Employee benefit expenses

5,824

5,827

6,307

The employee benefit expenses relate to employees who are working on the payroll of Philips, both with permanent and temporary contracts.

For further information on post-employment benefit costs, see Post-employment benefits.

For details on the remuneration of the members of the Board of Management and the Supervisory Board, see Information on remuneration.

Employees

The average number of employees by category is summarized as follows:

Philips Group

Employees

in FTEs

2017 - 2019

2017

2018

2019

Production

27,697

30,774

35,640

Research & development

9,787

10,700

12,287

Other

26,314

26,175

24,301

Employees

63,798

67,649

72,228

3rd party workers

8,098

7,239

6,164

Continuing operations

71,895

74,888

78,392

Discontinued operations

43,497

Philips Group

115,392

74,888

78,392

Employees consist of those persons working on the payroll of Philips and whose costs are reflected in the Employee benefit expenses table. 3rd party workers consist of personnel hired on a per-period basis, via external companies.

Philips Group

Employees per geographical location

in FTEs

2017 - 2019

2017

2018

2019

Netherlands

11,308

11,427

11,679

Other countries

60,587

63,460

66,713

Continuing operations

71,895

74,888

78,392

Discontinued operations

43,497

Philips Group

115,392

74,888

78,392

Depreciation and amortization

Depreciation of property, plant and equipment and amortization of intangible assets, including impairments, are as follows:

Philips Group

Depreciation and amortization1)2)

in millions of EUR

2017 - 2019

2017

2018

2019

Depreciation of property, plant and equipment

437

438

645

Amortization of software

50

64

75

Amortization of other intangible assets

260

347

350

Amortization of development costs

277

240

332

Depreciation and amortization

1,025

1,089

1,402

Depreciation of property, plant and equipment is primarily included in cost of sales. Amortization of the categories of other intangible assets are reported in selling expenses for brand names and customer relationships and are reported in cost of sales for technology based and other intangible assets. Amortization of development cost is included in research and development expenses.

Shipping and handling

Shipping and handling costs are included in cost of sales and selling expenses in Consolidated statements of income. Further information on when costs are to be reported to cost of sales or selling expenses can be found in Significant accounting policies.

Advertising and promotion

Advertising and promotion costs are included in selling expenses in Consolidated statements of income.

Audit fees

The table below shows the fees attributable to the fiscal years 2017, 2018 and 2019 for services rendered by the respective Group auditors.

Philips Group

Agreed fees

in millions of EUR

2017 - 2019

2017

2018

2019

EY NL1)

EY Network

Total

EY NL1)

EY Network

Total

EY NL1)

EY Network

Total

Audit fees

9.0

8.9

17.9

7.2

5.0

12.2

8.4

6.0

14.4

-consolidated financial statements

9.0

4.4

13.4

7.2

2.4

9.6

8.4

3.4

11.8

-statutory financial statements

4.5

4.5

2.6

2.6

2.6

2.6

Audit-related fees2)

0.8

0.7

1.5

0.6

0.4

1.0

0.5

0.2

0.7

-Sustainability assurance

0.7

0.7

0.4

0.4

0.4

0.4

-Other

0.1

0.7

0.8

0.2

0.4

0.6

0.1

0.2

0.3

Fees

9.7

9.6

19.4

7.8

5.4

13.2

8.9

6.2

15.1

Other business income (expenses)

Other business income (expenses) consists of the following:

Philips Group

Other business income (expenses)

in millions of EUR

2017 - 2019

2017

2018

2019

Result on disposal of businesses:

- income

15

45

69

- expense

(5)

-

(2)

Result on disposal of fixed assets:

- income

96

20

5

- expense

(1)

(1)

-

Result on other remaining businesses:

- income

41

23

81

- expense

(62)

(32)

(88)

Impairment of goodwill1)

(9)

(97)

Other business income (expense)

76

55

(34)

Total other business income

152

88

155

Total other business expense

(76)

(33)

(188)

The result on disposal of businesses was mainly due to divestment of non-strategic businesses.

The result on disposal of fixed assets was mainly due to sale of real estate assets.

The result on other remaining businesses mainly relates to revaluation of contingent consideration, non-core revenue and various legal matters.

For more information, please refer to Acquisitions and divestments.

7Financial income and expenses

Philips Group

Financial income and expenses

in millions of EUR

2017 - 2019

2017

2018

2019

Interest income

40

31

27

Interest income from loans and receivables1)

12

8

10

Interest income from cash and cash equivalents

28

22

17

Dividend income from financial assets

64

2

52

Net gains from disposal of financial assets

1

6

2

Net change in fair value of financial assets at fair value through profit or loss

7

17

Other financial income

14

12

17

Financial income

126

51

117

Interest expense

(222)

(188)

(196)

Interest on debt and borrowings

(177)

(158)

(167)

Finance charges under lease contract

(8)

(7)

(6)

Interest expenses - pensions

(37)

(23)

(22)

Provision-related accretion and interest

(22)

(15)

(22)

Net foreign exchange losses

(2)

(2)

(2)

Impairment loss of financial assets

(2)

-

-

Net change in fair value of financial assets at fair value through profit or loss

(1)

Other financial expenses

(15)

(58)

(13)

Financial expense

(263)

(264)

(233)

Financial income and expenses

(137)

(213)

(117)

In 2019, net financial expenses decreased by EUR 96 million year-on-year, mainly due to dividend income from investments, while 2018 included financial charges of EUR 46 million related to bonds redemptions. Net interest expense in 2019 was EUR 12 million higher than in 2018, mainly due to interest expense of EUR 20 million on lease liabilities recorded in 2019 following the adoption of IFRS 16.

In 2018, net financial expenses were EUR 213 million, which was EUR 76 million higher than in 2017. Other financial expenses included financial charges related to the early redemption of USD bonds of EUR 46 million. Net interest expense in 2018 was EUR 25 million lower than in 2017, mainly due to lower interest expenses on pensions and lower interest expenses on net debt*). The definition of this non-IFRS measure and a reconciliation to the IFRS measure is included in Equity.

*)Non-IFRS financial measure. For the definition and reconciliation of the most directly comparable IFRS measure, refer to Reconciliation of non-IFRS information.

8Income taxes

The income tax expense of continuing operations amounted to EUR 337 million (2018: EUR 193 million, 2017 EUR 349 million).

The components of income before taxes and income tax expense are as follows:

Philips Group

Income tax expense

in millions of EUR

2017 - 2019

2017

2018

2019

Netherlands

929

636

784

Foreign

451

869

744

Income before taxes of continuing operations1)

1,381

1,505

1,528

Netherlands:

Current tax (expense) benefit

(15)

(25)

(26)

Deferred tax (expense) benefit

(150)

16

(71)

Total tax (expense) benefit of continuing operations (Netherlands)

(165)

(9)

(97)

Foreign:

Current tax (expense) benefit

(258)

(289)

(297)

Deferred tax (expense) benefit

73

105

57

Total tax (expense) benefit of continuing operations (foreign)

(184)

(184)

(240)

Income tax expense of continuing operations

(349)

(193)

(337)

Income tax expense of continuing operations excludes the tax benefit of the discontinued operations of EUR 9 million (2018: EUR 14 million tax benefit, 2017: EUR 182 million tax expense), further detailed in section Discontinued operations and assets classified as held for sale.

The components of income tax expense of continuing operations are as follows:

Philips Group

Current income tax expense

in millions of EUR

2017 - 2019

2017

2018

2019

Current year tax (expense) benefit

(275)

(318)

(322)

Prior year tax (expense) benefit

3

4

(2)

Current tax (expense)

(272)

(314)

(324)

Philips Group

Deferred income tax expense

In millions of EUR

2017 - 2019

2017

2018

2019

Changes to recognition of tax loss and credit carry forwards

23

(2)

59

Changes to recognition of temporary differences

35

4

(32)

Prior year tax (expense) benefit

6

15

(7)

Tax rate changes

(72)

(26)

2

Origination and reversal of temporary differences, tax losses and tax credits

(69)

130

(35)

Deferred tax (expense) benefit

(77)

121

(13)

Philips’ operations are subject to income taxes in various foreign jurisdictions. The statutory income tax rate varies per country, which results in a difference between the weighted average statutory income tax rate and the Netherlands’ statutory income tax rate of 25.0% (2018: 25.0% 2017: 25.0%).

A reconciliation of the weighted average statutory income tax rate to the effective income tax rate of continuing operations is as follows:

Philips Group

Effective income tax rate

in %

2017 - 2019

2017

2018

2019

Weighted average statutory income tax rate in %

24.5

24.9

25.2

Recognition of previously unrecognized tax loss and credit carryforwards

(2.3)

(0.4)

(3.9)

Unrecognized tax loss and credit carryforwards

0.6

0.5

0.1

Changes to recognition of temporary differences

(2.6)

(0.3)

2.1

Non-taxable income and tax incentives

(9.8)

(11.9)

(9.5)

Non-deductible expenses

6.4

3.7

5.3

Withholding and other taxes

4

4.5

3.7

Tax rate changes

5.2

1.8

(0.1)

Prior year tax

(0.6)

(1.3)

0.6

Tax expenses (benefit) due to other tax liabilities

(1.7)

(8.6)

(1.6)

Others, net

1.5

(0.1)

0.2

Effective income tax rate

25.3

12.8

22.1

The effective income tax rate is lower than the weighted average statutory income tax rate in 2019 mainly due to recurring favorable tax incentives relating to R&D investments and export activities. In addition, business integration in 2019 resulted in one-off non-cash tax benefits which are mainly due to recognition of previously unrecognized tax loss carryforwards and higher tax incentives on export activities, partly offset by tax costs presented in changes to recognition of temporary differences.

The increase in effective income tax rate compared to 2018 is mainly due to lower non-cash benefits from tax audit resolutions and business integration, partly offset by lower provisions for tax risks.

Deferred tax assets and liabilities

Deferred tax assets are recognized for temporary differences, unused tax losses, and unused tax credits to the extent that realization of the related tax benefits is probable. The ultimate realization of deferred tax assets is dependent upon the generation of future taxable income in the countries where the deferred tax assets originated and during the periods when the deferred tax assets become deductible. Management considers the scheduled reversal of deferred tax liabilities, projected future taxable income, and tax planning strategies in making this assessment.

Net deferred tax assets relate to the following underlying assets and liabilities and tax loss carryforwards (including tax credit carryforwards) and their movements during the years 2019 and 2018 respectively are presented in the tables below.

The net deferred tax assets of EUR 1,721 million (2018: EUR 1,676 million) consist of deferred tax assets of EUR 1,865 million (2018:EUR 1,828 million) and deferred tax liabilities of EUR 143 million (2018: EUR 152 million). Of the total deferred tax assets of EUR 1,865 million at December 31, 2019 (2018: EUR 1,828 million), EUR 239 million (2018: EUR 203 million) is recognized in respect of entities in various countries where there have been tax losses in the current or preceding period. Management’s projections support the assumption that it is probable that the results of future operations will generate sufficient taxable income to utilize these deferred tax assets.

At December 31, 2019 the temporary differences associated with investments, including potential income tax consequences on dividends, for which no deferred tax liabilities are recognized, aggregate to EUR 327 million (2018: EUR 186 million).

Philips Group

Deferr